Windows Phone growth continues with December 2013 reaching new heights

It’s no secret that Microsoft’s Windows Phone platform got off to a much slower start than many had hoped. But with a couple years now behind the platform, there is solid proof that Windows Phone is growing and that Microsoft's marketing efforts are paying off.

Aside from the notable achievements, and we call them achievements because getting developers to adopt to your new platform is never an easy task, especially landing key first party apps such as Instagram, Facebook and Twitter; trending analysis shows consumers are warming up to the platform. How do we know consumers are looking into the platform? That’s easy, Google Trends.

If you wonder why Google Trends is an important indicator of market acknowledgement of a platform, it’s because Google has a commanding lead of all Internet based searches.  Because Google is able to gather such a wide base of search queries, it can be used as a representative sample of the market, and when we start to look into Windows Phone, the data paints a positive picture.

If we start with the macro, you are able to see the obvious trend. The growth of Windows Phone based searches is growing steadily and this is exactly what you would expect to see. But, there are instances of new products (from old companies) falling away after being on the market for several years (such as Blackberry) so the fact that Windows Phone exhibits such a solid climb at the macro level, is a good sign for Microsoft.

When you start to close in on the micro, the trending is still apparent, although not as significant when you take a look at the entire picture. Over the last two years, interest in Windows Phone, based on Google search trends, has continued to climb at a moderate pace. While not the ‘hockey stick’ style growth that many would love to see, it’s still progressive and consistent growth.

One of the key takeaways here too is that Windows Phone saw its highest level of interest in December of 2013. Specifically, the week of Christmas Windows Phone hit its peak since the platform has been introduced. This is significant for many reasons, one of which means that they had a very strong holiday shipping season.  Secondly is that their holiday marketing efforts likely paid off. While we have to wait another week or so to hear the official earnings from Nokia and Microsoft, we suspect that Nokia will acknowledge another strong quarter of sales.

Finally, when we look at the trailing 12 months, we can see that Windows Phone is still on the rise, the growth is not substantial but it's consistent, which is key for Microsoft.

Why is it key? Well, at this point the company’s internal expectations are that it’s going to be a long road to a significant marketshare position and not an overnight explosion of growth. Seeing that Windows Phone is still trending upward, even at the micro level, is a good sign for the platform.

You might be thinking that this slow growth is not all that impressive. But remember, the smartphone market is one of the most saturated markets on the planet. With several strong platforms and the fact that Microsoft is playing catch-up, they are showing that they do have the muscle to be relevant in any market that they enter.

If you need evidence that this market is insanely competitive and that getting consumers (and developers to switch platforms) is quite hard, take a look at webOS or even BBOS. With webOS completely dead and BBOS struggling to remain relevant, the smartphone market is not one for the weak and with Microsoft showing consistent growth over the macro picture, it’s certainly a good sign for the company.  Both of the companies backing webOS and BBOS had significant cash pools to support the platforms, but in this case you need a lot more than money to have a consumer-adored smartphone OS.

So what does all of this mean? It means that Windows Phone is gaining consumer acknowledgement, it’s becoming part of their vocabulary when they discuss smartphone platforms, and that is a huge win for Microsoft. We still continue to hear about poor sales experience from around the US about smartphone sales folks steering consumers away from Windows Phone, but when the consumer starts asking for a Microsoft platform in a market that they were lagging for many years, it’s a win by any measure.

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Why are you using "windows phone" as the keyword?

I don't think people search for "windows phone" or "android" when they are shopping for a new device. I think they search for "Galaxy" or "Lumia."

"Lumia" has a much steeper climb than "windows phone" on google trends.

Not that it means much of anything. People could be searching for "windows phone," and not buying them, based on what they found on the net. It's a pretty weak correlation between google searches and sales.

Sloppy journalism at its worst: Where are the numbers? Not in the text, and ALL the graphs are missing the vertical scale, which renders them useless. A journalist who doesn't know this simple fact should never report on anything related to statistics.

Ill be convinced that Windows Phone is really going somewhere when flagship phones make a difference in any country, particularly countries that matter like the US and China, till then Windows Phone is the new low end cheap disposable phone and thats OK, at least they have a niche they can claim to be all theirs.

Why does Europe not matter?

It looks as if the US is a strange market. The iPhone does exceptionally well, and Windows Phone exceptionally poorly. In most of the world, Windows Phone is breaking the 10% barrier - probably in part because of the strength of the Nokia brand in Europe and the cost of the handsets everywhere else.

