LibreOffice, Intel joins the open source project

The Document Foundation recently announced that Intel started distributing LibreOffice on the AppUp Center, chipzilla’s app store for x86-based computers. Not just that: Intel joined the foundation itself, financially supporting the FOSS (free open source software) productivity suite that has become the only true competitor to Microsoft’s Office juggernaut.

Born as a fork from the now almost neglected OpenOffice.org project, LibreOffice features a full-fledged suite including a word processor, a spreadsheet, a presentation program and other essential software for personal and professional productivity.

The “special” version of LibreOffice released via the AppUp Center features five different languages (English, German, French, Spanish and Italian), a new “smooth, silent” installation and improved uninstallation processes and is based on the LibreOffice build made by open source company SUSE.

We are thrilled to add Intel to our existing roster of supporters”, TDF board member volunteer Florian Effenberger said, explaining that “TDF is first and foremost a vendor neutral project committed to excellence in the office suite space, but we greatly value the support and advice we gain from organisations such as SUSE, Red Hat, Google, the Free Software Foundation (FSF) and Software in the Public Interest (SPI)”.

Dawn Foster, open source community lead for Intel, stated that the corporation’s engineers “have worked with the LibreOffice codebase to optimise it for Intel hardware”, and that “adding it to the AppUp Center is an obvious extension, and will provide an exciting feature for all Ultrabook users”.

And what about Microsoft? Its foremost ally in the IT industry started giving money and coding help to one of its few “real” competitors in the productivity software field, so it’s easy to speculate that the latest Intel move will not be greeted happily at Redmond.

Report a problem with article
Previous Story

Interview: Zombie talks about Blacklight Retribution

Next Story

Sinofsky once again pegged as successor to Ballmer

24 Comments

Commenting is disabled on this article.

Competition is good for Microsoft; keeping them on their toes. My professional career is affected by Office sales and when i read that Oracle killed OpenOffice my first thought was: Who will challeng Microsoft now?

So how are hardcore Linux people surviving without using MS Office at all for work/posting resumes/college documents ?

vron247 said,
So how are hardcore Linux people surviving without using MS Office at all for work/posting resumes/college documents ?

Poorly. They're unemployed, barely scrapping through their existing part-time employment, and getting barely-passing academic grades.

Kids using Office 2010 Home And Student, however, are actually able to dazzle folks with their PowerPoint skillz.

_Heracles said,
I can make a doc/docx in a few minutes that will not work on LibreTrololoffice

Have you got all the features though? And I am just asking out of curiousity

Riva said,

Have you got all the features though? And I am just asking out of curiousity

I am not sure what you are asking. Some things will just render wrong on LibreOffice, horribly wrong.

I haven't even used all the features of docx

This will be really important when LibreOffice catches up to Office 97 in about 10 years. Then you will see 10s of 20s of people running to download it with their 33.6k modems to use on their 1994 Pentium based Linux builds.

If anyone thinks that people are going to give up 20 years of new features and the stability of Office for a buggy mangled suite that is just now catching up to Word and Excel circa 1991, they are out of their minds.

Sure the 'I'm a geek too' crowd will love this stuff, but in the real world, people like what MS Office does especially when it has features nothing else in the world offers.

Ask Munich how well getting people to give up Microsoft Office works in the real world.

There are always employees that have a project that 'needs' a feature from MS Office, or employees that can't live without a specific Office application.

thenetavenger said,
This will be really important when LibreOffice catches up to Office 97 in about 10 years. Then you will see 10s of 20s of people running to download it with their 33.6k modems to use on their 1994 Pentium based Linux builds.

If anyone thinks that people are going to give up 20 years of new features and the stability of Office for a buggy mangled suite that is just now catching up to Word and Excel circa 1991, they are out of their minds.

Sure the 'I'm a geek too' crowd will love this stuff, but in the real world, people like what MS Office does especially when it has features nothing else in the world offers.

Ask Munich how well getting people to give up Microsoft Office works in the real world.

There are always employees that have a project that 'needs' a feature from MS Office, or employees that can't live without a specific Office application.

Man, if you had a Pentium in 1994, you were really lucky! I was still running on a 33MHz 486DX. But yeah, you're right, LibreOffice is very poor in comparison to MS Office. It doesn't have the stability, integration, compatibility or even consistency of MS Office. You get what you pay for.

Shadrack said,
Did you fall asleep in the 90's and just wake up?

It hasn't disappeared, WordPerfect Office is still being produced. Corel owns it now.

I'm confused, see this was on the forums about a week ago, yet has only JUST made front page news.... Why the delay ?

n_K said,
I'm confused, see this was on the forums about a week ago, yet has only JUST made front page news.... Why the delay ?

Because I was lazy as f*ck to write a news I planned to write just a week ago? :-P

I hate LibreOffice. I find it to have very poor performance and a really retro look. Opening any type of complex spreadsheed, or large CSV file, is very painful. No wonder this junk is free.

Vannos said,
I hate LibreOffice. I find it to have very poor performance and a really retro look. Opening any type of complex spreadsheed, or large CSV file, is very painful. No wonder this junk is free.

Pros use Office. Retro look? You mean like 95% of Windows applications? LibreOffice works great for MOST people. MOST people don't have complex spreadsheets or large CSV file.

Edited by gcaw, Feb 28 2012, 6:16pm :

I did draw comparisons to Office (because thats the high water mark for office software) and for me Office is much better. 'Pros' generally use what their company provides, which for me is currently LibreOffice.

Edited by gcaw, Feb 28 2012, 6:59pm :

farmeunit said,

Pros use Office. Retro look? You mean like 95% of Windows applications? LibreOffice works great for MOST people. MOST people don't have complex spreadsheets or large CSV file.


Most people do not know about Word Pad.

Edited by gcaw, Feb 28 2012, 6:36pm :

All these companies stabbing Microsoft in the back, yet Microsoft is hamstrung by litigation hungry companies from protecting their properties by truly integrating them into their OS. Without Microsoft Intel would not be where they are today. Dicks.

efjay said,
Without Microsoft Intel would not be where they are today.

And arguably, the same statement holds if you swap both parties. Ever hear of the term "Wintel"?

(Good thing I think both are still great companies, and contribute a significant amount to R&D, benefiting everyone in the industry - not just themselves... *cough* Apple *cough*)

Breakthrough said,

And arguably, the same statement holds if you swap both parties. Ever hear of the term "Wintel"?

(Good thing I think both are still great companies, and contribute a significant amount to R&D, benefiting everyone in the industry - not just themselves... *cough* Apple *cough*)

Except that Windows NT ran really well on Alpha, PowerPC, and MIPS, which angered Intel in the 90s, even though NT was developed on Intel i860 (RISC) simulators.

Intel HATED Microsoft, and if wasn't for the anti-trust lawsuit and the fact it would have destroyed AMD, Microsoft would have dumped x86 when they saw NT 4.0 was faster than Win95 with 32mb of RAM.

Intel hated Microsoft for the video codec and DSP work and the driver model in Windows 3.x that removed the application device dependence that had benefited Intel for many years.

Microsoft didn't need Intel then, and still don't.

The whole refocusing on NT's portability with Windows 8 and the ARM thing has Intel on edge again, breaking the repaired relationship.

Intel is all too 'happy' to continue using Microsoft CPU/GPU integration technologies in their upcoming SoC designs. They also were 'happy' about the move from being tied to x86, as Intel has tried to break away from it several times, and this is the perfect time for them to focus their CPU work on something new again.

I wonder if Intel really cares, is using this as some political move, or just a few execs are funneling money to friends with a pet project or are hedging their bets in case something does ever happen to Microsoft.