Study shows IE10 to have better privacy protection than rivals

Microsoft has generated a lot of hype, and also a lot of controversy, over its decision to make Do Not Track as the default setting in Internet Explorer 10. Microsoft also says that the preview version of IE11 has some improvements for this feature. Now a new study of the major web browsers (IE10, Chrome, Firefox and Safari) shows that IE10 has the best privacy protection overall, but that the Do Not Track feature is mostly just a PR bullet point and not effective, at least not yet.

The study, posted this week by NSS Labs, stated that IE10 is the only one of the four browsers that allows users to select from one or more tracking protection lists. All four browsers prompt the user if a website attempts to retrieve their location. In terms of third party cookies, Firefox and Chrome allow them but Safari blocks all third party cookies by default. As far as IE10, NSS Labs states:

IE is not set to block all third-­party cookies by default; however, those third-­party cookies that do not have a compact privacy policy, or that save information that can be used to contact the user without explicit consent, are blocked by default. IE also restricts first-­party cookies that save information that can be used to contact the user without their implicit consent.

The Do Not Track feature in IE10 is not enabled by default in any of the other three browsers, and in some cases finding how to enable it in Safari and Chrome is difficult. However, the study says that even though IE10 has Do Not Track enabled, it doesn't mean much other than Microsoft making a statement on customer privacy in general. The study states that "if proposed legislation prevails and requires honest compliance" then people who use IE10 will have their privacy better protected than users of Chrome, Firefox and Safari.

Source: NSS Labs | Image via NSS Labs

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22 Comments

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IE 11 is going to be my next default browser. if only MS comes up with bookmark sync option it would be perfect. better plugin support like firefox does would have been nice addition as well

Win 8/8.1 automatically sync IE bookmarks, history and typed URLs. So i very much doubt the same feature will again be added to just IE alone when it's built in to the OS.

I bet the only thing you read from that article was the title...try reading stuff next time before referencing lolz #fail.

Edited by cetla, Jul 26 2013, 10:14am :

and i bet the only thing you read from that article was the "update", right? c'mon admit it.

No matter what you think or want to believe, this and every test made by the aforementioned "lab" is funded by Ms which roughly translates: less than zero credibility

,,,NEXT!

PS: Still waiting for the Bing search results lol

0--JLowzrif said,
NSS Labs = Microsoft sponsored BS


If you disagree with it that's ok. All I can say is read up on their methodology and make seek another opinion or run tests yourself.

I don't know much about it honestly but I know that if you want to prove something one way or another, you have to have multiple controlled tests.

King Joffrey said,
I use on Firefox Adblock+ and it has "Tracking protection filter"

That's fine, but we're talking about defaults and built-in features

Steve121178 said,
It's still nonsense, there are *NO* TPL's populated by default, you have to manually add them.
And that's still a built-in feature rather than a 3rd party plug-in.

Field Commander A9 said,
And that's still a built-in feature rather than a 3rd party plug-in.

i see the point being made here, its that whether a plugin or TPL the user still needs to a: know about it b: find and install/enable the plugin/tpl (both via built in 'stores').

so there's not much difference really, ibthink the TPL feature, being built in should come with some kind of prompt to expose it to more people.

Steve121178 said,
It's still nonsense, there are *NO* TPL's populated by default, you have to manually add them.

Actually if you enable the default IE's "Your Personalize List" (and I suspect it's enabled by default by many when they go through the initial set up of IE) the list will auto populate with scripts/trackers/beacons that are found on more than a minimum of 3 websites. You can adjust that option from 3-30 reoccuring sites.

You can basically get protected without subscribing to any maintained list.

Edited by cetla, Jul 26 2013, 9:59am :

cetla said,

Actually if you enable the default IE's "Your Personalize List" (and I suspect it's enabled by default by many when they go through the initial set up of IE) the list will auto populate with scripts/trackers/beacons that are found on more than a minimum of 3 websites. You can adjust that option from 3-30 reoccuring sites.

You can basically get protected without subscribing to any maintained list.


wait, you mean these "TPL" are nothing but InPrivate Filtering settings, that existed since IE8 ? that not something new ...

IE is not set to block all third-­party cookies by default; however, those third-­party cookies that do not have a compact privacy policy, or that save information that can be used to contact the user without explicit consent, are blocked by default. IE also restricts first-­party cookies that save information that can be used to contact the user without their implicit consent.

Thats already there since XP era, whats new in IE 10 regarding privacy protection?
DNT require "honest compliance" so its rather unrealistic approach, whats new?