Windows 8 name becomes official as Microsoft announces Windows 8 SKUs

Microsoft has just made it official, there will be a total of 3 SKUs (or 5 SKUs if you count Enterprise and China specific editions) for Windows 8 and they are as follows: Windows 8, Windows 8 Pro and Windows RT. Windows RT will be for Windows on Arm devices and will only be available on pre-installed devices. 

There has been previous chatter suggesting that Microsoft could muddy the waters up with many different SKUs but the company has chosen to keep it simple with three primary SKUs. The post does note that there will be a SKU for China too:  "For China and a small set of select emerging markets, we will offer a local language-only edition of Windows 8."

Notably absent from the list is a Windows 8 Enterprise edition. While we will not venture to guess if Microsoft will announce Enterprise level SKUs at a later date, just know that we could possibly see more editions for the corporate world.

But, as it stands now, we are graced with only 3 SKUs with only two available for purchase. The slimming of editions will make it easier for the consumer to pick the version that fits their needs best.

So what is it Neowin, which version will you be picking up when the OS goes on sale later this year?

[Update] Would you look at that, as soon as we mention the Enterprise SKU the blog post got updated to say that following: 

As with previous versions of Windows, we will also have an edition of Windows 8 specifically for those enterprise customers with Software Assurance agreements. Windows 8 Enterprise includes all the features of Windows 8 Pro plus features for IT organization that enable PC management and deployment, advanced security, virtualization, new mobility scenarios, and much more. 

 

Feature name

Windows 8

Windows 8 Pro

Windows RT

Upgrades from Windows 7 Starter, Home Basic, Home Premium

x

x

 

Upgrades from Windows 7 Professional, Ultimate

 

x

 

Start screen, Semantic Zoom, Live Tiles

x

x

x

Windows Store

x

x

x

Apps (Mail, Calendar, People, Messaging, Photos, SkyDrive, Reader, Music, Video)

x

x

x

Microsoft Office (Word, Excel, PowerPoint, OneNote)

   

x

Internet Explorer 10

x

x

x

Device encryption

   

x

Connected standby

x

x

x

Microsoft account

x

x

x

Desktop

x

x

x

Installation of x86/64 and desktop software

x

x

 

Updated Windows Explorer

x

x

x

Windows Defender

x

x

x

SmartScreen

x

x

x

Windows Update

x

x

x

Enhanced Task Manager

x

x

x

Switch languages on the fly (Language Packs)

x

x

x

Better multiple monitor support

x

x

x

Storage Spaces

x

x

 

Windows Media Player

x

x

 

Exchange ActiveSync

x

x

x

File history

x

x

x

ISO / VHD mount

x

x

x

Mobile broadband features

x

x

x

Picture password

x

x

x

Play To

x

x

x

Remote Desktop (client)

x

x

x

Reset and refresh your PC

x

x

x

Snap

x

x

x

Touch and Thumb keyboard

x

x

x

Trusted boot

x

x

x

VPN client

x

x

x

BitLocker and BitLocker To Go

 

x

 

Boot from VHD

 

x

 

Client Hyper-V

 

x

 

Domain Join

 

x

 

Encrypting File System

 

x

 

Group Policy

 

x

 

Remote Desktop (host)

 

x

 
 

 

Report a problem with article
Previous Story

Windows Phone Bing Translator app updated, increases the awesomeness

Next Story

Media Center will be a “media pack” add-on to Windows 8 Pro

148 Comments

Commenting is disabled on this article.

You should read the article

"Microsoft has just made it official, there will be a total of 3 SKUs (or 5 SKUs if you count Enterprise and China specific editions)"

ThePitt said,
wtf is SKU? Damn that acronym really looks bad.

from what I understand the sku are the numbers below the barcode.

It's the fourth time Neowin has published Windows' SKU info!

XP, Vista, 7, and now 8!

Reading this has brought me deja vu when the previous releases were anticipated...

I say it's a little milestone for the community too!

so now if i go buy a desktop/laptop at retail stores, there's only windows 8. if i look at some pc tablets, there's only windows RT. isn't that awesome?

if i'm an IT pro, i just take windows 8 pro. if i want the software assurance agreement, i take windows 8 enterprise, with other benefits as well. isn't that also awesome?

este said,
And why does China get its own SKU?

Those are probably region locked and cheaper then normal SKU-s. I think I saw something on somewhere saying that Windows is most pirated in China.

I don't understand MS's thought process. They are trying to mash everything into one package, but it just complicates things and makes the Win8 experience a disaster. It would be nice if they'd create some distinction between their products. I'd like to see something like this:

Windows 8 Desktop Home (w/ MCE)
Windows 8 Desktop Pro (strictly for business)
Windows 8 Desktop Server
Windows 8 Metro Phone
Windows 8 Metro Tablet

Metro systems should just be metro, no desktop. Desktop systems should be just that, no metro. The desktop is still a viable environment, especially in business, and will be for quite some time to come. I am a systems manager for a medium-sized business and I've been running the CP since its release. I will NOT, under any circumstances, be recommending to the owners that this company upgrade to Win8. It is an IT nightmare.

Slaquor said,
I don't understand MS's thought process. They are trying to mash everything into one package, but it just complicates things and makes the Win8 experience a disaster. It would be nice if they'd create some distinction between their products. I'd like to see something like this:

Windows 8 Desktop Home (w/ MCE)
Windows 8 Desktop Pro (strictly for business)
Windows 8 Desktop Server
Windows 8 Metro Phone
Windows 8 Metro Tablet

Metro systems should just be metro, no desktop. Desktop systems should be just that, no metro. The desktop is still a viable environment, especially in business, and will be for quite some time to come. I am a systems manager for a medium-sized business and I've been running the CP since its release. I will NOT, under any circumstances, be recommending to the owners that this company upgrade to Win8. It is an IT nightmare.

You're suggestion wouldn't work.
Tablet signifies that it would work on all tablets. When WinRT is referring to ARM devices, ARM devices won't just be tablets, and the same version of Windows 8 will be on x86 tablets and desktops.
This is simple enough.

Possession said,

You're suggestion wouldn't work.
Tablet signifies that it would work on all tablets. When WinRT is referring to ARM devices, ARM devices won't just be tablets, and the same version of Windows 8 will be on x86 tablets and desktops.
This is simple enough.


I get that, my point was separating the Metro and Desktop environments. Each have their place and work well independently, but neither belong together. Simply saying "It's the future, get used to it" is just absurd and completely impractical for the professional world.

