Microsoft: We will ship a full Windows 8 'Modern' version of Office ... someday

As we reported earlier today, Microsoft has now listed the newly released Office 2013 as a desktop app in the Windows Store section of Windows 8. However, most of the new software applications in the Office suite still run on the desktop UI of both Windows 8 and Windows RT.

So, where is the version of Office made to run on the 'Modern' UI of Windows 8 and RT. In an interview with Mashable, Microsoft's vice president of Office program management P.J. Hough, said the company does have plans to offer such a product someday. He stated, "We're committed to delivering a full set of Office experiences on Windows 8."

In fact, two Office software applications, OneNote and Lync, are available as full Windows 8/RT apps already. Hough stated:

We've gotten a lot of experience from OneNote and Lync, and we're going to continue down that path ... How do you integrate with the new features of the operating system — the charms, for example? How do you take advantage of the new navigation? what do you do differently if you presume cloud-backed storage first? We've added a lot of those capabilities to Office, but we decided not to rush and just jam something in.

It's safe to say that Microsoft will launch full "Modern" Windows 8 versions of Word, PowerPoint and Excel at some point, but the question is, "When?" We suspect that it's going to be a long while before it happens.

Source: Mashable | Image via Microsoft

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FAIL!
hahaha now why others like example Adobe would bother to produce "modern ui PS" when MS it self don't give a **** about their own Apps LOL

You're calling fail because if Microsoft DID introduce Office 2013 as entirely ModernUI, you'd run (not walk) to Google Docs/Apps - trying to convince yourself that it's just as good - even, if not especially, if it STILL lacks an e-mail application - simply because you despise ModernUI.

sinis said,
FAIL!
hahaha now why others like example Adobe would bother to produce "modern ui PS" when MS it self don't give a **** about their own Apps LOL

Ignorance is amusing...

You have no concept of how large and complex Office Applications are. They are also more than just the Applications you see being used, they are a full development platform that software companies create custom solutions on top of for enterprise/corporate customers.

Even comparing Adobe's product shows you don't grasp how extensive the functionality and what is underneath the simple Wordprocessor you see as Word or the simple spreadsheet you see as Excel.

It wasn't that long ago that Word was deemed the most 'complex' (in features/coding) piece of software in existence.

Let me repeat that for you...

It wasn't that long ago that Word was deemed the most 'complex' (in features/coding) piece of software in existence.
*This title now goes to Windows.

Go look up Apps people build on Office, from full Photoshop like painting Applications running in Excel to brilliant office management systems running on Access and Word. That is the ecosystem/platform that is Office.

Just the fact that Microsoft was so easily able to recompile them for ARM and have them work so flawlessly on Windows RT is impressive, and a testament to Microsoft compiler and development technologies. (Let alone run them faster than simple Apps do on Android and iOS on lower end hardware.)

I hope this "modern" version of office won't be forced upon us like the start screen was. Thinking of having such a horrible UI in a productivity suite is awful. And it's not like it's great on Windows.

Hey Microsoft,

There is nothing "modern" about your new "start menu". It's different, but it ain't anything close to "modern".

Perfect for them to introduce this to yearly subscribers ONLY then make everyone else wait until the next version.

Better get your copies of Office 2010, while you still can--most especially if you are going to be using laptops and desktops for several years.

gb8080 said,
Fullscreen only isn't "modern". Just like the old pre-WIMP days 25 years ago.
Not metro but retro.

This is where people get confused...

There is a difference between one visible application and the ability to run only one application. You cannot associate multi-tasking and application flipping/cycling to non-full screen rectangles all visible on the screen at once.

Most users work full screen, even with a Desktop Application. This does not mean other software does not run well in the background and it also does not mean it 'hard' or out of the workflow for the user to flip/swtich between applications - which Windows 8 makes easy rather brilliantly.

There are true application models that don't work well in the Modern UI, but they are few and many can be redesigned to take on the nature of the Modern UI and work even better in the same context.

The best things about multiple Windows on the screen at once were features less that .05% of people ever used, sadly. If everyone was dragging and dropping text and images between Applications and using the Win95 design UI as intended, Microsoft probably wouldn't have just moved past that model to the Modern UI.

