Fake Spotify app found on Windows Phone Marketplace

Microsoft's Windows Phone Marketplace isn't immune to having apps being uploaded that appear to be one thing but in fact are something else. WPCentral.com reports that seems to be the case with someone who has uploaded an app that appears at first to be the official Windows Phone version of Spotify. The app, which was actually made available to download on December 20, has the Spotify logo but costs 99 cents to download. The real Spotify app, which uses an icon instead of the logo, is free to download and was first released in November.

Whoever uploaded this app clearly wanted people to think they were downloading the real Spotify application. Instead, this imposter app simply offers up some news feeds and YouTube videos. It's not clear how this app got past Microsoft's Windows Phone Marketplace application process.

In any case, consumers should definitely be aware of this issue since it can cause some confusion, especially among non-tech savvy Windows Phone users who might think that Spotify would charge people to download an app for their streaming music service.

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You'd think the team testing this app would communicate with the developer..just a thought.

MS are not responsible for non-tech savvy people, but they are responsible for what goes on their Market.

Either way, this should wake the testing team up *smacks their heads*

coth said,
there are tones of different twitter clients on android market. what's the deal?
But "Twitter" app on android is by official twitter. However I don't think this is Microsoft fault since its not their responsibly to check that.

coth said,
there are tones of different twitter clients on android market. what's the deal?

No, you're not understanding this. The fake Spotify app is simply a RSS app that shows you news about Spotify. The name of the app is misleading. If it was a third-party Spotify app that used the Spotify API, then that would be fine.

tanjiajun_34 said,
But "Twitter" app on android is by official twitter. However I don't think this is Microsoft fault since its not their responsibly to check that.

What do you mean it's not their responsibility to check that? It's pretty scary that MS doesn't check this. They should verify the soruce of the submission, as well as review the content of the app. Making sure it doesn't crash Might as well make a chase app that steals usernames and passwords of chase customers. MS owns, runs and maintains the app store, this kind of nonsense shouldn't be allowed.

shockz said,

What do you mean it's not their responsibility to check that? It's pretty scary that MS doesn't check this. They should verify the soruce of the submission, as well as review the content of the app. Making sure it doesn't crash Might as well make a chase app that steals usernames and passwords of chase customers. MS owns, runs and maintains the app store, this kind of nonsense shouldn't be allowed.

Except apart from using the Spotify name this app does nothing malicious. If you were to create an app called 'Chase' that stole usernames/passwords that would be flagged as malicious content so it would get rejected.

ZakO said,

Except apart from using the Spotify name this app does nothing malicious. If you were to create an app called 'Chase' that stole usernames/passwords that would be flagged as malicious content so it would get rejected.

Given the goof ups, I'd be skeptical.

There's nothing in the certification that cares about "fake" applications. They just make sure it doesn't crash, and its not "malicious" in the sense that it's doing things users aren't expecting it to do.

Everything about this app probably passes all the certification requirements just fine. I don't really see this as news though, these plenty of these style of stupid chancer apps all over the Windows Phone marketplace for many other sites and buisness' and proper apps. Personally I just say ban all apps made using the template in the first place

zikalify said,
ms what do you do in the 2-3 day review LOL?

It's actually a genuine app (it doesn't perform anything malicious) other than a copied name, if you were to rename it, there would be nothing wrong with it. So it must be a case of the reviewer making a dodo when checking the name. I guess Spotify hasn't made THAT much impact in the U.S. after all?

~Johnny said,
There's nothing in the certification that cares about "fake" applications. They just make sure it doesn't crash, and its not "malicious" in the sense that it's doing things users aren't expecting it to do.

Everything about this app probably passes all the certification requirements just fine. I don't really see this as news though, these plenty of these style of stupid chancer apps all over the Windows Phone marketplace for many other sites and buisness' and proper apps. Personally I just say ban all apps made using the template in the first place

Nope, this app fails 3.1 of the approval certifications, "Licensed Content, Name, Logo & Trademarks"

Also, it possibly fails 2.11, "Your application and its associated metadata must accurately represent its functionality, capabilities and features."

The metadata's name "Spotify" suggests it plays music from Spotify, which it doesn't. Therefore the metadata isn't accurately representing the app's functionality.

~Johnny said,
There's nothing in the certification that cares about "fake" applications. They just make sure it doesn't crash, and its not "malicious" in the sense that it's doing things users aren't expecting it to do.

Everything about this app probably passes all the certification requirements just fine. I don't really see this as news though, these plenty of these style of stupid chancer apps all over the Windows Phone marketplace for many other sites and buisness' and proper apps. Personally I just say ban all apps made using the template in the first place


The Spotify name and logo are both trademarks ; thus, any other app that uses them is illegal.

Aethec said,

The Spotify name and logo are both trademarks ; thus, any other app that uses them is illegal.

"It is the application provider's responsibility to determine if the application provider has the right to use the chosen name, content, logos, copyright, trademarks, online services & API's."

On Microsoft's side of the certification policy, they do nothing themselves regarding copyright - and as can be seen waive the need to themselves check. It's not part of the certification policy for Microsoft to check, so on Microsoft's part, this is all fine. They only validify copyright directly relating to Microsoft products.

The metadata's name "Spotify" suggests it plays music from Spotify, which it doesn't. Therefore the metadata isn't accurately representing the app's functionality.

The applications description states what it does. Its metadata is fine from a certification point of view.

~Johnny said,

"It is the application provider's responsibility to determine if the application provider has the right to use the chosen name, content, logos, copyright, trademarks, online services & API's."

On Microsoft's side of the certification policy, they do nothing themselves regarding copyright - and as can be seen waive the need to themselves check. It's not part of the certification policy for Microsoft to check, so on Microsoft's part, this is all fine. They only validify copyright directly relating to Microsoft products.

The applications description states what it does. Its metadata is fine from a certification point of view.

First of all, this app does not play music from spotify, it just loads up a bunch of youtubes videos.

link6155 said,
First of all, this app does not play music from spotify, it just loads up a bunch of youtubes videos.

...and? The application does what it says. It says it "this application allows user to access to all new songs,trailors,lyrics new techs and news all in a same place in a single touch .to enjoy and entertain."

It does that. From Microsoft's certification viewpoint, there's nothing stopping them from accepting it here.

~Johnny said,

...and? The application does what it says. It says it "this application allows user to access to all new songs,trailors,lyrics new techs and news all in a same place in a single touch .to enjoy and entertain."

It does that. From Microsoft's certification viewpoint, there's nothing stopping them from accepting it here.

The NAME suggests that it plays music from Spotify. The name is a lie, and therefore fails the approval proccess. It should be called "Spotify Plus", "Spotify Extras", "Spotify News", or something else.

(I'm wondering why anyone even bought this app... seriously there's some dumb users I guess lol)

~Johnny said,
"It is the application provider's responsibility to determine if the application provider has the right to use the chosen name, content, logos, copyright, trademarks, online services & API's."

On Microsoft's side of the certification policy, they do nothing themselves regarding copyright - and as can be seen waive the need to themselves check. It's not part of the certification policy for Microsoft to check, so on Microsoft's part, this is all fine. They only validify copyright directly relating to Microsoft products.

The applications description states what it does. Its metadata is fine from a certification point of view.


This kind of app should fail the certification process as an exception (it is justifiable by the trademarks) because it's obvious there's going to be bad publicity for Microsoft.