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How does Netherlands/Germany do it?


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#16 OP nukenorman

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Posted 14 December 2013 - 22:18

It's not just Germany or the Netherlands. Most of European houses are built of brick, with tiled roofs. Most roads are tarmac, concrete or stone, most "sidewalks" are paving slabs, stone or tarmac.

 

It's not "rich", it's perfectly normal; Just like building houses from wood is normal in the US.

 

As for the cleanliness you mention, that's a societal thing.  The Dutch and Germans are just cleaner than Americans! :p  They don't throw their garbage in the streets and recycle a hell of a lot more.

I agree and they dont use shutters in the USA very often most of them are fake shutters. Concrete or brick houses plus shutters or Rollandens like they use in Germany would help cover the windows etc instead of bording them up.




#17 Lant

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Posted 14 December 2013 - 22:21

It might also be that (from my experience anyway) European houses are much smaller than in the USA.
So the quantity of the building materials is much less, making it cheaper to build than an equivalent American house.



#18 OP nukenorman

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Posted 14 December 2013 - 22:22

Nothing racial or anything against Romance/ Latin Europe but I see a huge difference when crossing all borders from Germanic Europe to Latin Europe. Same with economies and unemployment. But yea I know this is off topic and not related to much of my first post as I wanted to stricly talk about these expensive materials, etc. USA suppost to be rich where I am from but yea Netherlands and Germany just amaze me.



#19 HawkMan

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Posted 14 December 2013 - 22:24

The house material actually comes down to most common nearby natural material. Netherlands have far more access to stone than wood. As for Germany I believe stone or wood depends on where you are and especially in the mountain where wood is more accessible, most houses will be wood, also it's colder in the mountains and wood is more practical for heat and insulating purposes there.

There also of course a long perspective when it comes to economics for certain choruses like roofs, natural or "artificial" stone roofs have a much longer lifespan than other for types, and thus becomes cheaper over the lifetime. Over here in the past a lot of houses used living grass roofs(some still do, but then generally older style log cabins and such, usually expensive ones) since they virtually last forever and are naturally insulating and waterproof.

#20 HawkMan

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Posted 14 December 2013 - 22:26

It might also be that (from my experience anyway) European houses are much smaller than in the USA.
So the quantity of the building materials is much less, making it cheaper to build than an equivalent American house.


Just FYI, stone and/or brick houses aren't necessarily more expensive to build than wood houses, not over here anyway. But building regulations tend to be a lot stricter over here.

#21 Steven P.

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Posted 14 December 2013 - 22:31

Taxes.. cost of living here is expensive too. I love it here though :)



#22 jakem1

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Posted 14 December 2013 - 23:06

Try going to Italy. They charge for motorways that only have two lanes (with no hard shoulder), have roadworks everywhere, the barriers are solid concrete with no regards to safety and they also have speed cameras everywhere. Most rural roads have no barriers, even along cliff edges, and the road simply drops away at the edges. Painted lines appear and disappear at random (on motorways as well as main roads).

 

Roads in the UK aren't great but they certainly aren't the worst.

 

That's an odd thing to say.  The majority of Italian motorways I've driven on (all over the country) have three lanes and I've rarely encountered roadworks although that's probably just lucky timing (driving in the south of France one year I was constantly delayed by roadworks and vowed never to do it again).  I don't recall driving on roads without a barrier on a cliff edge either.

 

Having said that, I agree with you about the concrete barriers and the lack of a hard shoulder.  That can be terrifying, especially when overtaking in the fast lane.  The other irritating thing about driving in Italy and France is the constant tollbooths.

 

The best motorways I've ever driven on would have to be in Germany.  Even in the middle of winter with thick snow all over the place they're pristine and very safe and easy to drive on.  British roads are OK but the thing I like about driving in this country is that everyone is generally very considerate, much more so than in other countries.



