Pioneer BDR-2207: 128 Gigabytes on a single Blu-ray disk

Pioneer is about to market BDR-2207, the company’s new, powerful optical disks burner that supports the latest Blu-ray class format known as BDXL. Thanks to the BDXL specifications, the new burner can write (and obviously read) hundreds of Gigabytes of data on a single 12-cm Blu-ray disk.

Defined in June 2010, BDXL includes triple and quad-layer BD-R (write once) disks holding 100 and 128 Gigabytes of data respectively. BDR-2207 is among the first (if not the first) BD writers to support disks with such gargantuan storage volume, while of course reading and writing all the other optical and laser-based media formats.

The new Pioneer burner – the company’s “most powerful and full featured drive” – is a Serial-ATA device that reads and writes Blu-ray disks (BD-R and BD-RE) up to 6x (12x for single and double-layer Blu-rays), DVD disks (-R,+R,-RW,-RAM) up to 12x, CD-R and CD-RW disks up to 40/24x. The drive’s cache amounts to 4 Megabytes.

BDXL support aside, BDR-2207 also includes features to increase performance and security of data retrieving from burned and original disks: the drive is 42% faster to get a disk ready for the OS after insertion, Pioneer states, offers a “smoother” movie playback (DVD or Blu-ray) in case of “scratches, fingerprints and other abnormalities” that could render parts of the disk unreadable (PowerRead), automatically adjusts its reading speed for silent movie watching or super-fast backup burning (Auto Quiet mode), algorithmically extracts original data from difficult-to-read CD-audio disks “as accurately as possible” (PureRead).

Set to be released this month for a suggested retail price of 99,99 US dollars, the BDR-2207 package also includes programs made by software company Cyberlink to watch 2D and 3D movies (PowerDVD 10 BD3D), edit or author user-made video clips (PowerDirector 9) and backup personal files (Power2Go 7).

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Can current Blu-Ray players read these disks? Can current Blu-Ray PC burners' firmware be upgraded to burn/read these disks?

Questions and questions.....

Did I honestly read right, 120GB burner for $99.99? Because that does seem pretty cheap. How much will the discs be though?

It's cheaper than equivalent capacity Flash memory. Excellent for archiving/backing up data which doesn't need to be regularly refreshed.

xpclient said,
It's cheaper than equivalent capacity Flash memory. Excellent for archiving/backing up data which doesn't need to be regularly refreshed.

Yup. This is great for having another backup than the hard drive.
Rule #1: Do not have backups in one place.

Jose_49 said,

Yup. This is great for having another backup than the hard drive.
Rule #1: Do not have backups in one place.

I have my stuff on all sorts of formats. My most important irreplaceable stuff is on MO (magneto-optical) and DVD-RAM (Type 1 cartridges) in addition to my external hard drive (and a few things online). I had an old tape drive but it finally died and I never replaced it.

xpclient said,
It's cheaper than equivalent capacity Flash memory. Excellent for archiving/backing up data which doesn't need to be regularly refreshed.

'Refreshing' Flash Memory increases the chance of errors when used as an archive medium.

It is the actual 'reading' of Flash memory that can cause adjacent errors. So if you are refreshing flash RAM, you are risking data corruption each time you do this.

Even with good block technology and error correction, it is best to leave it alone...

They need to slash the prices of the blank discs, 100 for £30 sounds about right.
Only then can it compete with HDD storage. Although I still yearly take a backup of music and documents on to DVDs.
Pictures however will never be burnt on to a DVD as I have well over 60GB of those (raw files and all that).

^^
From what I recall and my experience, it is much harder to scratch Blu-Ray discs. I believe they add an additional coating to protect them. I know my kids are especially hard on discs and we have gone through many DVDs.. However, with the blu-rays they are still scratch free.

As for the comments about data backups and a storage medium.. MHO Tape/Optical storage will always stay around as form or means of backup. Maybe not for home use but def. in a corporate environment. I personally couldn't fathom entrusting my entire company on nothing more but RAID based drives locally stored.. IDK maybe I'm getting old skool lol

SaltLife said,
^^
From what I recall and my experience, it is much harder to scratch Blu-Ray discs. I believe they add an additional coating to protect them. I know my kids are especially hard on discs and we have gone through many DVDs.. However, with the blu-rays they are still scratch free.