However, they did and all that functionality is there, but done differently now. There is the sidebar for dragging dropping and the charms share and new dialog concepts that launch other Apps instead of offering a dialog box and other simplistic ideas that become rather powerful are far more effective and likely to be used by consumers.


thenetavenger said,

Most users work full screen, even with a Desktop Application. This does not mean other software does not run well in the background and it also does not mean it 'hard' or out of the workflow for the user to flip/swtich between applications - which Windows 8 makes easy rather brilliantly.

Sorry but I don't know why you assert "most users" work full screen, still less where your 0.05% figure comes from (it seems suspiciously like it's made up).
I routinely work with several Word documents open (the one I'm writing, the one I'm answering) and one or more other windows (web browser and/or pdfs) containing relevant material. I want to be able to see them at the same time. It's my normal work, and I don't think I'm unusual.

Full screen only is really disappointing.
Also consider games - the Win7 freecell, solitaire etc were ideal in a small window for a quick fix. Now gone in WIn8 and the App store versions are all full screen. Awful. Why have we regressed so far that they can't be windowed any more??

Anyway, I'm using WIn8 desktop with Start8 and up for a Surface Pro, so maybe this doesn't affect me so much.
But calling full-screen-only "Modern" is just so ... false and wrong.

Edited by gb8080, Jan 31 2013, 10:54am :

gb8080 said,

Sorry but I don't know why you assert "most users" work full screen, still less where your 0.05% figure comes from (it seems suspiciously like it's made up).

Go read the developing Windows blog.

Telemetry tells Microsoft that .05% of people actually use windows that aren't maximized.
This wasn't designed in the dark.
Maybe if you so called technical elite didn't turn off telemetry, then MS could properly account for you statistically.

deadonthefloor said,

Telemetry tells Microsoft that .05% of people actually use windows that aren't maximized.
This wasn't designed in the dark.
Maybe if you so called technical elite didn't turn off telemetry, then MS could properly account for you statistically.

This screams to me that there is something wrong with the telemetry, or the question being asked, or the way the results are being reported.
Most Win7 apps when installed run windowed on startup by default, including most MS ones. So about 100% of users will have used windowed apps.
Is this statistic the number of people who have NEVER EVER run a window that wasn't maximized? Or what? What - exactly - is the question to which 0.05% is the answer??
If we take it at face value then it means you might as well stop calling the product Windows and just call it "Screen".

The settings UI in the current version of the OneNote Windows Store app suggest that you'll one day have to use an Office 365 subscription to use it.

I wonder how different the interface will be in order to provide a smooth touch experience without sacrificing efficiency. I haven't seen Office RT yet.

Probably not too different. Check out the OneNote modern app you can get from the Windows Store They might just replace the ribbon with the new wheel menu (which is awesome)

slimjeezy said,
I wonder how different the interface will be in order to provide a smooth touch experience without sacrificing efficiency. I haven't seen Office RT yet.

They might use an evolved kind of radial menus, similar to the one I One Note/Metro.

j2006 said,
Probably not too different. Check out the OneNote modern app you can get from the Windows Store They might just replace the ribbon with the new wheel menu (which is awesome)

Hopefully the OneNote App is not the guide for how Office Metro will work, it's so limited...

Fritzly said,

They might use an evolved kind of radial menus, similar to the one I One Note/Metro.

Yes, hopefully more like the ones from last years concept videos.

deadonthefloor said,

Yes, hopefully more like the ones from last years concept videos.

Do you mean Office 2016 and the one that followed? I would pay a lot to have an OS lke the one portrayed in the clips..... not to mention the phone... :-)

slimjeezy said,
I wonder how different the interface will be in order to provide a smooth touch experience without sacrificing efficiency. I haven't seen Office RT yet.

In the final version of Office 2013/365, turn on Touch Mode. It expands things out so that even without a Stylus, it is rather easy to work on even complex projects using just touch. The Ribbon even if a bit cramped is a brilliant concept for touch, as it doesn't 'nest' things inside Menus and Dialogs.

Awesome I'm glad they didn't rush it.

Also - this is a major benefit of Office 365 - you get the latest apps for everything and allows them to refresh and release products more quicker instead of making users wait every 3-4 years.

j2006 said,
Awesome I'm glad they didn't rush it.

Also - this is a major benefit of Office 365 - you get the latest apps for everything and allows them to refresh and release products more quicker instead of making users wait every 3-4 years.


The issue some people could have with it is " what if I do not like the latest evolution?" Business users will surely have a way to decide to move to the latest release pr not and also when and how doing it.