Slaquor said,
I don't understand MS's thought process. They are trying to mash everything into one package, but it just complicates things and makes the Win8 experience a disaster. It would be nice if they'd create some distinction between their products. I'd like to see something like this:

Windows 8 Desktop Home (w/ MCE)
Windows 8 Desktop Pro (strictly for business)
Windows 8 Desktop Server
Windows 8 Metro Phone
Windows 8 Metro Tablet

Metro systems should just be metro, no desktop. Desktop systems should be just that, no metro. The desktop is still a viable environment, especially in business, and will be for quite some time to come. I am a systems manager for a medium-sized business and I've been running the CP since its release. I will NOT, under any circumstances, be recommending to the owners that this company upgrade to Win8. It is an IT nightmare.

You have got it so right!

Said so often elsewhere. Tablet UI is the the same as desktop UI, so trying to make one UI for both form factors results in a "compromised UI" for both. MS's decision to not have the ability to disable the Metro UI is going to come back and bit them hard (VISTA, round two?)

As I always said, the Windows RT experience will be GREAT on a tablet for accomplishing basic tasks (and I will probably buy one). I don't hate Windows RT, I hate how it behaves on a desktop computer. It's like using a Ferrari in the mud. Ferrari = sexy. In mud or snow? It sucks.

I see where Microsoft wants to go, I recognize Windows RT has a lot of qualities, I like the updating tiles/notifications, I like how it simplifies some basic tasks (which is perfect for a tablet usage, when you're on the go), but I can't imagine myself using this environment at work, in a productivity context, 10 hours a day.

I mean, switching between Win RT and the classic desktop again and again and again? It won't happen... I will have a nervous breakdown I'm using a 3 monitors setup, with 7 or 8 programs tiled and organized in a specific way (Useless to say the 2 "apps" limit WinRT imposes is a no-go for me). And I know for sure some of these programs will NEVER have a WinRT version or equivalent.

With Windows 8, I have to deal with 2 paradigms, and the one that is the most productive for my very specific needs is about to get killed. It sucks.

Edited by myxomatosis, Apr 17 2012, 10:02am :

what does Rt stand for? I'll be getting Windows 8 Pro as I can join to the domain Which remidns me I'll be setting up a fresh Windows 8 Server domain from scratch, will be interesting

Windows RT as in based on the Windows Runtime Win RT. To point out its Metro focus I suppose . Also people might say RT means "Runs on Tablet" similar to XP being "eXPerience". Come to think of it, Windows RT, Windows XP, coincidence?

Windows RT is an odd choice - the consumer facing brand apparently being named for the runtime environment that the consumer frankly won't care about. I suspect that the Microsoft branding/versioning is being deemphasised in favour of focussing on OEM branding of ARM devices "Powered by Windows" or something similar.

Great move going to less SKU's, far less confusion, finally learned their lesson there.

Horrible move not including RDP host (not even 1 session) or domain join in the base product (guess we're back to xp home model), yet they include storage spaces. Hopefully final pricing reflects Pro as afforable for the masses.

Windows RT? Seriously MS that's the name? lol though I guess it doesn't matter since it's not really a choice provided to consumers, more a here is what comes on your device, that you can't use in the enterprise.

"which version will you be picking up when the OS goes on sale later this year?"
Well seeing as though there is really only one version (PRO) for real use, and the base 8 product is for grandma and grandpa, it's a pointless question given this audience.


So Windows 8 Pro is basically the "Ultimate" edition, right? So there will be just two editions of Windows 8, well that is nice and clean. I like it.

Mazhar said,
So Windows 8 Pro is basically the "Ultimate" edition, right? So there will be just two editions of Windows 8, well that is nice and clean. I like it.

No. Windows 8 Pro is the Pro version. I don't understand why people keep reffering to Ultimate, the Pro version was there before Ultimate

Salutary7 said,
"RT"? How does that appeal to the average consumer?

RT will only be shipped on new ARM devices. It's a different name to show it can't run legacy x86 apps that aren't rewritten.

-Razorfold said,
RT is for ARM devices only...
Read the article.

Possession said,

RT will only be shipped on new ARM devices.

Yeah.. that's in the second sentence. I didn't miss it. I'm talking about selling points. RT is a crappy moniker that doesn't appeal to consumers.

Salutary7 said,

Yeah.. that's in the second sentence. I didn't miss it. I'm talking about selling points. RT is a crappy moniker that doesn't appeal to consumers.


It won't be sold to customers....it will come pre-installed on ARM devices and all the customer will know is that his tablet comes with Windows 8.

You can't walk into a store and buy Windows 8 for your Android tablet AFAIK.

They almost got it right except that WMP should have been on Windows RT and Windows 8 should have been everything Windows 7 was+Metro optional for x86/x64 editions.

xpclient said,
They almost got it right except that WMP should have been on Windows RT and Windows 8 should have been everything Windows 7 was+Metro optional for x86/x64 editions.

WMP is useless on WinRT. There's a Metro app for music that will be better on tablets. You need to get over your Metro hate.

Dot Matrix said,

WMP is useless on WinRT. There's a Metro app for music that will be better on tablets. You need to get over your Metro hate.

By your logic, all desktop apps are useless on WinRT. You need to get over your obsessive compulsive disorder to reply to everyone who doesn't like Metro and accept that it's ugly and unproductive.

xpclient said,

By your logic, all desktop apps are useless on WinRT. You need to get over your obsessive compulsive disorder to reply to everyone who doesn't like Metro and accept that it's ugly and unproductive.

How the **** are desktop apps going to appeal to consumers, when they rejected Windows 7 tablets? You're never gonna find Windows RT on a desktop system, so relax.

xpclient said,

You need to get over your obsessive compulsive disorder to reply to everyone who doesn't like Metro and accept that it's ugly and unproductive.

You need to get over your obsessive compulsive disorder to comment on every article and thread about how you think metro is ugly and unproductive.

rfirth said,

You need to get over your obsessive compulsive disorder to comment on every article and thread about how you think metro is ugly and unproductive.

You're mistaken. I don't.

l33under said,
All I can say about Win8 I hate the metro menu

All I can say about this comment is that it's unproductive and completely off topic.

You can now do in place upgrades from Starter, Home Basic and Home Premium to Professional. This should save users a lot of trouble.

KomaWeiss said,
They really messed up by still having a x86 version. X86 is so useless nowadays as computers support 64bit now.

