Netbook OS Jolicloud hits 1.0 milestone

Jolicloud, the free netbook OS that strives to keep users always connected, has hit the 1.0 release milestone. An all new HTML 5-based front-end is the biggest touted feature. In a blog post describing the latest release, Jolicloud said, "Imagine an operating system centered around interacting with your friends. Imagine never having to worry about updates and software installs. Imagine that all your machines are automatically synchronized with one another. Imagine having your Internet ecosystem natively integrated to your machine, with all the coolest apps at your fingertips."

Utilizing cloud-based syncing, among the new stand-out features is the App Directory, a curated application library that is manageable from any HTML 5 capable device. From here, apps can be organized and installed, and deleted, with all changes automatically pushed to all Jolicloud devices on the same account. App updates are also automatically pushed-out so there is no need to manually update. Jolicloud focuses on cloud-based computing, but apps may also utilize local storage. Noteable apps include: Firefox, Facebook, Twitter, Spotify, Boxee, Hulu and more. Networking is also a focus with the Social Stream hub providing integration with Facebook, Twitter, Google Reader and more.

The real draw of Jolicloud is its fresh and streamlined interface. It is compatible with most netbooks, can be installed directly from Windows, and is a free download. This may be just the thing to make the aging netbook segment exciting again.

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@PGHammer: ok i'll try it thanks, btw its not possible to install it on a desktop without using the virtual method?

Viriix said,
@PGHammer: ok i'll try it thanks, btw its not possible to install it on a desktop without using the virtual method?

It's a PC-type ISO, burn it to CD-R/RW or put it on a USB stick. (I mentioned the VM method for using it alongside, as opposed to replacing, your existing OS.)

When I tried it I found it to be a bit too rigid - it's for a little Netbook but these things DO have TV-Out.. The interface should scale.

Viriix said,
aww doesnt work with desktop

Create a VM using your software of choice (VirtualBox or even Windows Virtual PC are great for this) with either 512 MB or 1 GB of RAM, 128 MB of video RAM [VBox] and an 8 GB VHD and away you go.

Tried it yesterday!!

this works like windows vista on 486(just a comparison) ... cant recognize my processor or something .. always stuck with something ..

otherwise aint suited for power users .. newbies can have fun though !!

mukul said,
Tried it yesterday!!

this works like windows vista on 486(just a comparison) ... cant recognize my processor or something .. always stuck with something ..

otherwise aint suited for power users .. newbies can have fun though !!

Did you even read the supported devices, if it isn't on the list, it's not supported.

neo158 said,

Did you even read the supported devices, if it isn't on the list, it's not supported.

However, Jolicloud works just fine on retread laptops (those older x86 laptops running XP that compete with new netbooks); I keep a VM outfitted in such a fashion, and I have Jolicloud 0.9 on it. So, yes it can work as a *desktop* OS, given that it can act as a direct XP alternative.

What folks are forgetting is that Jolicloud is based on *Ubuntu* (specifically, the Netbook Remix); therefore, it's just at home on retread laptops as on new netbooks (if anything, it may work better on the retread laptop due to UNR's still-largely-x86 kernel); therefore, Jolicloud may be more suitable for refurbed laptops.

Very similar to an iPhone's interface.

IMO a small team can not pierce the OS market. Only large companies (such as Google with their upcoming Chrome OS) can do so.

Anyways, I wish them good luck...

I love it but it might not have that great of a future as people move further and further away from netbooks towards tablets.

amon91 said,
I love it but it might not have that great of a future as people move further and further away from netbooks towards tablets.

And where is that happening? Students who aren't rich enough to do the stereotypical student-action of buying a MBP suddenly see that they get get a small, light, and long lasting netbook that runs Windows for roughly $400. That segment isn't going away any time soon.

LiquidSolstice said,

And where is that happening? Students who aren't rich enough to do the stereotypical student-action of buying a MBP suddenly see that they get get a small, light, and long lasting netbook that runs Windows for roughly $400. That segment isn't going away any time soon.


23.

I can get a HP, ASUS, or Acer notebook (dual core) for $499 that would give me around 6 hours of battery life.... so why buy a netbook again? also note that most netbooks have to be recharged after 2 -3 hours of battery usage.

Looks nice, but I don't think we're still far from having Internet everywhere in order to use cloud computing this continuous unless you're going to just use it at home.

roadwarrior said,
One issue I have with that screenshot: WINE = WINE Is Not an Emulator, so calling it a Windows Emulator is wrong.
+1

roadwarrior said,
One issue I have with that screenshot: WINE = WINE Is Not an Emulator, so calling it a Windows Emulator is wrong.

Not sure what screenshot you're looking at, but I don't see WINE anywhere.