Omen1393 said,
Not until we have a way to have two documents open at the same time...

but according to Metro UI style such 'window(s)' can't be called as "Immersive" anymore ...

Omen1393 said,
Not until we have a way to have two documents open at the same time...

/sarcasm on

Ya, cause Microsoft hasn't figured out a way to do this.. Just look at IE10 *gasp*
/sarcasm off

Oh wait, IE10 and other applications do allow multiple pages/documents to be open at the same time. I bet Microsoft could figure out a similar UI construct for Word, they seem to be fairly smart about THEIR OWN UI.

I agree. Never really understood the point in OneNote until I could carry it around with me and use it properly in meetings etc. (Handwriting recognition in Win8 is amazing btw). I imagine a "Modern" version of Power Point would be similarly useful. Word's fine on the desktop, but something that doesn't lend itself at all well to touch in it's current form is Excel. It's virtually impossible to use without a mouse. A "Modern" version of that would be great. Glad they're working on it.

Perhaps more functional and less chunky, clunky versions of Mail and Calendar would be nice too.

MikadoWu said,
I love the Modern Version of OneNote way better then the Desktop OneNote. Love to see what that come up with.

I Love one note too. If there was any 7 inches windows tablet I wouldn't hesitate a minute to buy one. One note is saving my life everyday. Its just amazing.

So if you prefer the Metro version of OneNote, you are okay with not being able to do quick scribbles or handwrite with a finger or capacitive stylus? Not being able to change pen color? Not being able to convert handwriting to text? Or do any free-form highlighting? Or record audio while taking notes (only possible in the Windows 8 desktop OneNote, and not RT unfortunately).

The fact is, Microsoft has thrown the baby out with the bathwater for a touchscreen OneNote that isn't even more touch-friendly than the 'non-touch' version.

I mean, is there really much of a difference between these two in terms of tablet usability? And if so, is that REALLY worth losing all of the uniqueness contained within the program?
http://i.imgur.com/n83pNG7.png
http://i.imgur.com/2GlVqz6.png

Dan Morrissey said,
I agree. Never really understood the point in OneNote until I could carry it around with me and use it properly in meetings etc. (Handwriting recognition in Win8 is amazing btw). I imagine a "Modern" version of Power Point would be similarly useful. Word's fine on the desktop, but something that doesn't lend itself at all well to touch in it's current form is Excel. It's virtually impossible to use without a mouse. A "Modern" version of that would be great. Glad they're working on it.

Perhaps more functional and less chunky, clunky versions of Mail and Calendar would be nice too.

Actually I have always been able to use handwriting with OneNote and Outlook since XP Tablet arrived. Granted with W7 the experience was greatly improved.

Dan Morrissey said,
I agree. Never really understood the point in OneNote until I could carry it around with me and use it properly in meetings etc. (Handwriting recognition in Win8 is amazing btw). I imagine a "Modern" version of Power Point would be similarly useful. Word's fine on the desktop, but something that doesn't lend itself at all well to touch in it's current form is Excel. It's virtually impossible to use without a mouse. A "Modern" version of that would be great. Glad they're working on it.

Perhaps more functional and less chunky, clunky versions of Mail and Calendar would be nice too.

You should of had a TabletPC many years ago. Handwriting Recognition in Vista and Win7 were amazing as well, and working with OneNote in this fashion was magnificent and still is.

The desktop version of OneNote still has functionality that is important that the Modern version does not. Like the tracking features, where you can do video/audio recording and it links to the notes you taking in the recoding timeline. So when you were writing 'scribbles' you can go back to the audio at point and see what was being said in case you couldn't read your handwriting.

OneNote for Modern is a good start, but not a complete solution, nor a full replacement.

thenetavenger said,

You should of had a TabletPC many years ago. Handwriting Recognition in Vista and Win7 were amazing as well, and working with OneNote in this fashion was magnificent and still is.

The problem though is that it wasn't really possible to get the hardware to where it needed to be until recently. Until the Asus (whose model name is escaping me at the moment) and last year's Samsung Series 7, almost all of the hardware was too large, heavy, and/or unwieldy for a portable device; those that weren't just didn't have the performance they needed.

jhoff80 said,

The problem though is that it wasn't really possible to get the hardware to where it needed to be until recently. Until the Asus (whose model name is escaping me at the moment) and last year's Samsung Series 7, almost all of the hardware was too large, heavy, and/or unwieldy for a portable device; those that weren't just didn't have the performance they needed.