Not at all. I still have an x86 based netbook that runs Windows 8 CP great.

rfirth said,
Not at all. I still have an x86 based netbook that runs Windows 8 CP great.

Just out of curiosity - what is Windows 8 CP like when compared to Windows 7 on the same machine? from what I have heard Microsoft has done a lot of optimisations so I wonder whether it has resulted in a better experience on low powered CPU's such as the Atom.

KomaWeiss said,
They really messed up by still having a x86 version. X86 is so useless nowadays as computers support 64bit now.

Have you ever taken into account there might be a large installation of 32 bit systems out there that is why Microsoft continues to support? You don't have any proof why it would be pointless, but Microsoft does, since their telemetry data and the amount of systems hitting Windows Update might be a significant percentage of 32 bit Windows installations. Having Windows 8 available on 32 bit systems adds useful value to the years of a system. Companies can cut cost by being able to upgrade to modern versions of Windows without significant hardware upgrade. This can also be used as a competitive edge. Because systems last much longer than they use to, if Microsoft ends support for 32 bit processors, it will just be an opportunity for Linux.

So next time, investigate before assuming.

KomaWeiss said,
They really messed up by still having a x86 version. X86 is so useless nowadays as computers support 64bit now.
How exactly are they "useless"? Also, how does not releasing a product for a still fairly sizable group of users a good business decision?

virtorio said,
How exactly are they "useless"? Also, how does not releasing a product for a still fairly sizable group of users a good business decision?

You do realise that x64 does run x86 applications? If they killed x86 install CD doesn't mean they killed x86 altogether. Oh wait, you probably never realised that.

KomaWeiss said,

You do realise that x64 does run x86 applications? If they killed x86 install CD doesn't mean they killed x86 altogether.


Actually I'm referring to older computer and netbooks with 32-bit processors, and businesses that are using older hardware (industrial printers, for example) that do not have 64-bit drivers.

So once again, how is making a product these potential customers can't buy a smart decision?

Oh wait, you probably never realised that.

Yes, because the the only thing I've used a PC for before is Mavis Beacon: Typing Tutor.

Edited by virtorio, Apr 17 2012, 5:37am :

KomaWeiss said,

You do realise that x64 does run x86 applications? If they killed x86 install CD doesn't mean they killed x86 altogether. Oh wait, you probably never realised that.


you do realise not all hardware is 64 bits? and that some applications are only 16bits? and that using a VM isnt always worth it?
still have a laptop with 32bit architecture i use from time to time, would like to get Win8 on this when it goes RTM

besides, its microsoft and windows, they do their best to keep backwards compatibility working as good as possible

KomaWeiss said,

You do realise that x64 does run x86 applications? If they killed x86 install CD doesn't mean they killed x86 altogether. Oh wait, you probably never realised that.


Windows 7 64 bit cannot run 32 bit drivers.

I hope they are eliminating the upgrade versions and just have full versions at a reasonable price point. Microsoft Office has done it, it is time Windows goes in the same direction to avoid confusion.
- Windows 8 - $100
- Windows 8 Pro - $200

Sell 500 million copies in 6 months.

Only two desktop versions of Windows 8? That is lame, and will make spending big bucks on Technet worthless. I will also bet that businesses will not upgrade to Windows 8.

jd100 said,
Only two desktop versions of Windows 8? That is lame, and will make spending big bucks on Technet worthless. I will also bet that businesses will not upgrade to Windows 8.
Considering software licenses from TechNet are for testing purposes only, how does it make TechNet worthless?

virtorio said,
Considering software licenses from TechNet are for testing purposes only, how does it make TechNet worthless?

Technet: Warez for the 21'st Century. TechNet is seriously abused these days. Yes, it's for testing purposes only, but so many people buy a 200$ subscription, just so they can go and download a "legal" copy of everything MS made, so they could argue they paid for it.... nevermind the fact that what they're doing is a violation of the TechNet agreement.

warwagon said,
Oh god, why does Windows RT have the option for the desktop. Are they trying to fail?

Why is it hard for you to imagine desktop on ARM. I can easily imagine my self browsing on the sofa with a tablet and later in the day plug that same tablet into a keyboard docking station and write a doc or update an excel sheet; two tasks which I see them better suited for a desktop interface than touch-based metro.

A couple of reasons I can think of:

1. The desktop environment still isn't very good with touch
2. Average users are going to be confused as to why their existing apps aren't working in the desktop environment

virtorio said,
A couple of reasons I can think of:

1. The desktop environment still isn't very good with touch
2. Average users are going to be confused as to why their existing apps aren't working in the desktop environment

Agreed. The Desktop side of the ARM tablet is going to make it feel like such a piece of **** compared to an iPad. I'm just going off my experiences, with the desktop and my x86 tablet.

warwagon said,
Oh god, why does Windows RT have the option for the desktop. Are they trying to fail?

Because Microsoft Office runs in desktop mode since it hasn't be ported over to Metro yet. As for end user confusion - that is their own fault for not asking questions. If I was an end user and I heard that my computer had an Intel processor and my tablet had an ARM one my first assumption would be that they can't run the same stuff because they're different processors.

Edited by Mr Nom Nom's, Apr 17 2012, 2:55am :

Mr Nom Nom's said,

Because Microsoft Office runs in desktop mode since it hasn't be ported over to Metro yet. As for end user confusion - that is their own fault for not asking questions. If I was an end user and I heard that my computer had an Intel processor and my tablet had an ARM one my first assumption would be that they can't run the same stuff because they're different processors.

If it's ported to ARM have fun using office on a 10.1 inch touch display (or even keyboard) The only app that might be useful is powerpoint.

Mr Nom Nom's said,

Because Microsoft Office runs in desktop mode since it hasn't be ported over to Metro yet. As for end user confusion - that is their own fault for not asking questions. If I was an end user and I heard that my computer had an Intel processor and my tablet had an ARM one my first assumption would be that they can't run the same stuff because they're different processors.


Then you gravely overestimate the average users understanding of processor architectures.

Mr Nom Nom's said,

If I was an end user and I heard that my computer had an Intel processor and my tablet had an ARM one my first assumption would be that they can't run the same stuff because they're different processors.

Your computer has an Intel processor? Mine has an AMD processor... we can't run the same stuff? /s

virtorio said,
1. The desktop environment still isn't very good with touch

BS.
The improvements to touch over Win7 are amazing. They've managed to compensate for the fat finger problem nicely on small displays.
I have no issue hitting any of the win32 controls on my touchsmart tm2 where in Win7 days I often missed by a pixel or 5.

