The H.265 codec brings Ultra HDTV resolution in 2013

Just got a new, shiny 50” Full HD (1080p) TV set for your home video needs? Prepare to purchase something newer, shinier and with a much, much higher resolution soon. The Joint Collaborative Team on Video Coding reached a new milestone for the H.265 video codec during the past week, and is about to unleash the new “monster” video standard within the next year.

The H.265 video codec, also known as High Efficiency Video Coding or HEVC, is being designed to replace the current H.264 standard used for high definition and Full HD (1920x1080) video encoding and decoding. The Joint Collaborative Team, a collaboration effort between the Motion Picture Experts Group (MPEG) and ITU-T, has just achieved a “committee draft” in a meeting in San Jose.

The new video standard is expected to provide a huge difference in data transmission and streaming efficiency compared to the previous one, with one of the speakers present at the meeting suggesting a 67% improvement.

H.265 will be designed to support new, still to be created video delivery and streaming technologies from day one, including devices working at 4K and Ultra HDTV (also known as 8K or 4320p) resolutions. Just to put things in perspective, the Ultra HDTV definition contains about 16 times the amount of pixels present in a 1080p video stream.

Before appearing on the market as a proper video standard, H.265 will have to achieve two more milestones: the draft international standard meeting is expected to be held within six months from now and the final standard ratification should arrive in January 2013.

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Detection said,
Well.... thats one way to drastically reduce piracy, Ill be damned if I would be downloading many 500GB Movies

Expect internet speeds to catch up. 1gbit connections will be here soon

sanke1 said,

Expect internet speeds to catch up. 1gbit connections will be here soon

I still download @ 250 KB/s (when I'm lucky).

sanke1 said,

Expect internet speeds to catch up. 1gbit connections will be here soon

Here...... where? In the US we will have to wait a long time and will be extremely expensive.
Why so? Well, "taking care" of all those so called "People' s representatives", and related lobbyists, in Washington is very, very expensive.

UltraHD doesn't matter unless you have a screen bigger than 60". This has been out in Japan for quite sometime now. It's designed for real home theaters. Not 50" TV you have in your living room. The human eye can't tell the difference.

Do I need ultra HD? I mean really I think not in most cases, hell I can barely tell the difference between 720 or 1080, it's not like vhs to dvd where I was immediately like ok this is clearly better quality.

Will my caps and data rates be increased to account for this massive size increase with no additional cost...yeah I thought not.

Finally, I'm tired of seeing pixels on my tvs just because I sit closer to them, I am waiting til I can go up to a set and oul not see

I dont think it is possible for a video to get any clearer than 1080p... I mean studies show you need perfect 20/20 vision to fully enjoy 1080p anyways... this "Ultra HD" is just a gimmick and a waste of time and resources

Xerino said,
I dont think it is possible for a video to get any clearer than 1080p... I mean studies show you need perfect 20/20 vision to fully enjoy 1080p anyways... this "Ultra HD" is just a gimmick and a waste of time and resources

Actually, it is. But you'd need the right display for it. Also, anything beyond 1920x1080 isn't required for TVs in your house. Unless of course you sit right in front of your TV and the individual pixels bother you. Anyway, it doesn't mean progress shouldn't be made with high-resolution displays. If anything, it may lead to higher resolution displays for computers and higher pixel density for TVs. Personally though, I think it'd be a waste of money for any consumer. I'd rather see improvements to 1080p than new standards that we don't need.

what's the big deal? show us the content first at affordable mass-market price. you guys all forget how long it takes for the 1080p content to be widely available? i can't say even now.

I do not think this technology will be mainstream before four years at least but still, it is surely more interesting than 3D.....

Fritzly said,
I do not think this technology will be mainstream before four years at least but still, it is surely more interesting than 3D.....

It may not even be mainstream for more than four years. I don't think cable and satellite service providers offer 1080p streams because of bandwidth limitations. It's either 720p or 1080i and even then, it isn't full quality.

Hope it brings some compression efficiency and even better quality at existing resolutions as well. The standards committees suck because they only define the standards and create a reference implementation but don't take the effort of creating an optimized and highly usable implementation on at least the major platforms.

every generation of technology, there's always the people that say WE DONT NEED IT! it's hilarious. every generation it's the same thing.

i remember reading people's comments that dvd was better looking than blu-ray or HD DVD. i remember when people didnt like 720p television b/c it looked funny compared to their antiquated tube tvs. there were people that opposed 16:9 and wanted their 4:3 back b/c that's how it should look, damnit, and everything in widescreen looks stretched. i remember when people said you dont need 1080p for tv's less than 50"! omg oh noes!

people are hilarious. you wanna go back to dial-up too?

Lovely. I've been hoping for another reason to burn through my already **** usage cap. Wish the ISPs in Canada would stop ****ing around and give us unlimited usage or at least significantly higher monthly caps.

I can't wait to view ultra compressed video on an ultra HD display. Nothing like looking at large compression blocks in high definition. All at the same time it will probably require eight of Intel's latest CPU's. At the end it will cost us more and make others money. New TV, new set-top players, new computers, new media, new cameras (video and picture), more bandwidth, new satellite, new cable box. Yay!

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