What's so great about expensive phones, anyway? Just as with any other technology you might care to name (desktops, laptops, televisions), they start out as high end luxuries and then end up as essentials for everyone, regardless of income. Apple will either learn to compete with Android and Windows Phone in low-cost devices or be relegated to a niche, as Apple was for many years in desktops.

The market share champion won't be the company that keeps developing "flagship" devices, but the one that sells more units to business and low end consumer, where the most bodies are. That's how Microsoft came to dominate the PC market years ago. It won't necessarily play out the same way this time (Android has too much of a lead), but looking at smartphones as upper end products is probably the wrong lens.

Windows Phone is growing and that's good. But they also need growth in the high end devices market. There simply aren't any high end WP devices that manufacturers are boasting about. Most of iOS is high end, high profit. Most of android is low end but the galaxy line is doing great and has a very high profit.

The correlation between people that spend lots of money on phones and ones that do on apps cannot be ignored. iOS is proof of that. The vast majority of a successful ecosystem shouldn't be filled with low end devices. People that get "free" or "sub $100" cell phones probably won't pay $9.99 or even $4.99 on games or apps. And developers know about this.

stevan said,
Windows Phone is growing and that's good. But they also need growth in the high end devices market. There simply aren't any high end WP devices that manufacturers are boasting about. Most of iOS is high end, high profit. Most of android is low end but the galaxy line is doing great and has a very high profit.

The correlation between people that spend lots of money on phones and ones that do on apps cannot be ignored. iOS is proof of that. The vast majority of a successful ecosystem shouldn't be filled with low end devices. People that get "free" or "sub $100" cell phones probably won't pay $9.99 or even $4.99 on games or apps. And developers know about this.

Totally agree.

stevan said,
Windows Phone is growing and that's good. But they also need growth in the high end devices market. There simply aren't any high end WP devices that manufacturers are boasting about. Most of iOS is high end, high profit. Most of android is low end but the galaxy line is doing great and has a very high profit.

The correlation between people that spend lots of money on phones and ones that do on apps cannot be ignored. iOS is proof of that. The vast majority of a successful ecosystem shouldn't be filled with low end devices. People that get "free" or "sub $100" cell phones probably won't pay $9.99 or even $4.99 on games or apps. And developers know about this.

If I a missing your definition of 'high end' or your point, I apologize in advanced.

The Nokia 1520 or the Nokia 1020 are not high end?

These are two devices that have features that cannot be found in the iPhone or Android world, and easily best the 'high end' iPhone 5s and Android devices.


As for the point about developer interest based on sales, it has less to do with higher end device sales than one might assume.

Publishers are getting better return rates out of WP users because of things like the Try/Buy model Microsoft encourages. There are other advantages of the WP store for developers, like the ability to do in App purchasing without giving a cut to Apple, and control of the Store so that copy cat software doesn't appear almost overnight due to the way packages are handled on Android.

It is a good time for developers, as they can easily make a name for themselves that would often get lost in the Android/iOS world. It helps that development on WP is also insanely easy compared to iOS or Android.


Where WP is not doing well is specifically in the USA because of the extra large iPhone presence, which has changed a lot in the past year. Developers that were only doing iOS just a year ago are almost all doing Android versions and also now going the additional step to be cross platform and offer WP versions - especially as WP8 made porting far easier and has only just started in terms of development cycles.

There has been a lot of movement in common engine/code base development that also runs on WP8 in the last year, that just started to show up in release titles in the last 2-3 months.

(Notice that most game engines are now on WP8 and publishers are dropping bigger name releases on WP usually in the same timeframe. - There is also a new wave of WP8 game releases because of the new engines where titles previously available on iOS or Android are now being released for WP rather quickly.)

Mobius Enigma said,

If I a missing your definition of 'high end' or your point, I apologize in advanced.

The Nokia 1520 or the Nokia 1020 are not high end?

These are two devices that have features that cannot be found in the iPhone or Android world, and easily best the 'high end' iPhone 5s and Android devices.

Absolutely, I didn't say they don't have any high end devices, it's just that you don't really hear about their sales numbers. The point I was making is that the vast majority of WP growth is from lower end devices. You don't hear Nokia saying how they sold millions of the high end devices, the ones where the real profit lies.

Developers can and will develop for every platform, it's how you maximize your profits. But the point being is that people that buy lower end devices won't spend much on software that's available to them.

I believe that WP will gain major traction when it and W8.1/9 RT are merged into one OS with one app store. WP market share suffers largely because of public perception of the OS, and it will take such a major change to shift public perception. Of course, I have been wrong before!

