Microsoft answers some Windows 8 app questions

With Microsoft now soliciting app developers to submit their Windows 8 app creations to the company for publishing in the Windows Store, there's naturally some questions that those developers might have in terms of making apps for the new Metro user interface.

In a new post on the official Windows 8 app developers blog, Microsoft attempts to answer some popular questions from app developers, taken from Microsoft's forums.

One question that was asked by a developer was, “What's the best way to create a multi-language app?” The blog states:

Customers will be more likely to download and use the apps in their language. The Windows Store for developers blog recently announced additional global coverage including new languages, and new markets for submitting and buying apps. Regardless of the Windows Store markets you make your app available to, your app must meet Certification requirements for Windows apps. Make sure that your app is appropriate for a global audience and that your app name is unique across the Windows Store catalog. Decide in which languages you will provide technical support.

Microsoft provided a number of code examples, documents and other files in the blog post to help answer how to make a multi-language app for Windows 8. Other questions that were answered in the post related to accessing settings and data in an app, along with how to change and customize the color and style of an app.

Microsoft ended the blog post by saying, "As soon as the upcoming Release Preview is available, links in this post (and other content in Windows Dev Center) will contain updated info to keep you productive. We couldn’t do it without your feedback and questions, so please keep posting in the Metro style apps forums, and let us know if you can’t find something you need."

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15 Comments

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KomaWeiß said,
I wish they would allow C++ D:.

C++ is a first-class citizen in Metro app development. Research a little bit more next time.

KomaWeiß said,
I wish they would allow C++ D:.

Yeah, you can program in C++ with XAML for the UI's, or C++ with DirectX - or create your libraries in C++ and use HTML & JS for the UI.

sanke1 said,
Anything and any language apart from Java would do. Flash and Java are 2 things devs should boycott this instant.

Add objective-c to that list...

I'd like them to answer why they're putting so much emphasis on JS & HTML apps and not on applications written in XAML & C# / VB, or even C++. It's even more ridiculous when you try to go through the documentation and find out nearly all of it is for JS, and not bread and butter Windows programming languages that the vast majority of experienced Windows developers are used too.

~Johnny said,
I'd like them to answer why they're putting so much emphasis on JS & HTML apps and not on applications written in XAML & C# / VB, or even C++. It's even more ridiculous when you try to go through the documentation and find out nearly all of it is for JS, and not bread and butter Windows programming languages that the vast majority of experienced Windows developers are used too.

I would imagine that they are courting mobile app developers.

blackjezuz said,

I would imagine that they are courting mobile app developers.

Most of whom code in objective C or Java, so would be better off with C++ and C# than web technologies?

~Johnny said,

Most of whom code in objective C or Java, so would be better off with C++ and C# than web technologies?


I know, it's frustrating. But all of the example programs I've looked at were available in C# and JS.

Seems they are courting web developers.

~Johnny said,
I'd like them to answer why they're putting so much emphasis on JS & HTML apps and not on applications written in XAML & C# / VB, or even C++. It's even more ridiculous when you try to go through the documentation and find out nearly all of it is for JS, and not bread and butter Windows programming languages that the vast majority of experienced Windows developers are used too.

I think it's exactly because of the vast majority of experienced Windows developers are C#/.NET that they're not focusing on that area so hugely in examples. Granted, the documentation needs to be up to scratch in all areas, but JS & HTML is the new thing, and it needs the most explanation. There's less of a need to explain existing technology, and more of a need to explain the JS&HTML stuff.

But I agree, it does rather annoy me. Needs more C#/XAML focus.

If you're going to paraphrase articles and add zero value, at least pick articles in which most Windows users are interested...

I hope that the Release Preview allows to run more than 9 apps at the same time, and not close each other after that number is hit.

Jose_49 said,
I hope that the Release Preview allows to run more than 9 apps at the same time, and not close each other after that number is hit.

It seems pointless to have any limit, as the design is built around suspended states and auto-memory reclamation. The biggest issue is that the Metro app switcher is simply not up to the job and if Metro apps didn't auto-close apps then alt-tab would quickly become unusable.

Then how are we going to manage when we start using several apps. I myself have around 15 applications opened at the same time, which I use for faster look up.