Nursingjobs.us would rather give clients a new PC than support IE7

Microsoft is now on the 11th version of its Internet Explorer browser, but there are still a number of people who are still using older versions of IE to surf the Internet. That includes IE7, which was first released in 2006.

Many websites, such as Twitter, have already ended support for IE7, and now there's word that one such site is offering to help its customers who are still using the older browser graduate to a newer version in an unusual way. Nursingjobs.us, a Seattle-based company that helps hospitals and other medical facilities hire nurses, recently launched a new site design that's been made to take advantage of the features supported in more modern web browsers, along with better mobile and tablet support.

In a blog post, the company stated that IE7 users still make up 1.22 percent of their overall traffic and while it knows that percentage will continue to decline, it also says some of its users are stuck with Microsoft's older browser. So to get around this issue, they came up with an idea that they though at first was crazy "but now makes a lot of sense"

Simply put, IE7 users of Nursingjobs.us are eligible to get a brand new PC with a more advanced web browser. The blog states, "We determined that it would cost us more to support a browser from 2006 in 2014 and beyond than it would to help our clients upgrade their legacy hardware."  They added, "We want to make sure all our customers are well served by our new product and we are serious about making this right if our ceasing to support IE7 becomes an inconvenience."

While other browsers such as Google's Chrome and Mozilla's Firefox have been set up to automatically update to new versions every few weeks, Microsoft has not offered that same kind of support for IE across the board. As a result, IE8, which was first released in 2009, remains the world's most used web browser, according to Net Applications.

Source: Nursingjobs.us| Image via Nursingjobs.us | Thanks for the tip Ray

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35 Comments

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Still working with IE 6. Supporting IE 7 would be paradise to many web developers!

Hospitals still use IE 6 and are just transitioning to IE 7!?

Why cut them off?? FYI it is illegal to run newer browsers as the apps aren't FDA certified. Whole equipment like MRI scanners only support it and its expensive to replace. Certification can take up to 5 years.

So the job applicants use newer browsers but the hospitals that hire won't upgrade.

For IE12, my wishlist... Remove IE5, IE7 and IE8 emulation mode since Windows XP is no longer supported and they need to die and it will also make some dead code cleanup from IE resulting in some less annoyances and reduce maintenance cost.

Zlip792 said,
For IE12, my wishlist... Remove IE5, IE7 and IE8 emulation mode since Windows XP is no longer supported and they need to die and it will also make some dead code cleanup from IE resulting in some less annoyances and reduce maintenance cost.

LOL then expect IE 8 to double in length for corporate clients for decades to come. The reason IE 6 is still around is because of mission critical apps. Take compatibility away like what happened with IE 7 and users freak out and assume the old one is inferior and lock down their pcs from being upgraded.

we just ditched support for IE7 on our sites... it was a big improvement over 6, but still had some annoying CSS bugs

neufuse said,
we just ditched support for IE7 on our sites... it was a big improvement over 6, but still had some annoying CSS bugs

Now you just need to get on with stopping support for 8 and 9 as well

TheExperiment said,

Now you just need to get on with stopping support for 8 and 9 as well

when 30% of our clients use IE8 still, 25% use IE9 and a whole 10% use Chrome with the rest being IE10 and IE11 we can't... IE7 we only had 5% usage and it was too buggy so we said that's it, we no longer support it.. upgrade your browser if you want to use our services

TheExperiment said,

Now you just need to get on with stopping support for 8 and 9 as well

Given their share of the market, that'll be a while.

ExplodingKnees said,

Given their share of the market, that'll be a while.


I was half joking. I appreciate what Google is doing with cutting support for the old stuff, as that's the only way to convince anyone to actually upgrade in the first place. But obviously it's a hard sell.

So, if they are supporting IE8, what's wrong with just upgrading to IE8 instead of getting a new PC, or upgrade the OS? I mean, no Windows edition stops IE support at IE7.

Studio384 said,
So, if they are supporting IE8, what's wrong with just upgrading to IE8 instead of getting a new PC, or upgrade the OS? I mean, no Windows edition stops IE support at IE7.