First it was Mango, then Tango then Windows Phone 8 that people said would make a difference, now you are saying W8.1/9 RT, OMG! You must be joking! You are the most optimistic person that I have ever come across on the internet.

derekaw said,
First it was Mango, then Tango then Windows Phone 8 that people said would make a difference, now you are saying W8.1/9 RT, OMG! You must be joking! You are the most optimistic person that I have ever come across on the internet.

you'd be right if it wasn't for the fact that those updates DID make a difference. Market share has been increasing, constantly, while those updates occurred.

you seem to miss this point though through blind fanboyism based hate, good luck with that.

I would suggest strongly that normal people are not buying Windows Phone based on an update. That would mean knowing about the various updates. Sure WP's are selling but there has been no update that has led the platform to take off.

Normal people, people who don't read tech blogs, uninformed people, the masses, are hardly going to be swayed into buying a future Windows Phone because there is now just one app store or a notification centre. Mrs Jones down the road is not going to say 'Just the one app store now! Great, I'll take that Windows Phone' They don't even know what that means.

I just made the switch from an iPhone 4S to a Lumia 1520. So far I am absolutely loving it, especially the screen. IOS is good, but Apple lost my business because they refuse to increase the size of the screen. If they had a 5" option with a proper aspect ratio I may have stayed with them, but I also really like the idea of Windows Phone and now that I have one I'm finding that it really isn't behind anymore as far as app availability. I've been able to find every app I have searched for so far. The only gripe I have right now is that I'm really having problems with the camera. I know that Nokia's cameras are supposed to be the best on a smartphone right now, but if there is any movement in what I'm trying to take a picture of and I don't have the flash on they come out blurry as heck. It doesn't matter if I use auto settings or manually customize the shot, so that is quite annoying. The iPhone is a lit easier to take quick pictures on.

Stokkolm said,
I just made the switch from an iPhone 4S to a Lumia 1520. So far I am absolutely loving it, especially the screen. IOS is good, but Apple lost my business because they refuse to increase the size of the screen. If they had a 5" option with a proper aspect ratio I may have stayed with them, but I also really like the idea of Windows Phone and now that I have one I'm finding that it really isn't behind anymore as far as app availability. I've been able to find every app I have searched for so far. The only gripe I have right now is that I'm really having problems with the camera. I know that Nokia's cameras are supposed to be the best on a smartphone right now, but if there is any movement in what I'm trying to take a picture of and I don't have the flash on they come out blurry as heck. It doesn't matter if I use auto settings or manually customize the shot, so that is quite annoying. The iPhone is a lit easier to take quick pictures on.
You'll be back! Especially if the rumored "bigger" iPhone is coming this year. I used a Samsung Focus for 2 years and then upgraded to the Lumia 920 in December 2012. I tried, but the novelty died. Today I'm back to my iPhone 5s and Galaxy Note 3.

JHBrown said,
You'll be back! Especially if the rumored "bigger" iPhone is coming this year. I used a Samsung Focus for 2 years and then upgraded to the Lumia 920 in December 2012. I tried, but the novelty died. Today I'm back to my iPhone 5s and Galaxy Note 3.

I doubt it, I never liked my iPhone as much as I do this Lumia 1520.

Stokkolm said,

I doubt it, I never liked my iPhone as much as I do this Lumia 1520.
Interesting. I may give it chance again one day.

Stokkolm said,
I just made the switch from an iPhone 4S to a Lumia 1520. So far I am absolutely loving it, especially the screen. IOS is good, but Apple lost my business because they refuse to increase the size of the screen. If they had a 5" option with a proper aspect ratio I may have stayed with them, but I also really like the idea of Windows Phone and now that I have one I'm finding that it really isn't behind anymore as far as app availability. I've been able to find every app I have searched for so far. The only gripe I have right now is that I'm really having problems with the camera. I know that Nokia's cameras are supposed to be the best on a smartphone right now, but if there is any movement in what I'm trying to take a picture of and I don't have the flash on they come out blurry as heck. It doesn't matter if I use auto settings or manually customize the shot, so that is quite annoying. The iPhone is a lit easier to take quick pictures on.

I'm not aware of the motion issue you are noticing, but I haven't played with the 1520 for more than a few minutes either.

Try both the WP Camera App and the Nokia Camera App. See if one gives you a better 'automatic' image. Also maybe find the setting in the Nokia Camera App that corrects what you are seeing.