1.0 is not available for download at this time. You download and installl the Pre-Final version, then you get put in a queue for the update over the net. I have had the pre-final on my netbook for quite a while and still have not been selected to update to 1.0.

dreckman said,
1.0 is not available for download at this time. You download and installl the Pre-Final version, then you get put in a queue for the update over the net. I have had the pre-final on my netbook for quite a while and still have not been selected to update to 1.0.

I just noticed that on my download, it's pre-final. Just also canceled my download... Whats the point of announcing it like it's out, and then it's not really out...

xendrome said,

I just noticed that on my download, it's pre-final. Just also canceled my download... Whats the point of announcing it like it's out, and then it's not really out...

agree also, seems whole article was waste until 1.0 is actually out.

Skwerl said,
So it's an supposed to be an even more inconveniently sized version of iPhone than the iPad?

Huh??? How did you get anything even remotely related to Apple / iPhone / iPad out of this?

It's for Netbooks, not Slates...

Skwerl said,
So it's an supposed to be an even more inconveniently sized version of iPhone than the iPad?

Really? You're reaching that far for some anti-Apple posts that you're relating a netbook OS to the iPhone?

Pathetic.

Skwerl said,
So it's an supposed to be an even more inconveniently sized version of iPhone than the iPad?

Yeh I see where your coming from, to be fair, the iPad has been a huge failure, haha...

Owait -.-

http://techcrunch.com/2010/04/...50-million-iphones-to-date/

+That was three months ago
+International sales broaden soon

On topic, it actually looks like a clean, decent netbook OS. I do think that OS's designed for netbooks work better than Windows does, simply because it wasn't created with netbooks in mind. It's also good to see competition.

What I'm getting at is that this has similar <i>limited functionality</i> of an even smaller device, but the device it's intended to be used upon is a lot larger. My post was not an anti-Apple one.

jerryrodz said,
looks good, let's give it a try!

It's good, the only thing is though that the "Apps" are just popular websites that are opened in Chromium, without the menu and navigation bars.

I can't help being amazed by all the OSes scrambling to integrate Facebook so deeply. Netbook OSes with social networking fluttering around (this, Meego, etc), smartphone OSes that take Facebook so seriously you're crippling the experience by NOT using it, etc.

I love tech, but I don't use social networking. Oh well? *turns into an old man*

Joshie said,
I can't help being amazed by all the OSes scrambling to integrate Facebook so deeply. Netbook OSes with social networking fluttering around (this, Meego, etc), smartphone OSes that take Facebook so seriously you're crippling the experience by NOT using it, etc.

I love tech, but I don't use social networking. Oh well? *turns into an old man*

I am with you. I don't have time for social networking, and I really don't care what mundane things my friends and acquaintances are doing on a daily basis. Nor do I want to see pictures of their ugly kids smeared all over my phone and PC.

Skwerl said,
I am with you. I don't have time for social networking, and I really don't care what mundane things my friends and acquaintances are doing on a daily basis. Nor do I want to see pictures of their ugly kids smeared all over my phone and PC.

And I'm with you. Socializing is something you do in real life, not with some applications and typing on a keyboard...sigh

sbdb said,

And I'm with you. Socializing is something you do in real life, not with some applications and typing on a keyboard...sigh

Disagree completely. Facebook is used wrongly most of the time. But it's true use and why it is coming to mobile devices is because it's a very powerful navigation tool to know where all your friends are. Integrating it means their contact information comes with it too.

This is the future of navigation. To know where you want to go, and to get there, using social tools and GPS tools, they are minimizing your efforts and making it simple. You don't need to open Facebook manually, and then copy and paste where they are into a GPS tool, most phones make it as simple as tapping on where they are and instantly opening up a map of that location.

Joshie said,
I can't help being amazed by all the OSes scrambling to integrate Facebook so deeply. Netbook OSes with social networking fluttering around (this, Meego, etc), smartphone OSes that take Facebook so seriously you're crippling the experience by NOT using it, etc.

I love tech, but I don't use social networking. Oh well? *turns into an old man*

It's not your fault that younger generation is a bunch of numb-nuts, incapable of making friends and forming relationships in real life.

Electric Jolt said,

Disagree completely. Facebook is used wrongly most of the time. But it's true use and why it is coming to mobile devices is because it's a very powerful navigation tool to know where all your friends are. Integrating it means their contact information comes with it too.

This is the future of navigation. To know where you want to go, and to get there, using social tools and GPS tools, they are minimizing your efforts and making it simple. You don't need to open Facebook manually, and then copy and paste where they are into a GPS tool, most phones make it as simple as tapping on where they are and instantly opening up a map of that location.