However, IE8 is still bad, and is the default browser of Windows 7.

Brony said,

However, IE8 is still bad, and is the default browser of Windows 7.

From a web design perspective, 8 is pretty decent. Most common things you code/design should work pretty well on 8 without any changes. Some cosmetic stuff like border-radius won't but then it just appears as a squared edge. No biggy.

7 was a lot more tricky and needed more effort. Where I work we no longer accommodate IE7 by default. If you want it supported it'll need included in the project specification and the cost will be adjusted accordingly.

ExplodingKnees said,

From a web design perspective, 8 is pretty decent. Most common things you code/design should work pretty well on 8 without any changes. Some cosmetic stuff like border-radius won't but then it just appears as a squared edge. No biggy.
A few things simply don't work on IE8... For example .getElementsByClassName(). But to be honest, those are pretty easy problems to get around.

"While other browsers such as Google's Chrome and Mozilla's Firefox have been set up to automatically update to new versions every few weeks, Microsoft has not offered that same kind of support for IE across the board."

Why?

Sas Center said,
"While other browsers such as Google's Chrome and Mozilla's Firefox have been set up to automatically update to new versions every few weeks, Microsoft has not offered that same kind of support for IE across the board."

Why?

To put it simly: because browsers shouldn't update every single day. Anyway: IE updates are forced these days, unless you block the update in Windows Update. There is a good reason why IE10 lost so much market share last month while IE11 jumped 10%. We've never seen this with IE before, and is only explained by the fact that IE is auto-updated on Windows 7 (Windows 8 users have to upgrade to 8.1).

Studio384 said,
To put it simly: because browsers shouldn't update every single day. Anyway: IE updates are forced these days, unless you block the update in Windows Update. There is a good reason why IE10 lost so much market share last month while IE11 jumped 10%. We've never seen this with IE before, and is only explained by the fact that IE is auto-updated on Windows 7 (Windows 8 users have to upgrade to 8.1).

<snipped>
Internet Explorer was left behind several times in features and capabilities, for example Iexplorer was the last one to adopt the use of tabs. Right now, Internet Explorer still miss some features that other browser already adopted years ago.

Edited by Eric, Jan 30 2014, 3:04pm :

haha tabs is not the best argument to use.

Microsoft considered the task bar to be there to act as 'tabs'. It had tabs, just not at the top but at the bottom. It is also from a time when most people had 1...maybe 2 programs open at once. Now most people have 5+ programs running here and there.

Brony said,
Internet Explorer was left behind several times in features and capabilities, for example Iexplorer was the last one to adopt the use of tabs.

Out of the box yes, but it was actually (I think) the first to have tabs via a third party addon, predates the others by a couple years. (Not that I'm a fan of IE.. only time I really used it was for XP's updates back in the day.)

Studio384 said,
To put it simly: because browsers shouldn't update every single day. .

Sorry but the html rendering engine, the js engine and the security of a browser should be updated as often as needed. Only the ui doesn't really need to be updated.

Studio384 said,
To put it simly: because browsers shouldn't update every single day. Anyway: IE updates are forced these days, unless you block the update in Windows Update. There is a good reason why IE10 lost so much market share last month while IE11 jumped 10%. We've never seen this with IE before, and is only explained by the fact that IE is auto-updated on Windows 7 (Windows 8 users have to upgrade to 8.1).

I hate IE. But you have a point: a real, reliable browser, should never update itself ever day!
It WILL break compatibility with banks, some specific sites, addons and so on. And when it is finally fixed... another update.
This will never be acceptable on most enterprises, and even small offices.

Sas Center said,
"While other browsers such as Google's Chrome and Mozilla's Firefox have been set up to automatically update to new versions every few weeks, Microsoft has not offered that same kind of support for IE across the board."

Why?

They finally have it with IE11, but the main reason is because IE is the primary browser for enterprises. You can't have your browser automatically install updates when businesses rely on them. New versions can break functionality and that's not good. With each new version of a browser each business goes through rigorous testing before they allow their employees to use it.