Considering the imaging of the 1520 is considerably higher and better in low light, it should be less blurry than the iPhone. (I know this is a fact with the Nokia 925/928/1020 compared to the 5/5s.)

With the Nokia Camera App you have access to settings that you don't normally find on a Phone.
(You also don't need the Nokia 1020 for brilliant pictures, my main personal phone is a Nokia 928 with 8mp and to my own amazement, it can best my 15mp DSLR at times.)

Check out the Nokia tutorial for their Camera App online.

I love my WP, but who gives a rats about how many news articles there are about it. The sales figures are the ONLY figures which matter.

Nashy said,
I love my WP, but who gives a rats about how many news articles there are about it. The sales figures are the ONLY figures which matter.

Sales figures are the result. But Microsoft won't share them. The actual figures won't compare well with iOS and Android. At least not for years to come. Microsoft isn't going to kill WP by sharing that info. So we'll have to do with performance indicators such as this.

Nashy said,
I love my WP, but who gives a rats about how many news articles there are about it. The sales figures are the ONLY figures which matter.

Trend/Buzz is far more important than actual sales. Ask Apple.

As I mentioned before, confusing sales and market share with other things is often inaccurate.

There is a common trending model that is based on news about a product that doesn't distinguish between good news or bad news to determine the long term success of a product.

There also exists a variation of this model that measures the emotive response by competitors and their customers/fans and is quite accurate. It is based on how much it angers and is dismissed by competitors and their fans. The model is complex but is based on what is seen as a true threat and is compiled with the buzz in the news created by the perceived threat. (Like an animal sounding an alarm to the pack when it sees a predator.)

Even here on Neowin, the more 'passionate' negative responses you get about a products, like 'WP sucks', 'WP is dead', the better it is probably doing or will do in a longer cycle. Posts like, "I like it, but I won't buy it because it lacks features XYZ." can mean the doom for products - which is how BB10 was received.


The past 12 months looks like WP has flatlined more less...At the local shopping center yesterday I browsed past a few carrier stores and only one store had a WP device out on display, it was an HTC 8s which is about a year and half old...I am in a major west coast city, seems the interest just isn't there for the WP in America.

Sonne said,
The past 12 months looks like WP has flatlined more less...At the local shopping center yesterday I browsed past a few carrier stores and only one store had a WP device out on display, it was an HTC 8s which is about a year and half old...I am in a major west coast city, seems the interest just isn't there for the WP in America.

It only looks like that if you can't read graphs.

Sonne said,
The past 12 months looks like WP has flatlined more less...At the local shopping center yesterday I browsed past a few carrier stores and only one store had a WP device out on display, it was an HTC 8s which is about a year and half old...I am in a major west coast city, seems the interest just isn't there for the WP in America.

Carrier 'stores' or private dealer 'kiosks' in a mall. There is quite a bit of difference, especially since I don't know of many actual carrier 'stores' located in a location like you are describing.

Independent retailers will carry the carrier signage and branding, but are not carrier stores.

You do realize that this image could be either a carrier store or a dealer store, there is usually no way to tell unless you pull up a list of the corporate store locations.

If it is a real carrier store, they have all models that are offered on their website. So if someone walked into a Verizon store that doesn't have the Nokia 928 or at least a demo/placement for the Nokia 928, it isn't a Verizon store.

I can show you two Verizon stores in a tiny town of 10,000 people, that carry full Verizon branding just like a corporate store, yet the closest actual 'Verizon' store is over 200 miles away.

This is where things get funny, as these stores are privately owned and operated with only a few even having an exclusivity contract.

As for the actual phones offered, they are 100% controlled by the owner, not the carrier. This also applies to the phone pricing and insurance contracts, as it is all set by the dealer, not the carrier.

In the Verizon store example above, they don't carry any WP devices. It is a quirk of the owner that is an Android fan and also owns stock in Apple. (The owner is an acquaintance of my brother.)

The time I was in the store, two customers asked about the new Windows Nokia phones and both were told they were crap. One customer was specifically told that the store would not offer them any Verizon support if they purchased a WP online or at another store.

Additionally, the customers do NOT realize this is a private store and think it is a real Verizon store, and the store does its best to never disclose this.


Like many dealer stores, they shove devices based on personal or financial biases. If they can get the phones cheaper, they will push them, which is why you see more crap phones than quality phones, as the dealers get the same amount on each signup no matter what type of phone the customer buys.


To follow market trends it is far more accurate to track online sales or multi-dealer stores like a best buy where there is less bias in what product is carried and customers get a choice.