Lord Venom said,
So Pro replaces Ultimate? Interesting.

Any differences between Windows 8 Pro and Windows 8 Enterprise?

McKay said,
Any differences between Windows 8 Pro and Windows 8 Enterprise?

According to this:

As with previous versions of Windows, we will also have an edition of Windows 8 specifically for those enterprise customers with Software Assurance agreements. Windows 8 Enterprise includes all the features of Windows 8 Pro plus features for IT organization that enable PC management and deployment, advanced security, virtualization, new mobility scenarios, and much more.

Apart from some additional deployment tools I would say that there will be no difference at all.

Now that there are fewer versions and the argument of the "confusing" number of versions is gone, let the complaints of fewer choices begin.

nohone said,
Now that there are fewer versions and the argument of the "confusing" number of versions is gone, let the complaints of fewer choices begin.

I'm surprised no one is crying foul over a missing "Start Menu Edition" or "Metro Free Version".

I think that after this:

Dot Matrix said,
Well, to get it all out of the way:

Metro will fail.
It has no future.
I don't want it on the desktop.
Doesn't work with a mouse.
It's ugly.
People will never use it.
Companies are wasting their time.
Windows is fail.
Microsoft doesn't know what they are doing.
Microsoft is fail.
Where's my Start Button/Menu?

Did I miss any?


With that said, I love the concept of live tiles, and hope to see the idea progress further. I'd love to have a Facebook and Twitter tiles on my screen to complete the setup.

no one has anything else to say. You packed it up

Dot Matrix said,

I'm surprised no one is crying foul over a missing "Start Menu Edition" or "Metro Free Version".

Just let them hold out on Windows XP, and what will be the next group, the Windows 7 Holdouts.

Something tells me (potential future) competition has forced them back to 2 editions. Yes, I am thinking something Linux based is their concern. I believe the future is web based applications and at the end of the day, only a decent Internet browser is required which can be found on any free OS or mobile phone. The shift will start after a decent web based office production suite is created (which can be ran independently on a company's server). Microsoft OWA is decent enough as a email client for now.

ShMaunder said,
Something tells me (potential future) competition has forced them back to 2 editions. Yes, I am thinking something Linux based is their concern. I believe the future is web based applications and at the end of the day, only a decent Internet browser is required which can be found on any free OS or mobile phone. The shift will start after a decent web based office production suite is created (which can be ran independently on a company's server). Microsoft OWA is decent enough as a email client for now.

Because Linux is all the rage these days. Most users never encountered anything more than Home Premium or Professional, so it makes little sense to have longer names that end up getting shortened anyway.

dagamer34 said,

Because Linux is all the rage these days. Most users never encountered anything more than Home Premium or Professional, so it makes little sense to have longer names that end up getting shortened anyway.

But they have removed editions, not just renamed. They have removed the top most pricey edition called ultimate. They would not have done this unless they need to focus their marketing efforts on fewer editions. Also, it wasn't like I don't hear many people talking about their ultimate copy of Windows 7 on the Internet, therefore, they were selling them.

As for Linux, I think you've just missed the point if that is sarcasm. You and your win32 applications will be tied with Windows for many years to come. This is probably due to games, cad, creative software etc. etc. I know I will need Windows as a secondary OS for these types of software. Last time I went inside a company though, most of the admin/hr/finance employees used the companies in house web applications. Only reason they ran Windows was due to Microsoft Office and Outlook.

With the recent advances in docking stations for android mobile phones, Chrome OS, or any freebie operating system. Companies could strip the licensing of Windows, Office and CALs in place of something free (currently, the most mature/stable free OS is something based on the Linux kernel). Personally, I think that smart phones and a dock will be used to replace the desktop. Furthermore, companies will have the freedom (due to open source) to tailor or brand it as much as they like. IMHO, this is a natural progression.

ShMaunder said,

But they have removed editions, not just renamed. They have removed the top most pricey edition called ultimate. They would not have done this unless they need to focus their marketing efforts on fewer editions. Also, it wasn't like I don't hear many people talking about their ultimate copy of Windows 7 on the Internet, therefore, they were selling them.

As for Linux, I think you've just missed the point if that is sarcasm. You and your win32 applications will be tied with Windows for many years to come. This is probably due to games, cad, creative software etc. etc. I know I will need Windows as a secondary OS for these types of software. Last time I went inside a company though, most of the admin/hr/finance employees used the companies in house web applications. Only reason they ran Windows was due to Microsoft Office and Outlook.

With the recent advances in docking stations for android mobile phones, Chrome OS, or any freebie operating system. Companies could strip the licensing of Windows, Office and CALs in place of something free (currently, the most mature/stable free OS is something based on the Linux kernel). Personally, I think that smart phones and a dock will be used to replace the desktop. Furthermore, companies will have the freedom (due to open source) to tailor or brand it as much as they like. IMHO, this is a natural progression.


They didn't 'remove' Ultimate. *Everything* that defined Ultimate editions in past versions of the OS is now rolled into Pro. If anything, they 'removed' Pro and replaced it with Ultimate under Pro's name.

So you can bet your butt the higher price point of Windows 7 Ultimate will still exist going forward. The real question is going to be where the price of the basic edition will fall, since it's roughly equivalent to Windows 7 Home Premium, but the loss of other editions means they'll have to reconfigure pricing to keep overall profit margins roughly the same between just the two editions.

Also, it will *never* be the year of the Linux desktop, and your little narrative is the exact same narrative that's been made for the past 15 years from proponents of the Linux platform.

Linux has only--ONLY--gained ground when it ignored desktop computing and targeted specialized or emerging markets. This belief that things will magically change because businesses are "free to choose" (btw, that has been said about businesses re: linux for over a DECADE and defines the whole year-of-the-linux-desktop mockery) is delusional on the scale of an abusive relationship where you convince yourself you just have to change them and things will get better.

Linux fails at being sexy, it fails at being a brand, it fails at getting behind other brands, and to fantasize about a future of Android tablets docking into desktops when Android tablets are a hysterically sad percentage of tablet sales today furthers the appearance of delusion.

Hell, the only Android tablet that has had notable sales is the one Android tablet that did everything in its power to NOT be an Android tablet--the Kindle Fire.

ShMaunder said,

Personally, I think that smart phones and a dock will be used to replace the desktop. Furthermore, companies will have the freedom (due to open source) to tailor or brand it as much as they like. IMHO, this is a natural progression.