It is partially true for the first wave of of Tablet, the ones with XP, although they were not heavier than any other laptop of the time. I bought Tablets since they came out and never missed a laptop.

This is why RT has a desktop, Just for Office.
MS have not worked out how to do Metro Office.

It is interesting considering they are already way down the Metro/Modern path.

derekaw said,
MS have not worked out how to do Metro Office.
They have already worked out a way, it's just in development right now.

The thing is that even when they get metro versions of office out they will still start to change the desktop and metro itself more to where they start to overlap in both look but also features.

derekaw said,
This is why RT has a desktop, Just for Office.
MS have not worked out how to do Metro Office.

It is interesting considering they are already way down the Metro/Modern path.

And all the other features of the OS that are only accessible through the desktop and traditional Win32 software. Windows RT is not just a mobile OS, it is full Windows 8. There are tons of settings and functionality that are not exposed by the modern UI, which is why the desktop UI is still present and available, and probably will be even on RT devices for another generation or two.

It is really silly to think that Office is the reason Microsoft ALSO kept all the other features of Windows 8 visible and available to users.

Please, think this through, there is far more to Windows RT's desktop than allow Office to run.

It's 'nice' to see MS decided to go ahead with metro and then figure things out as they go along even with their own products...

Breach said,
It's 'nice' to see MS decided to go ahead with metro and then figure things out as they go along even with their own products...

Hey guys! I found someone who doesn't understand the divisions within Microsoft! Over here! Let's stare!

Joshie said,
Hey guys! I found someone who doesn't understand the divisions within Microsoft!

Now now.
To be fair, it seems a lot of this is due to Sinofsky.
Julie Larson Green is supposed to tear down the silos and get divisions working in tandem.
only time will tell.

deadonthefloor said,

Now now.
To be fair, it seems a lot of this is due to Sinofsky.
Julie Larson Green is supposed to tear down the silos and get divisions working in tandem.
only time will tell.

Sure, we all want it until they do it, then suddenly public opinion does a 180 and everyone thinks they're an expert on the Sherman Act.

Joshie said,

Hey guys! I found someone who doesn't understand the divisions within Microsoft! Over here! Let's stare!

Do you mean the restructuring that Ballmer and,at the time his protege', Sinofsky implemented? I said before it and I am repeating it now: Sinofsky is,the,McNamara or the 21st Century.

Breach said,
It's 'nice' to see MS decided to go ahead with metro and then figure things out as they go along even with their own products...

It's the reason Sinofsky was outed, as he refused to work with other departments within Microsoft. The Office team was unaware of the Surface / Windows RT until relatively late into development and didn't have time to fully integrate Office into the tablet experience.

I'm glad they didn't just rush it. I LOVE the OneNote app and the Office for Windows Phone apps, so I'm expecting great things for this

Obviously. I truly believe that Windows RT would have shipped without the desktop *if* and *only if* Office was available from the get go for the Modern UI.

If that is the case then I'm glad Office held them back. It's great to have the desktop available when you want to perform more technical tasks on your Surface.

jakem1 said,
If that is the case then I'm glad Office held them back. It's great to have the desktop available when you want to perform more technical tasks on your Surface.

You realize that Desktop Mode in RT version doesn't support any application apart from office right? so what you saying is pointless.

S3P€hR said,

You realize that Desktop Mode in RT version doesn't support any application apart from office right? so what you saying is pointless.

This is incorrect. It supports a large variety of Microsoft signed applications including Office, Internet Explorer (desktop), File Explorer, Remote Desktop, Calculator, Paint, Control Panel, NotePad, Windows Speech Recognition (which is pretty awesome), Command Prmpt, Task Manager, Windows Defender, Windows PowerShell etc. etc.

S3P€hR said,

You realize that Desktop Mode in RT version doesn't support any application apart from office right? so what you saying is pointless.

Oh, man, and I thought people on neowin are powerusers.

eddman said,

Oh, man, and I thought people on neowin are powerusers.


Oh yea? perhaps some poweruser can tell me the differences between Traditional architecture vs Windows RT. correct me if I am wrong. Can you install any traditional application on RT? Do you have access to Win32 API?

