Microsoft increases OneDrive For Business storage space to 1TB per user

Microsoft is giving current users of its OneDrive for Business service a really big boost in file space. Starting today, the default cloud storage amount has been increased from 25GB to 1TB per user.

The Office blog also reports that everyone who subscribes to Office 365 ProPlus will get access to 1TB of OneDrive for Business storage as well, again per user. Microsoft says they will offer help to business that wish to migrate data from their current cloud storage service to OneDrive for Business. These new changes come on the heels of Microsoft launching a standalone version of OneDrive for Business a few weeks ago, without the need to get a Office 365 subscription.

The blog post also indirectly comments about competing cloud storage services such as Dropbox, which recently announced a way to link personal and business accounts. Microsoft says that its OneDrive for Business service offers companies a "holistic and comprehensive approach" that includes native integration with Office programs and documents, along with other features. The blog ended by Microsoft stating, "The cloud is about breaking down walls between people and information. Not building a new set of islands in the sky."

Source: Microsoft | Image via Microsoft

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9 Comments

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Sadly OneDrive for Business is based on SharePoint 2013, with a lot of limitations and failures. Not even a Mac client exists.

The "standard" OneDrive is much better. And of course, Dropbox is better than both.

Sorry my english.

McDave said,
Putting that much company data on the cloud is asking for trouble.

How is it different to companies using Dropbox and Box? Onedrive at least offers more protected sharing and DRM in Office online.

It depends on the type of data, and as with all forms of data storage, the balance between risk of loss from theft vs risk of loss from corruption is to be judged by the user.

McDave said,
Putting that much company data on the cloud is asking for trouble.

Not sure what is the trouble? not like the companies invented telepathy or teleportation :) they all have sales data, customer data, many files of plans to be done, tons of files of things done and no one will look at them anymore, etc.

Just file, they are all the same

Audien said,

How is it different to companies using Dropbox and Box? Onedrive at least offers more protected sharing and DRM in Office online.

Its not different and he wasn't singling out OneDrive. The issue with my industry and cloud storage is the various NDAs we sign with all of our clients. Some of us were bypassing our corporate file transfer tool and sending clients files over DropBox for convenience and got the smack down when one of our client's lawyers found out about it. There is just too much uncertainty with what the owner's of the cloud storage system will do with the files on it.

It all has to do with the type of files you are working with and what the sensitivity of them are. In the case of my company's clients I think they were in the right to criticize our usage of DropBox. We signed the NDA with them and know what the terms are, but nobody at DropBox signed a compatible privacy agreement nor would they. The same would apply to MS or anyone, really. I'd say that the vast majority of corporations want as much control over their digital property as possible, and cloud storage isn't really compatible with that goal.

There are huge issues with security and its oversight but that's not really with I meant. Provisioning internet access for users with up to 2TB online storage is mammoth.

john.smith_2084 said,

Not sure what is the trouble? not like the companies invented telepathy or teleportation :) they all have sales data, customer data, many files of plans to be done, tons of files of things done and no one will look at them anymore, etc.

Just file, they are all the same

If a company puts these kind of files on "cloud" (no matter who offers the service) I'd personally never would use said companies services. These files should stay on local premises and on a local network and/or local backups.