PS Judging the 'quality' of a product based on market share is often wrong. McDonalds is huge, but their product quality if far from the 'best'.

Edited by Mobius Enigma, Jan 20 2014, 10:18am :

Well, with every release, WP7, 7.5 and 8, it growth realy fast as seen on the chart, Windows Phone 8.1 will do this probably as well.

Studio384 said,
Well, with every release, WP7, 7.5 and 8, it growth realy fast as seen on the chart, Windows Phone 8.1 will do this probably as well.

Indeed. Every update has seen an up tick for sure... Generally these updates see new devices and a marketing push too.

It needs a better notification center. Androids is pretty unmatched, in that, all go to one place. You dont have to scroll around looking for them on diff homescreens like iOS or up and down like WP.

Beyond Godlike said,
It needs a better notification center. Androids is pretty unmatched, in that, all go to one place. You dont have to scroll around looking for them on diff homescreens like iOS or up and down like WP.

True. I think the left side of WP's startscreen (and aobve W8's startscreen) would be great places for it.

Beyond Godlike said,
It needs a better notification center. Androids is pretty unmatched, in that, all go to one place. You dont have to scroll around looking for them on diff homescreens like iOS or up and down like WP.

I agree WP8 does need a notification center now.

The problem is adapting existing App models to WP8 to mimic how they work on Android and iOS rather than embrace a more purist set of notifications that work with Live tiles.

In theory the 'notification' center of WP are the Live Tiles on the screen, which if thought of in context as notifications could be showing more information instead of just a number to represent new information. This problem is increased with the introduction of the newer smaller tiles introduced in WP8 that only leaves enough room to have a number instead of actually showing the newest emails/messages, etc.

Beyond notifications, even in comparison to Android widgets, there is more information at a glance on WP without having to open several Apps to retrieve the information.

Even with the HTC and Samsung imitations of WP 'information' titles, WP is still the best phone to pick up and at a glance see key information that is relevant to the user based on what tiles they have visible.

The majority of the time, WP users turn on the screen to see their live tiles, and get the information they need without having to open anything. In contrast on Android we have some information and widgets scattered or dig through the notification screen, neither of which is as efficient or consistently designed to be easily readable.

Pay attention to people the next time you are in a meeting or at an event. You can spot the WP users that lights up the screen and turn it off, and the Android users that swipe around and slide open their notifications or the iOS users that pull open their notifications and then open several Apps to get their essential information.

Some people have too much apps for the live tile concept to work. For power-users an aggregated list of all notifications would work best. Microsoft accomendated such users by introducing the smaller tiles. But these users wont be satisfied until they have an notification centre.

While I wont use it most of the times I do think its nice to have the ability to check any toasts I've missed. Normally its clear that the toast you missed it related to the latest message you see on the live tile but sometimes its unclear. It would be nice to have sort of a live stream of updates to the left of the startscreen. Basically all the content that has appeared on live tiles in a list that you can easily filter.

Continuous growth is important as eventually they will hit critical mass. The point at which they are accepted by competitors and consumers as a vallid player. Then growth will really take off. 8.1 could be a massive change that will not only improve/change WP8 dramatically but will also put it more in line with Windows 8. They could be a gamechanger for Microsoft.

derekaw said,
And we all know how well Windows 8 is doing, thats a great move!

Microsoft mistake was slapping an touch UI on non-touch devices without an option to change UI elements to accomendate non-touch users. However Windows 8 is well received by those who use it on a touch device.

Microsoft was incredibly foolish but Windows 8 is happening and the new touch-friendly UI is the future. Btw, have you tried it? Some of its gestures is something WP8 could benefit from. In fact iOS7 already copied it as well.

Shadowzz said,
I dont have a touch UI on my Windows 8(.1). Works perfectly fine with a keyboard and mouse.

It works but are you really telling me having to swipe your mouse to the right corner side of the screen and then pull down/up to open a huge icon bar is the perfect UI for a non-touch device? The charm bar is a great tool for touch. Easy to access and large enough to press. But it's clearly not designed for non-touch. It looks comical on a 22'' monitor.

I can fully understand how Windows 8 can be experienced as an annoying and needlessly complex experience if someone never experienced it on a touch device. And the charmbar is just one example. The same goes for the rest of the UI.

Yes it is, cause I've been using my taskbar like that since I can remember.

I am very happy I now have a ribbon UI instead of a cluster of drop-down menu's.

I can FINALLY do almost everything with my mouse, finally mouse-gestures are intergrated into the OS instead of being forced to use my keyboard for simple things just because its faster and easier. Now I can continue to use my mouse.