Great. So we'll have an Android like mess all over our desktops.

Perfect.

I agree with you regarding the "Year of Linux on Desktop" lark - I never have believed in this myself as the desktop market is too saturated. But I'm not specifically talking about the desktop here. I'm talking about the mobile computer, specifically smart phones for use in non-niche areas such as admin for word processing and spreadsheet work (which is an emerging market in itself). Yes, Linux has always failed on the desktop because there is no other comprehensive office suite that works as well as Microsoft Office and is as compatible for opening doc/docx etc file formats (as well as the point made in the third paragraph regarding neglect). Furthermore, IT classes in schools only teach Microsoft based products which is disgusting (its like a unbreakable cycle). As I said in my original post, if a fully fledged web based office suite platform emerged, then these devices can be used to replace every desktop computer in an office building and allows the employee to work on the go as well without messing around.

I wouldn't have believed this myself until I tried an Atrix with a dock (aka Webtop), and was shocked that a full desktop experience appeared on my monitor and worked quite well from such a device. I think the processor needs a little more beef to handle a full web application, though this will progress rather quickly.

As for Linux generally, it has been getting far more attention from hardware manufactures in the recent years due to its server share (don't forget it wasn't long ago when IIS ruled the web server), and now mobile platforms like ChromeOS & Android have a place in the market. Its no longer ran only in educational institutes for research purposes. It is breaking the many years of neglect from hardware manufactures to produce decent drivers for it. Even Microsoft have committed drivers to it due to its demand in the server market recently. As for tablets, personally I think they're a bit of a fad like the netbook which also tried it on with Linux as well (different topic though).

ShMaunder said,
Something tells me (potential future) competition has forced them back to 2 editions. Yes, I am thinking something Linux based is their concern. I believe the future is web based applications and at the end of the day, only a decent Internet browser is required which can be found on any free OS or mobile phone. The shift will start after a decent web based office production suite is created (which can be ran independently on a company's server). Microsoft OWA is decent enough as a email client for now.

And something tells me you're wrong - here we are in 2012 and the same song and dance I have heard for the last 15 years is continuing to this day, 'XYZ is the year of Linux on the desktop" then low and behold it never comes to fruition. There is a reason why Windows dominants the enterprise - because Microsoft gives enterprise customers what they want in the way of enterprise services, support, training, etc. which no competitor has yet been able to match. Combine those factors with a close relationship with OEM's and the flexible licensing programmes one has to ask why even bother with the alternatives?

Mr Nom Nom's said,
There is a reason why Windows dominants the enterprise - because Microsoft gives enterprise customers what they want in the way of enterprise services, support, training, etc. which no competitor has yet been able to match.

Windows is dominant, because it was "the first". It has nothing to do with quality, services or support but it has everything to do with Windows having a good ten-fifteen years of head start compared to the likes of OSX and Linux before they started to slowly gain traction.

Mr Nom Nom's said,
Combine those factors with a close relationship with OEM's and the flexible licensing programmes one has to ask why even bother with the alternatives?

Because Windows is slow, clunky, restrictive and hard to tailor to your specific needs, not to mention extremely expensive once you start to deploy it en masse- all of which have been slowly noted by professionals and hobbyist users alike.

Linux and alternative OS haven't grabbed the desktop yet but they have completely and utterly obliterated Microsoft in the tablet and phone markets, something that is sure to have an effect in the desktop space as well.

You keep chanting the mantra that no one would look at alternatives, yet Windows usage is dropping year by year. It's not a fast drop but rather slow and steady, like Rome and the barbarians.

MiukuMac said,

Windows is dominant, because it was "the first". It has nothing to do with quality, services or support but it has everything to do with Windows having a good ten-fifteen years of head start compared to the likes of OSX and Linux before they started to slowly gain traction.

Oh god, your so wrong here.
Typical MS hater i guess, your loss tho, however heres my try

Microsoft offers enterprise solutions unlike any competitor is able to give. From early DOS years. Microsoft helps/supports development of cooperate applications and services to run as smooth as a baby's bottom on Windows. Microsoft also makes the most effort into beeing backwards compatible, unlike any of its competition, your still able to run stuff designed for 9x which was running on a whole different kernel. The bias you have towards MS is probably grown back in the 9x days. Never ever giving NT a chance eh?

Because Windows is slow, clunky, restrictive and hard to tailor to your specific needs, not to mention extremely expensive once you start to deploy it en masse- all of which have been slowly noted by professionals and hobbyist users alike.

Linux and alternative OS haven't grabbed the desktop yet but they have completely and utterly obliterated Microsoft in the tablet and phone markets, something that is sure to have an effect in the desktop space as well.

You keep chanting the mantra that no one would look at alternatives, yet Windows usage is dropping year by year. It's not a fast drop but rather slow and steady, like Rome and the barbarians.


What is so slow about windows? Does any other OS support the GPU layer/API windows offers? increasing its performance by miles due to not letting individual applications control the resources of the hardware.
Windows is not expensive, on the contrary. Due to MS supporting training (every license already has complete service desk support with MS, altho consumer licenses its just 30min a year iirc). You are not limited to the knowledge of your staff, as you are with generic Linux environment. Plus due to the rarety of Linux specialists over Windows specialists, the staff is very expensive, its training its also very expensive. and when a major problem arises... your left at the mercy of your staff and/or the generosity of others. With MS however, you always have a company behind you with a competent IT staff that will help you out (often for free) if a problem ocures.

Your still with the mindset of Win9X times, should really look around and stop being a stereotypical MS hater.9x indeed was total sh*t, WinME was their last chance. And indeed as an OS WinME wasnt magic (altho i personally prefered it over 98 and 2000 was not supportive of many games at the time). But bringing NT with XP was a good thing (in the end, after SP2 )
On top of that, you should really lookup the power of Windows. How the OS architecture is many years ahead of its competition. OSX isnt close, Linux isnt, none will be.

Oh and btw, one of the reasons Android is so popular, is also why Chrome is 'popular'. Its because the IT tech friends everywhere tell people to 'install chrome, get an android' etc. MS is way behind in these markets, but no worries Im slowly starting so see people getting WP devices around me. Just a shame MS has always lacking on its marketing side. Which is what Apple and Google are good at. So many mindless drones they have at their command

MiukuMac said,

Windows is dominant, because it was "the first". It has nothing to do with quality, services or support but it has everything to do with Windows having a good ten-fifteen years of head start compared to the likes of OSX and Linux before they started to slowly gain traction.