As for the comments about data backups and a storage medium.. MHO Tape/Optical storage will always stay around as form or means of backup. Maybe not for home use but def. in a corporate environment. I personally couldn't fathom entrusting my entire company on nothing more but RAID based drives locally stored.. IDK maybe I'm getting old skool lol

I work in a library and we get a ton of scratched blu-ray discs in. I do not know what they do to scratch them upl like they do.

Panda X said,
Sounds neat and all, but I can't see optical discs lasting for too much longer.

Explain how companies who use document imaging, cold storage, watermarking etc etc would be able to do this without optical media? AFAIK, companies who comply with PCI-DSS require this technology don't they? at least that's how it was a few years ago when I worked for a company dealing with financial transactions.

McKay said,
128GB Disks for Consoles, yes please

I don't think consoles will need that much space until we start seeing Ultra Definition technology.

Kushan said,

I don't think consoles will need that much space until we start seeing Ultra Definition technology.

We'll see it sooner than later. My prediction: PS4 will be out in 2013-14 with 4K resolution support and a qual-layer Blu-ray drive (you know, all those FMV clips in ultra-crisp definition takes many bits of space :-P)...

The thing is, that we could see the need of more space if we use uncompressed video. Several terabytes would be used if we watched uncompressed video.

McKay said,
128GB Disks for Consoles, yes please

256gb SD to 1tb SD cards would be a better option.

As flash RAM prices continue to drop and manufacturing puts them in the 'disposable' range, there is no reason that anyone should seriously consider a 'locked' size medium like optical inherently is.

Why not use flash and start today with 32gb and 64gb of space for a console game (more than BluRay already) and let it be able to expand up to multiple TBs in size?

The King of GnG said,
Optical disks are out a storage media? Not for me, in my lifetime this won't happen. Because...

http://millenniata.com/


I'll be honest, from a chemistry and physics point of view, that sounds like total ****. It WILL degrade, just because it takes a long time does not mean that it will NOT degrade.

n_K said,

I'll be honest, from a chemistry and physics point of view, that sounds like total ****. It WILL degrade, just because it takes a long time does not mean that it will NOT degrade.

Probably not in your lifetime which is all that matters. The real problem with them is that they only hold 4.7GB which is a pitiful amount these days. Still ok for archiving family photos, documents, etc.

TRC said,

Probably not in your lifetime which is all that matters. The real problem with them is that they only hold 4.7GB which is a pitiful amount these days. Still ok for archiving family photos, documents, etc.

Just get two or three hard drives and put them in a RAID. The chances of losing them all at once is miniscule.

mrp04 said,

Just get two or three hard drives and put them in a RAID. The chances of losing them all at once is miniscule.

Not good price for that.

n_K said,

I'll be honest, from a chemistry and physics point of view, that sounds like total ****. It WILL degrade, just because it takes a long time does not mean that it will NOT degrade.

It's dumbed down, and of course there is marketing in there, but reading between all that the science seems plausible. They say that it will degrade, the weakest part of it is the polycarbonate, which makes sense when there is no dye involved; physical changes in many materials will be much more resistant to degradation than dyes.

I would be interested to know what material is used for the data layer.

With HDD prices more or less nose diving, I stopped burning data to disc long ago. More storage for optical is nice, for those who use it still, but honestly I don't see it lasting long as a storage/backup medium now. Unless they come out with some really really cheap disc that can hold 1TB+ then maybe it's still got life.

I think HDDs and SSDs will hold out and even movies will, at some point, switch over to being sold on some form of solid state media, it's easier to lock a flash drive as far as copy protection goes compared to a optical disc I think.

GP007 said,
With HDD prices more or less nose diving, I stopped burning data to disc long ago. More storage for optical is nice, for those who use it still, but honestly I don't see it lasting long as a storage/backup medium now. Unless they come out with some really really cheap disc that can hold 1TB+ then maybe it's still got life.

I think HDDs and SSDs will hold out and even movies will, at some point, switch over to being sold on some form of solid state media, it's easier to lock a flash drive as far as copy protection goes compared to a optical disc I think.

It's still faster, cheaper, and more reliable TI send a disc through the mail than a mechanical hard drive.

