New version of $35 Raspberry Pi PC is released

It's been over three years since the tiny Raspberry Pi computer was first announced, and more than two years since it went on sale. Since then, millions of the devices have been sold, and thousands have been given away too, including some to students, to help inspire a new generation of programmers and developers. 

Today, a new version of the Pi has been launched, with added capabilities and lower power consumption. Known as the Model B+, the Raspberry Pi Foundation describes it as "the final evolution of the original" hardware, and it will be sold at the same price - just $35 USD - as the most recent Model B version. 

The B+ uses the same BCM2835 processor as its predecessor, with the same software and 512MB of RAM. But numerous improvements have been made to keep the device up to date, including two additional USB 2.0 ports (bringing the total to four), a push-in-push-out microSD slot (replacing the former 'friction-fit' full-size SD) and a reduction in power consumption of between 0.5W and 1.0W. 

Additionally, the audio circuit now gets its own integrated low-noise power supply, and the GPIO header is now a 40-pin unit, while still retaining the same pinout for the first 26 pins as the Model B. The layout of the device has also been improved, moving the USB ports right to the edge of the board and relocating composite video to the 3.5mm jack, as well as adding four 'squarely-placed' mounting holes. 

The Foundation anticipates considerable demand for its latest model, which is why it will be keeping the older Model B in production "for industrial customers... for as long as there's demand for it." The Model B+ goes on sale today - check out the video below to find out more about it. 

Source and image: Raspberry Pi Foundation

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I use OpenELEC for mine making it into a cheap media center that uses less power and is more capable than my PS3 :-)

raspbmc vs openelec? openelec is just less cutting edge than xbian. I find openelec better than raspbmc but more stable than xbian.

Bigkaye said,
raspbmc vs openelec? openelec is just less cutting edge than xbian. I find openelec better than raspbmc but more stable than xbian.

Cheers for that, i'll do a bit of reading but it would be good to get others opinions too.

MikeChipshop said,
which one would you recommend?

if you want Linux that runs a media center, raspbmc.
If you want a media center that you infrequently have to bail out into Linux, then OpenELEC is for you,
I found I had to bail into Linux to resize default partitions in openelec, not sure what the new setup is like, because auto-update is on and it just works.
Connect over smb to 12TB of storage of low rest copies of everything I like, so the image and metadata cache on the pi is fairly large.

Have not heard of xbian myself.

I like openelec because I didn't have to wait for the Pi to download and install raspbmc. Not sure if thats still a thing, but I get a 100MB IMG file I write to my SD card and bam I'm in XBMC. It was just much faster downloading via gigabit computer than the Pi doing it. Auto updates work or I can force it by uploading the target files to the SMB share update directory and rebooting via SSH. I found no real stability issues in their gotham builds, just unable to set your SSH password and CEC issues which appear to be a TV problem not a Pi problem. xbian I found incredibly unstable, but had the most cutting edge features. I haven't used raspbmc or xbian for over a year now though.

I like the idea of the more hands off approach of Openelec. I mean, i'm capable of taking a hands on approach but then if it can be hands off, why not eh?

I think i'll smack Openelec on there and give it a go.

The rPi seems to be behind now.. i come across the Banana Pi recently..

$29.99 for:
ARM Cortex-A7 dual-core, 1GHz
Mali400MP2 GPU
1GB DDR3 DRAM
Gigabit Ethernet
HDMI
3.5mm stereo jack output
On-board microphone input
2 x USB 2.0 ports
3 x on-board buttons

Cheaper and much more powerful

goodbytes said,
The rPi seems to be behind now.. i come across the Banana Pi recently..

$29.99 for:
ARM Cortex-A7 dual-core, 1GHz
Mali400MP2 GPU
1GB DDR3 DRAM
Gigabit Ethernet
HDMI
3.5mm stereo jack output
On-board microphone input
2 x USB 2.0 ports
3 x on-board buttons

Cheaper and much more powerful

I bet that could run an snes emulator!

goodbytes said,
The rPi seems to be behind now.. i come across the Banana Pi recently..

$29.99 for:
ARM Cortex-A7 dual-core, 1GHz
Mali400MP2 GPU
1GB DDR3 DRAM
Gigabit Ethernet
HDMI
3.5mm stereo jack output
On-board microphone input
2 x USB 2.0 ports
3 x on-board buttons

Cheaper and much more powerful

Depends a lot on OS support and what GL level the GPU supports. I've seen a lot of superior Pi clones / concepts that end up with a ported version of Raspbian that performs worse than the Pi in a lot of cases.

Aergan said,

Depends a lot on OS support and what GL level the GPU supports. I've seen a lot of superior Pi clones / concepts that end up with a ported version of Raspbian that performs worse than the Pi in a lot of cases.


Exactly this. The Pi's hardware accelerated but sucks because of the lack of drivers, and it's got a huge bunch of developers hacking together to make one, but atm it's pretty much garbage.
What chance does another product have with much less in terms of developer size? Zero.

'The B+ uses the same BCM2835 processor as its predecessor' - which unfortunately is pretty weak (even SNES emulators fail to run on it [100%] smoothly), but cheap and good for education (its primary market) and a media center (raspBMC surprisingly plays 720p/1080p content smoothly, thanks to hardware decoding). A great tool to teach game programming through Python also, and as the basis for a robot with basic computer vision - in another words: so much capability for the price.

Noticed that the RAM is soldered on top of the CPU?

Edited by 68k, Jul 14 2014, 12:18pm :

Always wanted to get on for playing, but I don't have an external display with me at all. Every system at home is now a laptop. Oh well, maybe in the future.

elenarie said,
Always wanted to get on for playing, but I don't have an external display with me at all. Every system at home is now a laptop. Oh well, maybe in the future.

I never hooked mine up to a display, keyboard or mouse. Power and ethernet, that's it. You can do all the cool stuff remotely!

It's intended to be as low cost as possible, why would they integrate something a lot of people don't need increasing the cost for everyone? Plug a tiny $6-8 wireless adapter into one of the 4 USB ports, done!

-adrian- said,
No Wifi :(

You can't have it all for $35. :-) But it has two additional USB 2.0 ports where you can plug in your wifi-dongle.

-adrian- said,
because wifi would be an essential part of a small portable pc, wouldn't it :o

They're not designed to be small portable PCs. They were intended as learning tools for schoolkids, but the Hacker community has a lot of interest in them too :)

Majesticmerc said,

They're not designed to be small portable PCs. They were intended as learning tools for schoolkids, but the Hacker community has a lot of interest in them too :)

I get that but its totally worthless to me until it can run Windows. Once they get that to happen I might consider buying one.

Gotenks98 said,
I get that but its totally worthless to me until it can run Windows. Once they get that to happen I might consider buying one.

You will be waiting a long, long time.

Gotenks98 said,
I get that but its totally worthless to me until it can run Windows. Once they get that to happen I might consider buying one.

If you need it to run Windows, it's not aimed at you. It's a low level hobby device in the same vein as an Arduino or a simple breadboard. It's not an all-purpose PC.

Gotenks98 said,
.... Windows.....

I am a big windows fan as well, but I have the Model B stuck to the back of my TV with some silly putty running XBMC media center for my bedroom TV.

It's a perfect solution once you install codec packs (sold seperately).

Gotenks98 said,
I get that but its totally worthless to me until it can run Windows. Once they get that to happen I might consider buying one.

Right now the only Windows on ARM we have in Windows RT, and that would be awful for this device due to the signing restriction on anything except windows store executable files. I'd love for Microsoft to release a more open version of Windows on ARM that could be installed on whatever ARM device you want.