Windows 8 demoed on TI-based tablet

Earlier this week, Texas Instruments announced that it would be showing off how Microsoft's upcoming Windows 8 OS would run on a tablet with TI's upcoming OMAP4470 processor. True to its word, the company did indeed show a tablet running a pre-beta version of Windows 8 this week at CES 2012.

News.com reports that TI showed the demo under some rather restrictive conditions. There was no video allowed but the company did show Windows 8 running Internet Explorer on the CNN.com web site. According to the article, "Scrolling was fluid," and added that there was no jerkiness seen on the demo.

The TI OMAP4470 processor itself is scheduled to be released in smartphones and tablets later this year with TI saying that it will have a 1.8 GHz clock speed. The ARM-based processor is supposed to be 20 percent faster than the previous 4460 chip.

There is some question as to when Microsoft will actually release the ARM version of Windows 8. However the head of ARM, CEO Warren East, has indicated that he would like for Microsoft to take its time with the ARM port, saying, "I'd much rather wait however long it takes to get a quality experience than compromise."

Image via Brooke Crothers

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17 Comments

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man, it's pretty scary how Windows 8 seems to be able to run on everything despite it not being open-source or anything. Truly an incredible feat achieved by Windows over the years.

Texas Instruments making computers again, that's kind of cool in itself.

I wonder if it will interface with my TI-99/4a?

TRC said,
Texas Instruments making computers again, that's kind of cool in itself.

I wonder if it will interface with my TI-99/4a?

They always made computers, just in stuff that doesn't have user interfaces, usually embedded computers... but these are just reference devices, not something they'd sell

FMH said,
Question: Why can't they make the demo devices a little pretty?

Why? There's no point, if they'll never be sold or are only sold as a developer kit.

SharpGreen said,

Why? There's no point, if they'll never be sold or are only sold as a developer kit.

But that's my point. They can spend a few extra thousand dollars, and make the device more appealing.
Things which may appeal to a "non-technical" buyer, such as thinness, material, and 'look'.

If they designed this tablet to look "pretty", an average consumer would go and say, "woah, I am getting a TI-based tablet, when it comes out!"
It is about making an emotional connection at the product demonstration.

FMH said,

But that's my point. They can spend a few extra thousand dollars, and make the device more appealing.
Things which may appeal to a "non-technical" buyer, such as thinness, material, and 'look'.

If they designed this tablet to look "pretty", an average consumer would go and say, "woah, I am getting a TI-based tablet, when it comes out!"
It is about making an emotional connection at the product demonstration.

Normal people don't look at sites like this. They see them in stores.

FMH said,
Question: Why can't they make the demo devices a little pretty?

because most of these are what is called "reference devices" aka plain old get what is there and the OEM makes it pretty

It doesn't actually look that bad. Its mostly the ghastly TI logo that makes it look odd.

FMH said,
Question: Why can't they make the demo devices a little pretty?