Because Windows is slow, clunky, restrictive and hard to tailor to your specific needs, not to mention extremely expensive once you start to deploy it en masse- all of which have been slowly noted by professionals and hobbyist users alike.

Linux and alternative OS haven't grabbed the desktop yet but they have completely and utterly obliterated Microsoft in the tablet and phone markets, something that is sure to have an effect in the desktop space as well.

You keep chanting the mantra that no one would look at alternatives, yet Windows usage is dropping year by year. It's not a fast drop but rather slow and steady, like Rome and the barbarians.

Keep trollin' iPreacher, we're all listening.

Guys, my original point was focusing on users that run Microsoft Office and Outlook mainly. Not users that require specialist software that are mainly built using the Windows API. I was making a point that they can transit to using a mobile phone and a dock (with monitor, keyboard and mouse attached) if a half decent web based office suite surfaced.

@Shadowzz - I'm not sure this is true any longer regarding the "Microsoft offers enterprise solutions unlike any competitor is able to give.". If it were, then there wouldn't be a huge transition happening from Windows servers to Linux servers. I'm sure you have seen Red Hat and Canonical's business support services. You can't say that they're not doing well as of late (Red Hat is a billion dollar company). The GPU stack is nice in Windows, though that won't help Microsoft in cases where users use Microsoft Office and Outlook mainly. I wonder what the current market share of desktop users are that are specifically users of office suites only, I bet you it isn't small.

@SirEvan - Can you please be more specific to this "iPreacher" business? What are your views then?

I can't be the only person seeing this big opening in the market? Motorola can see it as they made CES 2011 with their Atrix and the Webtop application. Even Ubuntu are making a mobile OS that I believe will also be designed to run as a full desktop when docked.

Just a little prediction for now - those of us who want an OS to run our desktop computers will be using Windows 7 for at least another ten years - in the same way that XP continues to flourish around the world, long after its publication. So far I see no reason to change to Windows 8 (having tried the preview) unless the final version can be configured to appear with the simplicity of Windows 7. I won't be using a tablet or a touch screen for my office.

dogmatix said,
Just a little prediction for now - those of us who want an OS to run our desktop computers will be using Windows 7 for at least another ten years - in the same way that XP continues to flourish around the world, long after its publication. So far I see no reason to change to Windows 8 (having tried the preview) unless the final version can be configured to appear with the simplicity of Windows 7. I won't be using a tablet or a touch screen for my office.

This prediction will only ring true if MS does another period of null OS releases, while I don't imagine that Win8 adoption will be high for businesses, I do think that sales of Win 9 will have that adoption. Businesses have often done the skip a version thing, and if Vista to 7 was any indication, what they have for us in Win 8 will be better and more refined in Win 9, and be much more popular

dogmatix said,
Just a little prediction for now - those of us who want an OS to run our desktop computers will be using Windows 7 for at least another ten years - in the same way that XP continues to flourish around the world, long after its publication. So far I see no reason to change to Windows 8 (having tried the preview) unless the final version can be configured to appear with the simplicity of Windows 7. I won't be using a tablet or a touch screen for my office.

I will definitely be putting Windows 8 on my desktop (and on my tablet and laptop). There are other benefits that outweigh the learning curve/workflow changes necessary for the interface changes. To each his/her own I guess...

Yes! Back to the game. Same as WinXP like Home Premium and Pro.

On the bad part. And now there seems to be more restricted features from older OSes which should be available as default (Remote Desktop). The good side of it, that those features are more for the pro-consumer so yeah, they did right. Finally getting an ultimate version seems really worth it.

Jose_49 said,

On the bad part. And now there seems to be more restricted features from older OSes which should be available as default (Remote Desktop).

That's not new. The home editions never included Remote Desktop server, just client.

rfirth said,

That's not new. The home editions never included Remote Desktop server, just client.

My bad then. Learned something new XD

Jose_49 said,
Yes! Back to the game. Same as WinXP like Home Premium and Pro.

On the bad part. And now there seems to be more restricted features from older OSes which should be available as default (Remote Desktop). The good side of it, that those features are more for the pro-consumer so yeah, they did right. Finally getting an ultimate version seems really worth it.

Wait, back to XP that had Home, Pro, x64, Media Center(of which there were three editions, the original, 2004 and 2005) and Tablet PC editions?

/Also embedded, which had sub editions like Embbeded POSready (for point of sale machines)
//IIRC the first Starter SKU was also under Windows XP
///And the N editions, and the ULCPC editions
////Let's also not forget the Windows XP 64 bit, not to be confused with the x64 edition, this one was made to run on Itanium CPUs, which are not compatible with IA-32 CPUs (IE x86)

IMPORTANT INFO ABOUT MEDIA CENTER;

According to Microsoft, this is what is going to happen with Media Center.

"Windows Media Center will be available as an economical “media pack” add-on to Windows 8 Pro. If you are an enthusiast or you want to use your PC in a business environment, you will want Windows 8 Pro."

Enron said,
I'm waiting for Ultimate. Hopefully a limited edition autographed by Ballmer.
It isn't Ultimate if there isn't an autograph! Which means my Ultimate copies are junk for WinVista and Win7.

zeke009 said,
It isn't Ultimate if there isn't an autograph! Which means my Ultimate copies are junk for WinVista and Win7.

At least my Windows 7 is legitimate then!

Fiannly... high time! Does this mean they'll undo their Windows 7 Home Premium con of not making Backup over a network available as it was in Vista!?

wotsit said,
Fiannly... high time! Does this mean they'll undo their Windows 7 Home Premium con of not making Backup over a network available as it was in Vista!?
I agree, any version of Windows should be able to backup to a network location. This should not be restricted like it is today.

wotsit said,
Fiannly... high time! Does this mean they'll undo their Windows 7 Home Premium con of not making Backup over a network available as it was in Vista!?

Agree 100% - it is completely ridiculous to remove network backups from the consumer version(s). Network drives are sold as "plug and play" now so no version should have this backup feature crippled.

zeke009 said,
I agree, any version of Windows should be able to backup to a network location. This should not be restricted like it is today.

So your grandma knows what a NAS is, and how to back up her Win 8 HOME copy to it nightly? Most people who run home are going to be computer illiterate, and can barely protect themselves from viruses/phising/trojans, now you want them to figure out how to back up to a network location?

Pro for me again.
Why can't they just put remote desktop single user into home.

