Death by digital looming for print publications

Newspapers as we know them will cease to exist in the United States in the next seven years. Print news publications in Britain and Iceland will go the way of the dodo by 2019, futurist Ross Dawson has told The Australian.

Publications in Canada and Norway will hold out until 2020, while concentrated print media ownership in Australia will keep newspapers on life support until 2022, when they will also die off in Hong Kong.

Mr Dawson has previously predicted journalism would soon be ''crowdsourced'' to "hoardes of amateurs overseen by professionals''. The author and chairman of the Future Exploration Network think tank will address a crowdsourcing summit in San Francisco on November 2 and Sydney on November 3.

He said newspapers in countries such as France and Germany will keep kicking until 2029 or 2030 thanks to governments willing to prop them up financially.

But in a statement sure to send shivers down the spines of media magnates everywhere, Mr Dawson said the prognosis for newsprint was terminal. ''In the developed world, newspapers are in the process of becoming extinct, driven by rapidly changing use of media and revenues out of line with cost structures," he said. ''There'll be a transition of what newspapers currently do to other channels of various kinds.''

Those channels include dishing up content via mobile and tablet platforms like Apple's iPad, he said.

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Mmm Not gonna happen. Old people still want newspapers and i like the whole newpaper and real fact of paper within hands. What this should of said is that Newspapers would be cheaper by a lot by then

Or it could just mean people dont care to read by means of 'traditional methods' anymore such as newspapers or books. (not necessarilly saying they prefer to read off electronic device either)

The newspaper in my home town is already down to 3 days per week and they recently starting pretty much giving it away free through email (I guess it must be ad supported, I'm not subscribed 'cause non-tech news doesn't really interest me all that much).

I haven't read a traditional newspaper in years.
What they DON'T print in newspapers fills volumes.
In this 24/7 30 second sound bite world we live in, "who has time" to sit down for an hour or
more and read a paper?

naap51stang said,
I haven't read a traditional newspaper in years.
What they DON'T print in newspapers fills volumes.
In this 24/7 30 second sound bite world we live in, "who has time" to sit down for an hour or
more and read a paper?

I think the issue more now is that in a fast paced world like today, who has the time to sit down and read news from lastnight or yetsterday when they have what's happening right now, at their fingertips on their computers, phones and other devices.

Information comes so fast now that by the time the newspapers print it, it's old news. It's only good for those who don't go to those other sources or just missed it and want to sit down to something physical to read.

I think we'll have newspapers in the future but not many and mainly for the same reasons will play a NES or Atari or drive that old 67 camero or stang, etc...

I just can't see it. Yes, circulation will probably be greatly reduced and downscaled but the print newspaper will continue to exist.

Over here in the UK it's quite a classic image for a van driver (or someone like a builder who drives a van) to have a newspaper jammed down the back of the dashboard to read when he's on a break. Are you trying to tell me builders are going to have tablet PC's or Kindles to read the news rather than just picking up a copy of a newspaper? Not so sure on that one.

Chicane-UK said,
I just can't see it. Yes, circulation will probably be greatly reduced and downscaled but the print newspaper will continue to exist.

Over here in the UK it's quite a classic image for a van driver (or someone like a builder who drives a van) to have a newspaper jammed down the back of the dashboard to read when he's on a break. Are you trying to tell me builders are going to have tablet PC's or Kindles to read the news rather than just picking up a copy of a newspaper? Not so sure on that one.

+1

Also why does the article assume that America will be the first country to change?

Pauleh said,

+1

Also why does the article assume that America will be the first country to change?


Here in Philly we have the inquirer and daily news in economic crisis due to low sales. This is an indication that customers are finding their news online. Plus gadgets like the iPad and iPhone are making ever harder for print media to make money.