LaP said,

Sorry but the html rendering engine, the js engine and the security of a browser should be updated as often as needed. Only the ui doesn't really need to be updated.

Google creates with every update more glitches, bugs, and security holes than they fix. Their own engineers have admitted this.

Microsoft takes its time to test and validate every update for compatibility. And even rolls back updtes that don't work. Google just releases a new patch for as many flaws as they have to fix for most people to stop complaining.

Firefox can't even get a testing rig set up for 64-bit computing... somehow.

aristofeles said,

I hate IE. But you have a point: a real, reliable browser, should never update itself ever day!
It WILL break compatibility with banks, some specific sites, addons and so on. And when it is finally fixed... another update.
This will never be acceptable on most enterprises, and even small offices.

They just have to make and/or use or ask for standard compliant web sites and they wont have any problem with modern web browsers (it might not be pixel perfect on all of them but it's gonna work). The web standards are updated rarely. It takes many many years for a new standard to be recommended.

The reason why there's (was) a problem is because IE went un-updated (many rendering bugs were not patched) for way too long and people were coding web site specifically for it to bypass those rendering bugs. This is the thing that is unacceptable as a lot of money was lost making web sites ie6 compatible for those enterprises.

A rendering engine (html, css, js) needs to be patched asap when rendering bugs are found or new standards are recommended (they are every 10-15 years ...). Security needs to be updated asap when a security hole is found. Only the UI can wait and stay the same.

Edited by LaP, Jan 29 2014, 8:24pm :

LaP said,

They just have to make and/or use or ask for standard compliant web sites and they wont have any problem with modern web browsers (it might not be pixel perfect on all of them but it's gonna work). The web standards are updated rarely. It takes many many years for a new standard to be recommended.

Enterprise websites DO need to be pixel perfect and work exactly as intended. Otherwise the business risks losing lots of money. Web sites and applications that do not work as intended is not tolerated.

mnl1121 said,

Enterprise websites DO need to be pixel perfect and work exactly as intended. Otherwise the business risks losing lots of money. Web sites and applications that do not work as intended is not tolerated.

And browsers MUST be updated when rendering bugs are found and new standards come out. There's no other way around.

Saying a company should not patch asap the rendering bugs in their browser because it will break the poorly coded web sites of some badly managed companies is extremely stupid as far as i'm concerned (and i know many of my fellow web designers agree with that).

It is not that simple.

When Firefox 5 came out it angered many and forced webmasters to downgrade to only offering IE 8 support. Why?

Webmasters MUST certify in writing that their app is pixel perfect and won't have any bugs and that they are liable and will PAY out of pocket any browser issues! Standard legal contract.

It is your ass on the line if the W3C changes box models, pixel interpretation, and who knows what else. DO you really want to risk Firefox 34 or IE 18 break it and have your customer lawyers send an invoice for $800,000?

Refuse that kind of deal and lose to your competitors. If Firefox stayed with 2 year release cycles then it can be tested and certified too so you force customers to use old versions.

Witness modern IE? No one outside grandma is using it. Things break so IT departments deploy a patch to live in the past and the older browser lives longer.

If I were the head of IT for Nursingjobs.com I'd save them even more money, but ending support for IE7 as well as not doing this stupid program. No one is stuck with IE7. Even 10 year old hardware can upgrade to the newest IE. Even if they can't due to having an old OS, they can upgrade as high as IE9 I believe. There is also the choice of moving to Firefox or Chrome. I find it hard to believe that spending more money for such a small percentage is worth it. Let them fend for themselves. There are plenty of alternatives.

techbeck said,
IE8 is the newest version that can be installed on WinXP. And using/installing multiple browsers can be a headache for support.

technically ie6 is supported as long as XP is. Strange to think that a browser that worked on 98 is still supported

techbeck said,
IE8 is the newest version that can be installed on WinXP. And using/installing multiple browsers can be a headache for support.

Those users shouldn't be using their OS on the Internet in a few months, so they don't matter.

That's nice of them, though now that it has made the news they'll probably have to stop because everyone will start trying to take advantage of them to get new PCs for free.