DDR4 RAM will reach computers next year

DDR4 memory, the successor to DDR3 DRAM, will be available in computers next year, Micron announced on Monday. The company says that it has already started shipping samples of the upcoming memory type, reports Techworld Australia.

DDR3, which is the type of memory that is currently found in most new computers that are built today, is less power-efficient and slower than the upcoming DDR4 standard. It is expected that DDR4 memory units will draw less power, starting at 1.2 volts instead of the 1.5 volts for DDR3. Bus speeds for DDR4 will start at 2133MHz, and the new memory is designed to process read, write and refresh more efficiently than its predecessors.

The Joint Electron Devices Engineering Council (JEDEC), the organization that defines memory standards, is expected to finalize the DDR4 specification in the next few months, after which Micron expects to start volume production of DDR4 memory at some point by the end of 2012.

DDR4 memory will first appear in servers and desktop computers, followed by laptop computers later. Micron in a statement also said that it hopes that DDR4 memory will reach tablets and other portable devices, which currently use low-power versions of DDR3 and DDR2 memory.

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Glassed Silver said,
I'm not jelly at all, mainly because I got 32GB haha

GS:mac

What's the point though of having 32GB? What could possibly use it?

TRC said,

What's the point though of having 32GB? What could possibly use it?


Well, my home Mac is actually a working machine for photo editing, video editing, I'm a hopeless multi-tasker (and not just the small applications), I like having a RAM disk for my browser caches and more, I like the comfortable remaining space after using beyond 16GB, I like dual channel, so 24GB is just awkward.
Also, maxing it out assures me that I don't need to ever upgrade the RAM again in this machine, which is nice, because I tend to pile up RAM sticks and it's annoying haha.

Oh and I got them for a reasonable price, so why not?
Of cause one program alone will hardly use it, well most at least.

GS:mac

DDR probably wont exist in new enthusiasts systems in 5 years time if HMC (Hybrid Memory Cube) gets traction...

15x the performance of DDR3 - Yes 15 times
90% less physical space required on the mobo
70% more energy efficient.

Micron and Samsung are big proponents of this technology which is expected to be officially announced later this year. DDR4 could likely be the last memory of it's type.

http://youtu.be/h2swEqw6pbg

Dorza said,
DDR probably wont exist in new enthusiasts systems in 5 years time if HMC (Hybrid Memory Cube) gets traction...

15x the performance of DDR3 - Yes 15 times
90% less physical space required on the mobo
70% more energy efficient.

Micron and Samsung are big proponents of this technology which is expected to be officially announced later this year. DDR4 could likely be the last memory of it's type.

http://youtu.be/h2swEqw6pbg

Wow, I hadn't heard of that before. REALLY cool.

I doubt ddr3 is going get much cheaper than it is now, itll end up getting more expensive but not till ddr4 is more widely adopted. Like lower demand for something increases price as less is produced.

Itll prolly be inroduced with intels haswell architecture, my next major upgrade will be in 2015 i reckon, new MB ram and CPU (not GPU though cus ill upgrade that whenever i need to).

does ddr4 go into tablets? or is this whole business going to crash in a few years when people stop using desktops?

I have 8 GBs of DDR3 RAM in my machine, really makes a difference, since I run a number VMs and have a lot of programs open. I was planning on buying a computer later this year, but with this coming out, I am wondering if I should wait a bit or probably take advantage of the price on DDR3 when DDR4 hits the market.

I see how this type of market will dwindle in time. You see, things are not like twenty years ago (1990s and early 2000s) where you would get a performance boost when you upgraded RAM, Processors, and Hard Drive.

Right now, the software has reached a stage which does not demand as much as hardware as it did on the past decades.

I am not saying that this improvements are worthless, but they are not "hotly" needed for the casual users. Little will see the difference.
SSD is an exception, since it recreates a different format on how to storage big files, and is unprecedentedly faster than previous generation storage devices. Video Cards and Processors are mainly for gamers and huge compilers, encoders. A Core 2 Duo and a Core i7 Extreme will do little to none impact to the casual user.

Hell, I'm still on DDR2, and I know I won't notice that much of memory bump to DDR3, unless I start doing heavy RAM demanding tasks such as Photoshop, and VMs.