Do I really want to track all my friends?....
If I want to talk to one of my friends I'll just give him a call or message him/her....
What happened to privacy and personal life?....

Euphoria said,

Do I really want to track all my friends?....
If I want to talk to one of my friends I'll just give him a call or message him/her....
What happened to privacy and personal life?....

And that's a big issue. For me, managing an address book/contact list with Google or even Windows Live is a far simpler beast than constructing a Facebook existence. I'm happy with how Android (and soon, too, WP7) integrates that and lets me load a contact's address into navigation if that's what I'm up to.

If some friends and I have plans to go somewhere, we talk about the destination, right? Why do I need Facebook to tell me where they'll be, unless I'm not a part of those plans already and don't intend to let them know I'll be dropping in? I just can't imagine a scenario outside of stalking.

If we get separated at, say, a theme park, how does Facebook help us find each other? Issue a status update that we're in front of some ride? For the entirety of our Facebook friends list to see? Makes worlds more sense just to send out a group text, yeah?

There comes a point where innovation stops making things more efficient and just starts finding new ways for the sake of being different.

Euphoria said,

Do I really want to track all my friends?....
If I want to talk to one of my friends I'll just give him a call or message him/her....
What happened to privacy and personal life?....

Then GTFO! jk Well that still exists, it's just some parts of it won't be soon. You are going to have to accept it or, like I said, GTFO. Successful people in their 20s, 30s, etc, are going to want to have all their friends' information at their disposal so they can get together and party or something. They also want to get to events, and they need to work which means they need to be productive too. All this is where we are heading.

If you don't want to give up those parts of your private and personal life, then you won't be part of it when it advances. And that's the part where you GTFO/grow old/etc.

Joshie said,

And that's a big issue. For me, managing an address book/contact list with Google or even Windows Live is a far simpler beast than constructing a Facebook existence. I'm happy with how Android (and soon, too, WP7) integrates that and lets me load a contact's address into navigation if that's what I'm up to.

If some friends and I have plans to go somewhere, we talk about the destination, right? Why do I need Facebook to tell me where they'll be, unless I'm not a part of those plans already and don't intend to let them know I'll be dropping in? I just can't imagine a scenario outside of stalking.

If we get separated at, say, a theme park, how does Facebook help us find each other? Issue a status update that we're in front of some ride? For the entirety of our Facebook friends list to see? Makes worlds more sense just to send out a group text, yeah?

There comes a point where innovation stops making things more efficient and just starts finding new ways for the sake of being different.

No not at all... Lets enter 2020 for a second. Everybody has a phone and a car, both work together and work without the other. Parking lots will be setup to be managed on the computer, the owner can choose which parking lots are reserved for who, and can set rules to decide which parking space for how long and when. This way, when people come to that store, the car can navigate to the best parking spot.

Now by 2020, FourSquare and the likes will be highly used and work side-by-side Facebook. So using your phone to navigate using Bing or Google to a local restaurant, will provide hundreds of reviews which points out your friends' reviews and provides pin-point directions compared to GPS' iffy directions.

Also, most phones will submit your location to Bing or Google during the day when you come near another phone. So when you decide to search someone up later in the day on Bing or Google, it knows both of you were near each other for 8 minutes and assumes you are looking for that person, so it puts them first in the results with no filtering needed. If you wouldn't search them up later in the day but went on Facebook, your suggestions would include them.

This is just a couple ideas I have for 2020. And yes you are giving up a lot of privacy, but do you want to move forward or keep reinventing everything that's already out there. It's definitely another culture from the future, a way of life many are ready for and many aren't. But if you aren't ready for it, you are going to start getting more frustrated with technology and hate it like an old person and that means you chose to GTFO. So I don't know. Only way one forward.

Uhhh, isn't it a little presumptuous to think that your idea for the future is the only acceptable idea for the future and people who have a problem with it will just have to deal?

Privacy is more important to people than you might realize, and technology is by its nature adaptable to the demands of wherever the money is. If anything, the vision of a future that disregards privacy is very, very young, and separate from most forward-thinking we've seen over the last 20 years.

The internet is a place of fads. It started out as a basic sharing tool, evolved into a research and consumer tool, and from there to an entertainment and social toy. These are all very different directions, and looking at each it would be very difficult to predict what came after. For you to think that the internet is just going to stay the way it is today (just with more information tapped) is actually pretty short-sighted, and disregards technology's enormous talent for going off on wild tangents.

I worry about OS updates at work due to all systems involved, but certainly not in an OS aimed for the demography that Jolicloud is. Sounds like one of those Linux distros that make heavy use of some Mozilla Weave-like feature? Like Peppermint OS etc...