Edited by trojan_market, Jan 30 2013, 8:44pm :

LookitsPuck said,

This is incorrect. It supports a large variety of Microsoft signed applications including Office, Internet Explorer (desktop), File Explorer, Remote Desktop, Calculator, Paint, Control Panel, NotePad, Windows Speech Recognition (which is pretty awesome), Command Prmpt, Task Manager, Windows Defender, Windows PowerShell etc. etc.

Have you ever installed paint or windows explorer on your machine or they come preinstalled and as features of windows? Perhaps I phrased it badly. I meant you cannot install any traditional desktop application on RT.

S3P€hR said,

Have you ever installed paint or windows explorer on your machine or they come preinstalled and as features of windows? Perhaps I phrased it badly. I meant you cannot install any traditional desktop application on RT.

It was just the way you phrased it.

Although there is an unlock available that you can install desktop applications. Of course assuming that they're compiled for ARM.

It has local group policy,powershell etc thats unique amoung all tablets. I do however wish it could be joined to a domain and RSAT installed.

It was the selling feature for me.

S3P€hR said,

Oh yea? perhaps some poweruser can tell me the differences between Traditional architecture vs Windows RT. correct me if I am wrong. Can you install any traditional application on RT? Do you have access to Win32 API?

Yes, you cannot install any desktop applications, but you are missing the whole point of having a desktop, if you think it has no use besides installing programs.

A hint; administrative tools, and more.

LookitsPuck said,

It was just the way you phrased it.

Although there is an unlock available that you can install desktop applications. Of course assuming that they're compiled for ARM.


I don't know about that. but I can clearly say such unlock (I would call it crack) couldn't be reliable. I suggest people get used to modern app and WinRT API instead of desperately finding a way to the old fortress of the windows. The whole Idea of Windows Presentation Foundation(XAML) is that it make sure application runs perfectly fine and seamless on different resolutions, screen sizes, devices and etc. Start embracing full screen applications. I was resisting too but I finally realized the new apps has superior architecture.

LookitsPuck said,
....a large variety of Microsoft signed applications....Powershell.....

If only the ISE was signed and recompiled for ARM.
That makes me want to sell my surface.

This is true though. Microsoft signing is the only measure preventing desktop applicaion installs of ARM binaries.

I can see the ecosystem going in one of two directions.
Either MS put more digital signatures into their trust heirarchy to enable the top tier desktop application developers to sign their own binaries, or two, removal of the desktop from RT.

Just because it doesn't support anything other than Office and other built-in Windows applications doesn't make it any unnecessary. There's still plenty of utility to be had from it as it is. I mean, have you ever needed to write a paper with multiple sources that required looking at two or three browser windows and Word at the same time?

Or given a PowerPoint without having to reference external data of some kind?

And that's not mentioning all the things you can do with PowerShell, Explorer, and many other of the built-in applications.

I mean, I don't get it... if you don't want to see the desktop... don't use it. That doesn't mean they have to get rid of it for those of us who get a ton of use out of it, whether they do so with touch (with the current Office apps) or a keyboard and mouse.

S3P€hR said,

I don't know about that. but I can clearly say such unlock (I would call it crack) couldn't be reliable. I suggest people get used to modern app and WinRT API instead of desperately finding a way to the old fortress of the windows. The whole Idea of Windows Presentation Foundation(XAML) is that it make sure application runs perfectly fine and seamless on different resolutions, screen sizes, devices and etc. Start embracing full screen applications. I was resisting too but I finally realized the new apps has superior architecture.

I am not referring specifically to Windows RT, my question is in general, broad terms, but why people should get use to something? If what you offer is something I see useful and appealing to me I will embrace it, if not.... well I do not have to get used to it, you will have to adapt your offer in a way to satisfy my desires.

LookitsPuck said,
Obviously. I truly believe that Windows RT would have shipped without the desktop *if* and *only if* Office was available from the get go for the Modern UI.

Um, No...

Here is why Surface RT has a desktop. It is Windows 8, and there are a lot of features and functionality that are NOT exposed by the Modern UI that are useful and necessary.

If Microsoft had fully replaced every element of settings and features from the desktop so they were available inside the modern UI, they then might have shipped without the desktop 'visible'.

However, even in that context, the desktop is still there, even if it was hidden from the user. (Desktop I mean the frameworks associated with traditional applications and features of the OS.)

Even WP8 technically still has the 'desktop', it is just not visible to the users.

People forget that you can use Explorer and can change device and network settings and all the traditional OS features and tweaks in Windows RT, as it is just Windows 8.

