630 million Windows 7 licenses sold to date

Microsoft love to tout their impressive statistics and is not holding back at MWPC - they have said that they have sold 630 million Windows 7 licenses and more than 50% of corporations are now running the platform. 

Windows 7 is clearly the blockbuster follow-up to Windows XP. With corporations now adopting the Windows 7 platform on a wide scale, the operating system will be sticking around for some time and is likely to be here for over a decade.

With Windows 8 on the horizon, Microsoft is making a bold bet with Windows 8 by re-thinking the Start experience. By making this bet across all of its products, we are starting to see Microsoft's new bold endeavors with Windows Phone 8, Windows 8, Surface, and so much more out of the company.

It's an exciting time to be a Microsoft fan and the fun is only getting started. As Microsoft keeps the content flowing over the few days at MWPC, we will keep you updated with all that is happening.

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...and the fun is only getting started

damn straight

time will tell now won't it

oh and i wonder of those 650 how many were OEM licenses sold
in bulk to companies like Dell or HP and so on..

aviator189 said,
just give me a start button for windows 8 and I'll buy it.

In addition to the Start button, provide some mechanism to turn off the damnable Metro UI, and I'll seriously consider Windows-8. The constant pandering to mobile devices, to the abandonment of laptop/desktop users is a serious deterrent to Windows-8 adoption.

Expect Windows 7 adoption accelerate as we move to Windows XP's EOL in 2014. Really proud of Microsoft and I agree, Windows 7 is the best operating system from the company.

problem is making these 670 million people move to Win 8. There's a group who thinks XP is better and another who wont move from 7.

still1 said,
problem is making these 670 million people move to Win 8. There's a group who thinks XP is better and another who wont move from 7.

The "stay with XP" people are something else, but I agree that getting enterprises to move from 7 to 8 after just having upgraded to 7 will prove difficult. I'd expect Windows 7 to remain available for purchase and Windows 9 will be a refinement of Metro better suited for enterprise desktops, while Windows 8 will (hopefully) catch on in the mobile computing market - ultrabooks, laptops, tablets, etc.

Enron said,

The "stay with XP" people are something else, but I agree that getting enterprises to move from 7 to 8 after just having upgraded to 7 will prove difficult. I'd expect Windows 7 to remain available for purchase and Windows 9 will be a refinement of Metro better suited for enterprise desktops, while Windows 8 will (hopefully) catch on in the mobile computing market - ultrabooks, laptops, tablets, etc.


What exactly is the barrier to upgrading from Win7 to Win8? If anything, already being on Win7 makes it that much easier to transition to Win8. The primary thing I see holding back Win8 adoption in the enterprise will be budgets and timing. Well, that an IT departments having personal issue with a change in the OS and not wanting to roll it out due to their own preference.

MrHumpty said,

What exactly is the barrier to upgrading from Win7 to Win8? If anything, already being on Win7 makes it that much easier to transition to Win8. The primary thing I see holding back Win8 adoption in the enterprise will be budgets and timing. Well, that an IT departments having personal issue with a change in the OS and not wanting to roll it out due to their own preference.

Well, enterprises like to have all their systems on the same/similar configurations, so cost is one issue (even with the lower price). We finally moved to Windows 7 this year after deploying Windows XP back in 2002. Another issue would be training. I figured Windows 8 out pretty easily myself, but people at my workplace were even confused by Windows 7 at first.

still1 said,
problem is making these 670 million people move to Win 8. There's a group who thinks XP is better and another who wont move from 7.

Ya like the White House XP computers lol
Obama must be one dumb noob then eh ?
Hmm actualy i bet he's smarter than any of the cocky tech nerds around this place lol
But what does he know ? He's aonly the president of the USA

I am Not PCyr said,
Obama must be one dumb noob then eh ?

Obama takes care of all the White House computers too? Quite the talented president.

drazgoosh said,
Doubting whether Windows 8 will be used in business. A really good general consumer OS though. Loving it so far

It will be used in business but on mobile devices like tablets, I really see that as it's way in, which is fine for MS in the end.

drazgoosh said,
Doubting whether Windows 8 will be used in business. A really good general consumer OS though. Loving it so far

We have already turned people off the idea of upgrading their Desktops when its released, thank god.

drazgoosh said,
Doubting whether Windows 8 will be used in business. A really good general consumer OS though. Loving it so far

Correct, Windows-8 business use will be limited to whatever use companies incorporate tablets and smartphones.

Shikaka said,

We have already turned people off the idea of upgrading their Desktops when its released, thank god.

Wait, who is "we" and who we're you able to turn off from upgrading? Because that sounds like there was an effort to make Win8 sound bad s there would be fewer people using it.

Shikaka said,
We have already turned people off the idea of upgrading their Desktops when its released, thank god.

I feel for the users you support.

drazgoosh said,
Doubting whether Windows 8 will be used in business. A really good general consumer OS though. Loving it so far

I'm just curious, are you and the others in this thread who agree really in charge of choosing what is and isn't used at your company?

I'll be rolling out Windows 8 almost instantly (wait a month to see if any issues arise, lets say Jan 2013 will be the first installs). I can't see a valid reason not to with the price differences etc. When it is installed I'm sure we'll field a few questions here and there about the start button, but I expect that to all but die out w/i a month. Pinned to Task Bar is where all of my users go as it is, that won't change.

Honestly, you train a user, they bitch for a month, after a month it is the new normal. The actual change from Win7 to Win8 is negligible. The start menu change is a zero productivity loss regardless of the crying from the "tech elite." Assuming there is some decent Group Policies to deal with Windows Store purchases etc. adding Win8 will work out nicely on the Desktop, not just Tablets. I just don't get that logic. It seems to be less about logic and more about the personal preference/I hate change bubble than anything.

drazgoosh said,
Doubting whether Windows 8 will be used in business. A really good general consumer OS though. Loving it so far

SAP have already shown off how business applications can be developed using the Metro language - the question is whether businesses are willing to take advantage of technology or whether they try to retrofit the technology to the old way of doing things. Just look up just how bad organisations are at adopting technology by reading articles a few years ago about how many organisations fail to properly utilise Active Directory as one example of failure of enterprise customers to keep up with the play.