#23 theyarecomingforyou

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Posted 14 December 2013 - 23:40

That's an odd thing to say.  The majority of Italian motorways I've driven on (all over the country) have three lanes and I've rarely encountered roadworks although that's probably just lucky timing (driving in the south of France one year I was constantly delayed by roadworks and vowed never to do it again).  I don't recall driving on roads without a barrier on a cliff edge either.

I went on a road trip around Italy focused mainly around the north, including Pisa, Florence, Venice, Parma, San Marino, Rome, Perugia, Orvieto, Gubbio and Verona. There were three-lane motorways too but I was surprised by the amount that were only two lanes and the way the barriers were all temporary looking concrete blocks. Most of my time was spent around Florence, as that's where my ex-girlfriend lived. My experience of Italian roads was not positive.



#24 Enron

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Posted 15 December 2013 - 00:21

Germans prefer to build it right the first time and have it last. Americans build below sea level and sit there refusing to evacuate when a category 5 hurricane is approaching. Then we spend billions rebuilding it and subsidizing the people who didn't evacuate.



#25 OP nukenorman

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Posted 15 December 2013 - 00:41

Germans prefer to build it right the first time and have it last. Americans build below sea level and sit there refusing to evacuate when a category 5 hurricane is approaching. Then we spend billions rebuilding it and subsidizing the people who didn't evacuate.

Yea the Amerians for new orelans after the hurricane had to bring in the Dutch to help re engineer their levys etc since American Army core of engineers had so many design failures lol.  Dutch and Germanys very good engineers.



#26 jakem1

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Posted 15 December 2013 - 01:04

I went on a road trip around Italy focused mainly around the north, including Pisa, Florence, Venice, Parma, San Marino, Rome, Perugia, Orvieto, Gubbio and Verona. There were three-lane motorways too but I was surprised by the amount that were only two lanes and the way the barriers were all temporary looking concrete blocks. Most of my time was spent around Florence, as that's where my ex-girlfriend lived. My experience of Italian roads was not positive.

 

Fair enough.  There's definitely a mix of two and three lane motorways but my memory is that there are more of the latter. 

 

Thinking about it made me remember that the thing I hate most about Italian motorways is the spaghetti junctions.  They are definitely the worst and most complicated and most poorly signed in the world :laugh:



#27 NinjaGinger

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Posted 15 December 2013 - 01:15

I reckon its simple. The cake is more distributed. There are still rich, don't get me wrong, but the crumbs for the cake are better distributed and there are a few more crumbs. UK is best seen as third world treatment for those that cant afford better and the population is well brainwashed into thinking it cant do anything about it if they realized the bad deal for most. 5th richest county in the World, 43rd highest standard of living. Ironically overall India is the fourth richest and WE give them aid. Always been well behind the rest of Europe but the majority don't realize.
As for Holland and Germany, I reckon the people that can make a difference, do.

#28 Growled

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Posted 16 December 2013 - 00:49

I suppose the reason stone is more expensive here is that it's rarely used, at at least used a whole lot less. Just like everything else, the more common something is, the less it costs.



#29 HawkMan

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Posted 16 December 2013 - 05:21

Nah, the thing is, stone/brick houses can't be built cheap/like crap. American building codes are a lot more lax than over here so you can build really cheap wood houses. Over here building codes and the environment means we can't build wood houses like crap. So it's not that stone houses are cheaper, but that wood houses are more expensive because we build them more solidly to start with. Basically your hurricane proof wood houses, that's our minimum standard plus some extra insulation and such.

#30 vetJohn S.

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Posted 16 December 2013 - 05:43

Only coastal homes would need to worry about real shutters on the windows or being hurricane proof.  Those of us in the US that are blessed enough to live in mountainous areas don't need to worry about such things.   :)

 

Still, you can't paint the entire country with such broad generalizations.  I find it fascinating the different building techniques in places such as Hilton Head Island, where they have actual shutters and houses built on stilts to protect them in the event of typhoons, etc. The US is a much newer country compared to many mentioned above, stone building was more more commonplace a few hundred years ago before America was settled.





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