So Office aside, it comes down to replicating all the other features and functionality to be made available through the modern UI for Microsoft to ship Windows RT without the desktop.

Additionally, it would be silly for MS to remove the desktop functionality for users that think 'file management' and other concepts in the traditional terms and don't like the managed concept Modern uses that removes this control from the users.

GP007 said,

I think we'll see outlook before this year is over.

I strongly doubt.. Besides what kind of Oulook, as well as other Office programs, will be released in Metro? Full fledged or "children of a lesser God" as it is One Note/Metro now?
One thing is releasing more or less functional apps of the kind you have now in Metro, another is messing with Office " the gold cow" of revenues for MS?
Do not get me,wrong, Office will have the Metro treatment one day but besides the fact of how Metro will evolve by then I do not think that it will happen soon.

Fritzly said,

I strongly doubt.. Besides what kind of Oulook, as well as other Office programs, will be released in Metro? Full fledged or "children of a lesser God" as it is One Note/Metro now?
One thing is releasing more or less functional apps of the kind you have now in Metro, another is messing with Office " the gold cow" of revenues for MS?
Do not get me,wrong, Office will have the Metro treatment one day but besides the fact of how Metro will evolve by then I do not think that it will happen soon.

The Office on Modern is a rather interesting project to follow.

Metro and WinRT are well designed frameworks, but it is more complex software like Office that is fundamentally possible in these frameworks and actually implementing them that will beneficial to the WinRT framework.

When Office hits a road block over a deprecated Win32 API that WinRt doesn't expose, it will force the framework team to reconsider the need of the APIs and give WinRT a new sweep before Windows 9 comes to pass. (And there are several APIs that are still debated inside Microsoft.)

Basically, the development of Office will be the crowbar and hammer to open up WinRT and smooth out any catches that the platform currently has.

With Microsoft it is often the side groups that bring up conundrums for the main Windows team and even help develop the new technologies going forward.

Microsoft cannot afford to dump the majority of existing functionality from Office; however, there are things that are no longer needed and the few companies that uses them could stick with the desktop variations.

If I was a betting person, I think Microsoft will recreate the base engines for Office, that allows the Modern UI to tap into the main engine and still maintain a desktop version that may offer less restrictions on scripting/Apps/etc.

Basically think IE10, and that is what Office should be in the future. 99% of the functionality and all the engine's power in the Modern UI, and additional addon and traditional functionality in the desktop version.

thenetavenger said,

The Office on Modern is a rather interesting project to follow.

Metro and WinRT are well designed frameworks, but it is more complex software like Office that is fundamentally possible in these frameworks and actually implementing them that will beneficial to the WinRT framework.

When Office hits a road block over a deprecated Win32 API that WinRt doesn't expose, it will force the framework team to reconsider the need of the APIs and give WinRT a new sweep before Windows 9 comes to pass. (And there are several APIs that are still debated inside Microsoft.)

Basically, the development of Office will be the crowbar and hammer to open up WinRT and smooth out any catches that the platform currently has.

With Microsoft it is often the side groups that bring up conundrums for the main Windows team and even help develop the new technologies going forward.

Microsoft cannot afford to dump the majority of existing functionality from Office; however, there are things that are no longer needed and the few companies that uses them could stick with the desktop variations.

If I was a betting person, I think Microsoft will recreate the base engines for Office, that allows the Modern UI to tap into the main engine and still maintain a desktop version that may offer less restrictions on scripting/Apps/etc.

Basically think IE10, and that is what Office should be in the future. 99% of the functionality and all the engine's power in the Modern UI, and additional addon and traditional functionality in the desktop version.

Yes this certainly possible but if MS wants to move to Metro, of course in a more mature and refined state that now, I might foresee a time when the desktop as it is understood today will become redundant.
Clearly a version of Office Metro as it is One Note/ Metro today would not be a feasible solution.
It will be indeed interesting to see how things will evolve now that Sinofsky is finally gone.

Aaron44126 said,
I read it as:
"We will ship a full Windows 8 modern version of office ... today"

That would be pretty awesome...more awesome than 'someday' certainly...

I just realized though, why I misread the headline...I saw it in the forum spy first:
"Microsoft: We will ship a full Windows 8 'Modern' version of Offi"
which my brain interpreted at first sight to mean that the 'Modern' part would be turned off in that version...