Give pro ability to two users logged on, and server if you need more.

torrentthief said,
what does RT stand for?

I believe they've called it Windows RT after WinRT, which is the development platform for Metro apps. The RT stands for 'runtime'

cmc482 said,
So they killed off media center??? Or did I just miss it???

What makes you think that? Yes, the forgot it in this list. However, they already confirmed that Media Center isn't going away.

cmc482 said,
So they killed off media center??? Or did I just miss it???

I would hope they killed it and moved the necessary bits for terrestrial broadcast, cable and sattelite to libraries available to both win32 and WinRT.

cmc482 said,
So they killed off media center??? Or did I just miss it???

Whoops, perhaps i we read the article....

"Windows Media Center will be available as an economical “media pack” add-on to Windows 8 Pro."

cmc482 said,
So they killed off media center??? Or did I just miss it???

Can ANYBODY explain to me why people get so worked up over WMC in Windows 8? It's like they're completely oblivious to the fact that the Metro interface of the Start Screen is just as HTPC-friendly as an Xbox 360, and significantly more versatile than the bland old WMC system?

It has video players, picture viewers, a whole app market to grow forward, a solid notification system, and there's no reason why there can't just be a high quality metro DVR/TV-tuner application built on top of it for the comically tiny percentage of people who think they're a market worth targeting.

Joshie said,

Can ANYBODY explain to me why people get so worked up over WMC in Windows 8? It's like they're completely oblivious to the fact that the Metro interface of the Start Screen is just as HTPC-friendly as an Xbox 360, and significantly more versatile than the bland old WMC system?

It has video players, picture viewers, a whole app market to grow forward, a solid notification system, and there's no reason why there can't just be a high quality metro DVR/TV-tuner application built on top of it for the comically tiny percentage of people who think they're a market worth targeting.


I agree - but I still need that DVR/TV-tuner application and channel guide program to be written.

Joshie said,
there's no reason why there can't just be a high quality metro DVR/TV-tuner application built on top of it for the comically tiny percentage of people who think they're a market worth targeting.

Actually there is a great reason.
DVR means scheduling.
Background agents work on a particular schedule, not necessarily when your shows are airing.

It's about time they went back to just standard and pro versions for desktop/laptop users.
No more Starter, no more Home Basic/Premium, no more Enterprise, no more Ultimate.

I can't understand why MS had to have all these different tiered versions in the first place.

DJGM said,
...

Don't count starter out yet.
It may still be around for emerging markets with tense political situations where its artificially reduced featureset will prevent users from taking over the world.

DJGM said,
It's about time they went back to just standard and pro versions for desktop/laptop users.
No more Starter, no more Home Basic/Premium, no more Enterprise, no more Ultimate.

I can't understand why MS had to have all these different tiered versions in the first place.


Enterprise edition still exists!

DJGM said,
It's about time they went back to just standard and pro versions for desktop/laptop users.
No more Starter, no more Home Basic/Premium, no more Enterprise, no more Ultimate.

I can't understand why MS had to have all these different tiered versions in the first place.

Just you wait - you'll see the EU start whining about something and then we have another three editions specially for European customers.

I thought it would've been a bad move to go with a different name. Windows 8 just makes sense since it's the successor to Windows 7.

Windows 8 probably won't be my operating system of choice, yet I am very happy with this naming system. Finally!

Edited by Calum, Apr 16 2012, 11:49pm :

Calum said,
Windows 8 probably won't be my operating system of choice, yet I am very happy with this naming system. Finally!

Finally, a reduced number of editions…!

Calum said,
Windows 8 probably won't be my operating system of choice, yet I am very happy with this naming system. Finally!

Yep, great they reduced the number of editions!

But I won't use it either since the Metro mode on my desktop PC hasn't increased my productivity one bit.

Calum said,
Windows 8 probably won't be my operating system of choice, yet I am very happy with this naming system. Finally!

Wait what? When did it happen that you don't like Windows 8?

MFH said,

Wait what? When did it happen that you don't like Windows 8?

After having used the Consumer Preview for a bit

I still like where Microsoft are going with the Metro experience, in terms of the feel (animations, specifically), but the look has started to grate on me, especially the look of the Start Screen.

Further, I'd prefer to use just one experience (Desktop or Metro), not two, and it's clear that won't be possible (at least not yet) for a number of reasons.

I am starting to see exactly what some of you who are against Windows 8 are referring to; however, I am still curious to see where the Metro experience goes in the future. The other day, I was using the Visual Studio 11 Beta to develop some of this HTA I'm working on, and I didn't like being kicked out of the Desktop experience when I wanted to view an image that was related to the work.

I'm thinking of getting a Mac, at least until the Metro experience has matured, if it matures well at all.

I definitely spoke way too soon in my defence of Windows 8, so I owe you and others an apology for jumping the gun and naively thinking I was so sure.

I'll keep trying it out until that and Mountain Lion are both released, then I'll make my decision.

Edited by Calum, Apr 17 2012, 8:20am :

fobban said,

Yep, great they reduced the number of editions!

But I won't use it either since the Metro mode on my desktop PC hasn't increased my productivity one bit.


Would you say it's hindered your productivity, though, or has your productivity stayed around the same? I'm genuinely interested, as I haven't really tried to do anything productive with it yet.

Calum said,
I definitely spoke way too soon in my defence of Windows 8, so I owe you and others an apology for jumping the gun and naively thinking I was so sure.

You don't owe anybody an apology. Metro as a lot going for it. I did not try it on a tablet but i'm 100% sure it will be a great tableat OS. I'm definately looking forward to Windows 8 tablets.

I think it might make a great casual home OS too for tech illiterates once they are used to it and all home apps have a metro version. I personally prefer to do everyday tasks on a tablet OS. Not only because tablets are portable and you don't have to turn them off but also because the OS is really simple to use. I think simple, repetitive and short tasks like checking the weather can be done faster on a tablet.

I see why MS wants to merge the desktop and tablet experience. Apple sorta wants to do the same too. It's perfectly logical and it makes sens.

My problem with Windows 8 is the same as your. And i think it's a problem all power users and people working on a workstation will have. There's no way to force the desktop mode right now (anyway last time i tested Windows 8 for my cie was a while ago). Not all apps need to be metro. I don't see the point of a metro version of Visual Basic or Eclipse or a metro version of Adobe Creative Suite.