GP007 said,
With HDD prices more or less nose diving, I stopped burning data to disc long ago. More storage for optical is nice, for those who use it still, but honestly I don't see it lasting long as a storage/backup medium now. Unless they come out with some really really cheap disc that can hold 1TB+ then maybe it's still got life.

I think HDDs and SSDs will hold out and even movies will, at some point, switch over to being sold on some form of solid state media, it's easier to lock a flash drive as far as copy protection goes compared to a optical disc I think.

for a while i think when 2TB hard drives where around $80 it was actually giving you more storage for your money vs burning DVD's and the convenience/speed of a hard drive.

but i imagine once bluray burners and especially the disc become fairly cheap to burn it will probably regain the storage to cost ratio again over hard drives.

also, after those floods in Thailand hard drive prices skyrocketed and they still have not fully recovered yet based on where hard drives are currently priced but they are coming back down in price as they litterally at one point went up about 2.5times the price vs what it previously was (i.e. $80 vs 200) for the exact same 2TB hard drive.

plus i still prefer, at least for higher priority important data, to have one copy on a quality recordable disc (i.e. TY or Verbatim) as hard drives, while fast/convenient, i don't trust as much as DVD recordable media as those you can depend on, assuming you don't scratch/abuse the disc, to reliable retrieve your data where as a hard drive can fail quickly at times.

so point is... i think hard drives and recordable media have their ups and downs as speed/convenience hard drive are obviously better but i would give the reliability to recordable media because look at it this way... a properly burned/quality recordable DVD-R (o +R) will most likely last AT LEAST 5 years and probably more towards 10+ years where as your average hard drive i think it's safe to say has a higher failure rate in that same time frame assuming you don't abuse the disc with scratches etc.

dagamer34 said,

It's still faster, cheaper, and more reliable TI send a disc through the mail than a mechanical hard drive.

Sure, but that's kinda a niche thing and besides, most discs I get via mail and so on are promotions and come on old DVDs. Sure someone could need to send 50GB or more to someone else but again, we're not talking the majority of people here.

dagamer34 said,

It's still faster, cheaper, and more reliable TI send a disc through the mail than a mechanical hard drive.

We don't have bandwith caps here so i say it's easier just to share the uncopyrighted file, by any of the hundred of of means online.

GP007 said,
With HDD prices more or less nose diving, I stopped burning data to disc long ago. More storage for optical is nice, for those who use it still, but honestly I don't see it lasting long as a storage/backup medium now. Unless they come out with some really really cheap disc that can hold 1TB+ then maybe it's still got life.

I think HDDs and SSDs will hold out and even movies will, at some point, switch over to being sold on some form of solid state media, it's easier to lock a flash drive as far as copy protection goes compared to a optical disc I think.

After the floods the HDDs prices rise so much its impossible to buy. I will be backing up rarely used data to BDs for long time.

GP007 said,
With HDD prices more or less nose diving, I stopped burning data to disc long ago. More storage for optical is nice, for those who use it still, but honestly I don't see it lasting long as a storage/backup medium now. Unless they come out with some really really cheap disc that can hold 1TB+ then maybe it's still got life.

I think HDDs and SSDs will hold out and even movies will, at some point, switch over to being sold on some form of solid state media, it's easier to lock a flash drive as far as copy protection goes compared to a optical disc I think.

I've largely not burned data to disc as well. While DVD-Rs are still reasonably affordable compared to HDD prices, that's not the case with any discs of larger capacity than that. Ack. A BD-XL disc actually costs more per GB than a DVD-R or a regular BD-R disc. Provided you can even find a BD-XL disc on sale in the first place (hard to find, those stuff).

Kai Y said,

I've largely not burned data to disc as well. While DVD-Rs are still reasonably affordable compared to HDD prices, that's not the case with any discs of larger capacity than that. Ack. A BD-XL disc actually costs more per GB than a DVD-R or a regular BD-R disc. Provided you can even find a BD-XL disc on sale in the first place (hard to find, those stuff).

I wonder if they'll ever be affordable. Double layer DVD-R is still outrageous and it has been out for an eternity. No one uses them so the price never came down. Single layer BD-R is just now becoming reasonable, dual layer is still out of the question. Quad layer, I don't even want to imagine.

dagamer34 said,

It's still faster, cheaper, and more reliable TI send a disc through the mail than a mechanical hard drive.

What? What does Texas Instruments have to do with this article?