Dell ditches 25,000 BlackBerry's for Windows Phone 7

Dell Inc. said it plans to move 25,000 BlackBerry employees over to Windows Phone 7 starting next week. The move is a direct shot at Research In Motion in order to help promote its own Dell Venue Pro, running Windows Phone 7, in a report by The Wall Street Journal.

Now that both Dell and RIM are competing head-to-head, the decision to move their 25,000 employees over to Windows Phone 7 is the obvious choice. This move is not only to help promote Dell's own brand of Windows Phone 7, but to help cut costs, by up to 25% in mobile communication servers needed to run expensive BlackBerry service.

Dell also plans to begin marketing their Windows Phone 7 handset to business clients within the next two weeks, attempting to get them to ditch their BlackBerry's, iPhone's and Android handsets to make a similar switch.

Research In Motion passes this off as nothing more than a publicity stunt, "we find it highly unlikely that they will actually save any money with this move and far more likely they were looking for a little free publicity," said Mark Guibert, vice president for corporate marketing.

This move by Dell may trigger other Microsoft affiliated companies to make a similar switch, which could help promote Windows Phone 7 as a business phone, rather than a personal device.

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25 Comments

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I don't get how its unlikely they wont save money... we went from BES (blackberry's server) to an all exchange (which we had exchange as the mail server to start with) with windows mobile and Android phones and it saved us tens of thousands a year in support / hardware / software costs..

If I had the decision then i would choose to keep my employees on something I know works. Give the new Windows OS a while to prove itself as its your employees that will suffer if they are limited by the new device.

But if I was making decisions on behalf of Dell then I would already be a proven idiot so would jump straight on the bandwagon on of the new phone.

No surprise here. Dell has been part of the wintel monopoly from the very beginning. It promotes windows and microsoft at every opportunity.

Flawed said,
No surprise here. Dell has been part of the wintel monopoly from the very beginning. It promotes windows and microsoft at every opportunity.

Really? I think you need to Google this...

I actuallly thought about the same thing, but windows phone 7 does not have the policies control that you have on the destkop or the old version of windows. And I think is just a matter of updates to have all that on WP7. If the old version of windows had the capabilities, I really do not see no reason for WP7 not to have it.

Voice of Buddy Christ said,
One has to wonder how many of them will complain about the change.

Out of 2500 no doubt some, but thats the nature of change. Look at neowin whenever theres a proposed change or an actual change some dig it some get up in arms. Just the way it is.

This is a very bold move by Dell. The BES environment is comprehensive and allows for very granular control of all your devices, there is no such equivalent enterprise tool for managing Windows Phone 7 in bulk at present, not even close. Exchange 2007/10's Activesync policies are very basic and although you can manage your phone including remote wipe and location services through Windows Live for free, it's down to the end user to manage not the ICT department. I'm not sure this will save them any real money except they will become a their own best advert if this pulls off and of course a huge case study for Microsoft.

CtrlShift said,
This is a very bold move by Dell. The BES environment is comprehensive and allows for very granular control of all your devices, there is no such equivalent enterprise tool for managing Windows Phone 7 in bulk at present, not even close. Exchange 2007/10's Activesync policies are very basic and although you can manage your phone including remote wipe and location services through Windows Live for free, it's down to the end user to manage not the ICT department. I'm not sure this will save them any real money except they will become a their own best advert if this pulls off and of course a huge case study for Microsoft.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/C...Exchange_ActiveSync_Clients

All features will be available to Windows phone 7 soon.

There is a factor that I haven't seen anyone mention here. The vast majority of large enterprise is probably running their own Exchange environment. This is a HUGE deciding factor when you are comparing exchange active sync (EAS) to blackberry enterprise server (BES). In an enterprise when you consider the licensing costs involved as well as the support costs it's much cheaper to stay with EAS.

Another factor is that with EAS you are going to have a higher uptime because you are hosting everything EAS related yourself where with RIM you are totally dependent on their servers being up for your mobile e-mail to function. I can't tell you how many times RIM would be down and our users would be upset meanwhile all of our EAS users were online and working great.

xpablo said,
The death of Blackberry is near.

I doubt it, Dell isn't the only Blackberry user.

This is good for all of us as users, more competition = better and cheaper products

xpablo said,
The death of Blackberry is near.

I don't think so. I just think RIM needs to stop bollocking around with products like the Storm and the Style. They made their name through the Bold/Curve form factor, which people who buy BlackBerrys love. Their hardware keyboard is fantastic. It's the only reason I bought my 9700. The Torch is a 'maybe' area but I would never buy one, but all their other products are crap and stop them from putting real work into the phones people actually want from them. I have plenty of choice in manufacturers and operating systems if I want a 3.5" touch screen, but there's barely anything for someone who wants a portrait QWERTY because RIM make them so well.

25000 is hardly a dent to their numbers. Everybody getting on the BlackBerry is dying bandwagon is either a fanboy/troll or has no idea what theyre talking about. Companies lose customers every day.

homeboy rocketshoulders said,
25000 is hardly a dent to their numbers. Everybody getting on the BlackBerry is dying bandwagon is either a fanboy/troll or has no idea what theyre talking about. Companies lose customers every day.

Yet it hardly makes this level of news does it? This dell story has pretty much made it's way on all the tech news sites to the extent that you thought the number was 250,000 and not 25,000.

But the number isn't the point, the point is that dell, and even HP with their Palm buy, can sell a business everything right down to their mobile phones, something they didn't before which left a area for RIM to play in. Now that need for a company to even look at RIM is slowlly closing up when they can make a deal with HP/Dell to get all their backend hardware, PC/laptops, tablets if they want any, software and services, and now phones. That's the bigger picture and it's not like RIM can compete with that.

homeboy rocketshoulders said,
25000 is hardly a dent to their numbers.

25,000 is a fair amount though and remember, this number may very well much double if other companies also decide to "go with the flow" and pick up WP7.

well I can only talk from my own experience supporting small to medium sized companies, but adding even the free blackberry server express to an exchange installation is costly and takes time and patience. The software is horrible and gives you that feeling of messing with voodoo magic, when you get it working you just dont know how!

MS exchange active sync works out the box, blackberry add's layers of complexity (albeit adding more control, but how much control do you need?) - its not needed for most companies.

BGM said,
yeah it's really weird that they would give their own devices to their own employees rather then using another company..

I thought Dell is making 2 android devices right now, the Streak and Aero.
Even though both are really meh...
Only reason I see them going to WP7 rather then Android is because it isn't as secure, could be wrong though.

Auroka said,

I thought Dell is making 2 android devices right now, the Streak and Aero.
Even though both are really meh...
Only reason I see them going to WP7 rather then Android is because it isn't as secure, could be wrong though.

I agree, the openness of android is what makes business's shy away IMO, plus with ms you get the office stack integration with sharepoint, excel, word, powerpoint, CRM (future release), communicator - and whatever else comes with future updates.

The built in integration of exchange 2010/sharepoint 2010 and win phone 7 is very impressive!

http://www.msteched.com/2010/NorthAmerica/WPH202

duddit2 said,

I agree, the openness of android is what makes business's shy away IMO, plus with ms you get the office stack integration with sharepoint, excel, word, powerpoint, CRM (future release), communicator - and whatever else comes with future updates.

The built in integration of exchange 2010/sharepoint 2010 and win phone 7 is very impressive!

http://www.msteched.com/2010/NorthAmerica/WPH202

Considering most people think of Blackberry's as business phones, would make since for them to upgrade to a system that is more closely integrated with their current business model. Most of what they do is Windows related.