My daughter just bought two sticks of 8 gigs for $59.00...... now thats cheap !!
Would this DDR4 ram be able to be used in todays computers though or would you have to change your motherboard ??

Caveman-ugh said,
My daughter just bought two sticks of 8 gigs for $59.00...... now thats cheap !!
Would this DDR4 ram be able to be used in todays computers though or would you have to change your motherboard ??
New board

cleverclogs said,
LOL, I paid $400AU for 2 x 1GB sticks of DDR3 in December 2007.

You could have waited 5 years. Prices are dirt cheap now

cleverclogs said,
LOL, I paid $400AU for 2 x 1GB sticks of DDR3 in December 2007.

Don't feel bad. I bought two sticks of 512 for $480 a piece back in 2002. That's almost a grand. Wow was I stupid. lol

perfect time to buy DDR3
The manufacturers are trying to push DDR4 for the sole fact that they can rise prices again…

MFH said,
perfect time to buy DDR3
The manufacturers are trying to push DDR4 for the sole fact that they can rise prices again…

Exactly, mean while I will upgrade to ddr3.

ensiform said,
I still haven't upgraded to ddr3 yet :shrug:

Besides my game machine (8GB DDR3), all my other PCs, laptops, HTPCs have only 1/2/4 GB of DDR2 RAM... damn! If I have the 16GB RAM, I would wish I could break it down to several pieces for these machines...

leojei said,

Besides my game machine (8GB DDR3), all my other PCs, laptops, HTPCs have only 1/2/4 GB of DDR2 RAM... damn! If I have the 16GB RAM, I would wish I could break it down to several pieces for these machines...

I'm still on DDR2 also. Makes me sad to look online and see how cheap DDR3 is and how expensive DDR2 is now. Upgrading would mean a new motherboard though, and a new CPU, may as well consider it a new computer. I'm fine with what I have for now.

Crap, I don't want to have to buy new ram again when I upgrade again.. What will I do with this 16GB of DDR3 I got for $80?

Caleo said,
Crap, I don't want to have to buy new ram again when I upgrade again.. What will I do with this 16GB of DDR3 I got for $80?

It's a good 2 or so years off to be affordable.

DPyro said,
16GB? That's more than enough to run any program. What do you need more for?

Most likely a lot of virtual machines, several Photoshop/video editing programs or "just because".

I'm running 8GB on 64 Bit XP with the page file disabled. I run a copy of Windows 7 and Windows 8 in VirtualBox. Both use less RAM the less RAM you allot them. Photoshop refuses to give up it's pagefile which Adobe calls a "scratch disk" though you can move it to a different drive (Edit-->Preferences-->Performance).

The most I've used with all browsers open for testing is roughly 6GB absolute peak. When testing XP for IE7 it's much less, 7 and 8 are memory hogs. I have a dozen windows open and three dozen tabs and I'm at 1.6GB, newer Windows won't finish booting until you've reached a full GB even if you've disabled the pagefile and Superfetch.

JAB Creations said,
I'm running 8GB on 64 Bit XP with the page file disabled. I run a copy of Windows 7 and Windows 8 in VirtualBox. Both use less RAM the less RAM you allot them. Photoshop refuses to give up it's pagefile which Adobe calls a "scratch disk" though you can move it to a different drive (Edit-->Preferences-->Performance).

The most I've used with all browsers open for testing is roughly 6GB absolute peak. When testing XP for IE7 it's much less, 7 and 8 are memory hogs. I have a dozen windows open and three dozen tabs and I'm at 1.6GB, newer Windows won't finish booting until you've reached a full GB even if you've disabled the pagefile and Superfetch.

Get this ImDisk - http://www.ltr-data.se/opencode.html/
It's freeware. It lets you create virtual hard disks in RAM - a perfect place for that photoshop scratch file.

Kushan said,

Get this ImDisk - http://www.ltr-data.se/opencode.html/
It's freeware. It lets you create virtual hard disks in RAM - a perfect place for that photoshop scratch file.

Err, if you're using Photoshop x64 (which you should if you have that much RAM), and set it to use a high percentage of your RAM, something like 70%, you don't need to bother with stupid hacks to utilise your RAM.