Sites, including UPS.com, hacked by TurkGuvenligi

Numerous people noticed that the UPS website was defaced this afternoon. While groups like LulzSec and Anonymous have been receiving most of the publicity recently, there are still other people out there looking to attack sites and today a group calling themselves TurkGuvenligi (translated to Turkish Security, although Softpedia reports that it translates to Turkish Trust League) is responsible for the defacement. The group appears to be Turkish, based on the flag on their Twitter feed. In addition, Google Translate indicates that their tweets are in Turkish.

The group placed a splash page that proudly stated “hacking is not a crime.” In addition the group has declared today as “World Hackers Day.” Not only was the UPS website attacked, but according to zone-h, Vodafone.com, theregister.co.uk, acer.com, betfair.com, nationalgeographic.com, and telegraph.co.uk were also attacked. Since all of these companies use NetNames as their registrar, it’s suspected that the group didn’t attack the companies’ actual servers but instead modified DNS records to point the sites to the splash page.

Last month, Softpedia reported that the group defaced HSBC’s Korean website. It doesn’t appear that any data has been taken from any of these attacks but the group does appear to be ramping up it’s attacks recently.

Based on G4TV forum posts, the UPS site appears to have been down for roughly thirty minutes, although actual times would depend on how long each individual DNS server had the bad information cached.

Thanks to TheDisneyMagic for initially pointing this out!

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16 Comments

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I am still not able to access UPS from my UK connection but when I VPN and use my US connection I can view the page.

No longer getting the hacked page, just connection timing out.

And "Gel Babana" means "Come to Papa" actually. "Güvenliği" means "Security". So "TurkGuvenliği" means "Turkish Security".

I'm Turkish btw.

They have to hack sites for a cause. I do not approve this act. There is no reason to hack those sites. And they didn't really hack the servers. Only DNS records. It is simply childish.

I'm Turkish too btw.

. . . . . a group calling themselves TurkGuvenligi (translated to Turkish Trust League) is responsible for the defacement. The group appears to be Turkish, based on the flag on their Twitter feed. In addition, Google Translate indicates that their tweets are in Turkish.

That's some great detective work, Sherlock.

M_Lyons10 said,
Why on earth would anyone hack National Geographic??

These "public" hackers these days seem to do it "for the lols" and don't really have any rhyme or reason for their childish games. At least attack companies people hate...

M_Lyons10 said,
Why on earth would anyone hack National Geographic??
You should have instead asked, why wouldn't anyone want to hack National Geographic on World Hackers Day?

What the ****? I have a pending shipment from ups, and am not able to track it!!! Damn, i want to kill those stupid *******. ****ing hackers.

kavi14 said,
What the ****? I have a pending shipment from ups, and am not able to track it!!! Damn, i want to kill those stupid *******. ****ing hackers.

Grow up.

I heard also e-commerce sites were not able to print UPS labels and estimate shipping cost for customers. This could cost them a lot.

Non-Active-Account said,
I heard also e-commerce sites were not able to print UPS labels and estimate shipping cost for customers. This could cost them a lot.

Thats not actually unusual for UPS. nearly every place Ive worked had had that problem with UPS in the mail room, but not FedEx.

warwagon said,
Wonderful. Not sure how reassuring it is to see a company as big as UPS get defaced.

From the article, it isn't believe that UPS or any of the other websites were hacked:

"it's suspected that the group didn't attack the companies' actual servers but instead modified DNS records"