TechSpot: Samsung 840 Pro SSD Review

Outside the realm of SandForce and Marvell, you have Samsung, whose 470 and 830 Series have been manufactured entirely in-house, including the controller, memory and cache. The latter drive launched last September with Samsung's S4LJ204X01-Y040 controller and has remained a solid option in terms of speed, reliability and affordability -- especially with the recent price drops, which have placed the 256GB 830 at only $0.76 per gigabyte, a minor and well justified $0.06 premium over the Vertex 3.

While the 830 Series and many of its year-old peers may still be attractive, Samsung is ready to move on to bigger and better things. As such, the company has announced a fresh lineup this week, including a new flagship offering, the SSD 840 Pro, which is said to refine the 830 Series' firmware with faster random and sustained performance as well as improved reliability.

Since most SSD competitors use the same rehashed components, Samsung has been in a unique position to shake things up over the last few years, and it's done a fine job. We had nearly no expectations for 2010's 470 Series, but we were pleasantly surprised when it dominated our performance charts. Last year's 830 Series gave a repeat performance, so we can only hope the same of the 840 Pro.

Read: Samsung SSD 840 Pro SSD Review
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6 Comments

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Meh, nothing too special here compared to any other SSD on the market now. OCZ has a new model coming out in Q4, which will be interesting.

We need new ideas since the latest drives maxed out the SATA 6.0Gb/s interface. Something like the Optimus SSD from SMART Storage with dual SATA connections. This allows this SSD to pull off 1GB/s in sequential read speed and 550 MB/s in write speed.

Gungel said,
We need new ideas since the latest drives maxed out the SATA 6.0Gb/s interface. Something like the Optimus SSD from SMART Storage with dual SATA connections. This allows this SSD to pull off 1GB/s in sequential read speed and 550 MB/s in write speed.

6Gbit should in theory support up to 768 MB/s, odd thing is even with SSD's I don't think I've really ever maxed out that read speed just due to how things use the data as its read having slower processing

Gungel said,
We need new ideas since the latest drives maxed out the SATA 6.0Gb/s interface. Something like the Optimus SSD from SMART Storage with dual SATA connections. This allows this SSD to pull off 1GB/s in sequential read speed and 550 MB/s in write speed.

Won't happen. Combining multiple connections is a feature of SAS (Serial Attached SCSI) known is wide-port.

I haven't read the spec, but I'm sure it isn't apart of SATA.

LogicalApex said,

Won't happen. Combining multiple connections is a feature of SAS (Serial Attached SCSI) known is wide-port.

I haven't read the spec, but I'm sure it isn't apart of SATA.

Yes, my mistake. I checked the specs and the Optimus is a SAS drive.

LogicalApex said,

Won't happen. Combining multiple connections is a feature of SAS (Serial Attached SCSI) known is wide-port.

I haven't read the spec, but I'm sure it isn't apart of SATA.

yeah, this is one of the reasons why SAS is an enterprise class port, and SATA is a standard class port

"The upstream SAS port can be configured as a wide port that lets multiple SAS connections (typically four) be treated as one SAS address. The result is a fat data pipe known as a SAS wide port."