I think the relation between the desktop and start screen of the Pro version of Windows 8 should sorta work like Windows 7 and Media Center. By default Windows 8 Pro should always be in desktop mode. Metro only apps should appear in a windows (metro emulation in a window with a button to full screen it). And user should ahve the option to make Windows 8 Pro works like Windows 8 normal.

It's not that Windows 8 hinder my productivity. I personally just find Metro unpleasant to work with. I don't mind it when casually using my PC.

Edited by LaP, Apr 17 2012, 5:31pm :

LaP said,

You don't owe anybody an apology. Metro as a lot going for it. I did not try it on a tablet but i'm 100% sure it will be a great tableat OS. I'm definately looking forward to Windows 8 tablets.

I think it might make a great casual home OS too for tech illiterates once they are used to it and all home apps have a metro version.

I highly doubt that tech illiterates will like or take to it.

I've gone to a rather sizable chunk of my clients already who I know are still running XP or Vista, and gave them a laptop with the CP installed on it.

These are people who predominately are smartphone/tablet users already. They are in that tech illiterate range of just knowing how to surf the web, play Farmville, do simple spreadsheets, use the one or two apps that I've trained them to use, etc,etc, etc. Plus of course, they pay me to do their IT work on a very consistent basis, which most tech literate people wouldn't do as they rarely if ever need an IT person for basic PC needs.

To say that the acceptance of Windows 8 has been underwhelming would be a stretch of the truth.

The order of PCs that I have coming in is rather large, and I can count the number of client expressing interest in Win8 on one hand. I already have enough work, that I've decided to get some newer and bigger storage servers to store my clients images on, and I've had to pull in some of my part time helpers in on a more full-time basis to help with the workload.

Mind you that I still haven't even talked to around 75% of my client list who I know are still running XP and Vista, as I already have enough work from people running for the hills after using Win8 for at least a couple of days on a preview basis.

I think the idea and notion that, "hey smartphones and tablet usage is taking off, so we must make the PC experience more like the smartphone/table experience" is missing a ton of points about what the PC experience is about and for.

That has been my experience with my clientele, in that many of them utilize their smart-phones and tablets for simple functions throughout their lives and businesses. But overwhelmingly at some point, they retire to their offices and their PCs to do PC tasks. Their comment regarding WIN8 is that their lives are so busy that even at home they don't want to be bothered learning this new <insert cuss words> computer (referring to the WIN8 OS), and worry that they can't get in touch with me or someone else to show them how to do simple things when they forget the new hard way to do something that was so simple before (paraphrasing them, even though I may personally disagree with them with some of the issues they reference to).

I know this is getting long winded, but I know a lot of people have trouble even after having used tablets and such with the methods of closing apps. This goes back to the fact that they are using keyboards and mice and not touch screens (and that is a personal gripe that I have after having used a touch screen monitor for awhile myself). I can stand behind them and remind them for over 15 mins that you press and hold the button and drag down, or utilize my favorite and easy Alt-F4 method, but it always happens that they will forget rather soon and cuss up a storm about why the red X is missing over and over again.

Since I mentioned it, has anyone tried touch screen monitors for an extended period of time at a desktop? Ugh, and I though my carpal was bad. For the life of me, I could never ever get comfortable. If I brought the monitor close in enough to make touching the screen comfortable, my eyes would hurt unbearably at the end of the day. Plus the keyboard would be too close making my shoulders hurt and I could never type right. If I moved the monitor back, then my shoulders would ache at the end of the day with the constant reaching and outstretched motions.

Anyways, my prediction is that Windows 9 will look more like Windows 7, and Metro will continue on if at in a Windows Mobile OS edition. And that's just not me speaking, but my tech illiterate clients speaking too.

Dot Matrix said,
"Windows RT" should be "Windows 8 RT" to avoid confusion, but wow, I'm impressed by this!

Calling it Windows 8 would have people wondering why it doesn't run Windows 8 programs.

Dot Matrix said,
"Windows RT" should be "Windows 8 RT" to avoid confusion, but wow, I'm impressed by this!

It's not a problem since you won't be able to actually buy a Windows RT copy on a DVD or something. The only way to get this version of Windows 8 is with a new device, tablet etc. Like the enterprise version, this won't hit retail in any form.

Farchord said,
Really? No Windows Media Player on the ARM version? Who's idea was that?

they have pictures and video apps for specific files. it makes total sense.

Farchord said,
Really? No Windows Media Player on the ARM version? Who's idea was that?

WMP is a desktop only app. As there's no desktop, ARM will have Music and Videos metro apps for that purpose.

chAos972 said,

WMP is a desktop only app. As there's no desktop, ARM will have Music and Videos metro apps for that purpose.

just for the heads up, ARM does have a desktop

Farchord said,
Really? No Windows Media Player on the ARM version? Who's idea was that?

The App is redundant on an ARM device, as the main functionality of Media Player would not ever be used on an ARM device. (For example CD ripping.)

The OS already provides integrated Music and Video library and managing capabilities that Media Player was previously needed.

Think WP7, have you missed Media Player on it? Nope... And it has more audio/video functionality than Media Player on the desktop.

Farchord said,
Really? No Windows Media Player on the ARM version? Who's idea was that?

Windows RT should be renamed "Apollo" or something similar. Windows RT is not consumer friendly. Non-tech savvy consumers will be confused by this.

calimike said,
Windows RT should be renamed "Apollo" or something similar. Windows RT is not consumer friendly. Non-tech savvy consumers will be confused by this.
Unlikely, because it's not a store version of Windows. How would calling it after the codename for the next version of Windows Phone be in any way helpful?

chAos972 said,

WMP is a desktop only app. As there's no desktop, ARM will have Music and Videos metro apps for that purpose.


Yes there is a desktop. Just limited. It will be running Windows Explorer and the touch-friendly desktop version of Office 15.

dafin0 said,

just for the heads up, ARM does have a desktop

And right now the only desktop apps that will run on it are the tweaked versions of Office 15. Just because the desktop is there for ARM doesn't mean your x86/64 desktop apps will somehow run.

GP007 said,

And right now the only desktop apps that will run on it are the tweaked versions of Office 15. Just because the desktop is there for ARM doesn't mean your x86/64 desktop apps will somehow run.

The complaint is that WMP wasn't ported to ARM.

Josh the Nerd said,

The complaint is that WMP wasn't ported to ARM.

Sure, probably because they don't have the time to port all of what WMP is over to WinRT in time? Honestly, who knows how long it'd take to port from Win32 to WinRT anyways? Sure it's a media player but it's packed full of stuff so who knows?