Also great that I don't have to point at little boxes for closing, minimizing or other junk, but can just drag and drop the application to suit my needs. (Windows 7 gave us winkey+arrow keys and other handy features, Windows 8 gave us even more)

Also I for one am happy I do not have to use a start menu anymore. Even in the days of Windows 95 and 98, the start menu was a big giant mess. Several rows of software/games/others hidden in a infinite structure of folders under either its own name, a company name or some other name.
Windows 7 degraded the entire start menu into an advanced search box.

Now I have a grid of interactive icons, kinda like the active desktop MS removed in Win7, but vastly improved.


So again, Windows 8 is great for non-touch usage, better then any previous Windows or any other OS available.

(I am also using a 22 inch monitor)

We'll have to see where it goes in 2014 but there's no question that 2013 was a solid growth year for the platform. If/when 8.1 comes out and adds in all the features people have been asking for plus other key improvements mixed with a good dose of new devices should see more gains in the year.

George P said,
We'll have to see where it goes in 2014 but there's no question that 2013 was a solid growth year for the platform. If/when 8.1 comes out and adds in all the features people have been asking for plus other key improvements mixed with a good dose of new devices should see more gains in the year.

i think so, its growing now and adding some key features is only going to help. Some key features will allow businesses to make the jump (some are waiting for the enterprise pack), others will appease people that want things like the notification center, and cortana is shaping up to be a great addition.

add new hardware and i can only see more adoption and recognition for the platform.

duddit2 said,

i think so, its growing now and adding some key features is only going to help. Some key features will allow businesses to make the jump (some are waiting for the enterprise pack), others will appease people that want things like the notification center, and cortana is shaping up to be a great addition.

add new hardware and i can only see more adoption and recognition for the platform.


Agreed. The Enterprise Pack in particular cannot come soon enough...

George P said,
We'll have to see where it goes in 2014 but there's no question that 2013 was a solid growth year for the platform. If/when 8.1 comes out and adds in all the features people have been asking for plus other key improvements mixed with a good dose of new devices should see more gains in the year.

WP 8.1 will indeed be a crucial point: if MS will deliver the platform will be able to go against its real competitor: Android.

They need to do a better job of getting in-store associates (AT&T, Verizon, T-Mobile) to push the phones. When you have a situation (like we do) where associates are actively steering people away from your products, that's a HUGE problem.

How do they fix that? I don't know. But Microsoft needs to figure it out.

cybersaurusrex said,
They need to do a better job of getting in-store associates (AT&T, Verizon, T-Mobile) to push the phones. When you have a situation (like we do) where associates are actively steering people away from your products, that's a HUGE problem.

How do they fix that? I don't know. But Microsoft needs to figure it out.


Unfortunately you can't beat the fanboy out of them.

The only fix is increased consumer demand, which we are seeing slowly but surely...

I think that's changing. Over a year ago the sales rep at AT&T seemed to be content with selling me a Lumia 920, even saying that it was a nice alternative to iPhone and Android.

Last week I switched to T-Mobile and got a Lumia 925, one of the sales reps there had one as his personal phone. Nobody attempted to get me two switch.

I think it just depends on where you go.

Lay-Z said,
I think that's changing. Over a year ago the sales rep at AT&T seemed to be content with selling me a Lumia 920, even saying that it was a nice alternative to iPhone and Android.

Last week I switched to T-Mobile and got a Lumia 925, one of the sales reps there had one as his personal phone. Nobody attempted to get me two switch.

I think it just depends on where you go.


They will almost always lean consumers towards the platform that they themselves use...

It's the worst kind of fanboyism. LOL

cybersaurusrex said,
They need to do a better job of getting in-store associates (AT&T, Verizon, T-Mobile) to push the phones. When you have a situation (like we do) where associates are actively steering people away from your products, that's a HUGE problem.

How do they fix that? I don't know. But Microsoft needs to figure it out.


I see what you saying but I don't agree thats the source of the problem. Some people want to buy windows phone and they go to store and buy it. some people have no clue what they want so sale associate will try to sell them something mainstream that most people use and love. MS in my opinion did a nice job technically on Windows Phone OS and I love WP Platform by the way; however, on consumer side and developer attraction they did a terrible job. Windows Phone came a little bit late in the game which was a bumper, but on the top of that instead of ease of adoption they created so many unnecessary restrictions for developers and Users in 7.x platform which they fixed partially on 8.x platform. They are software company but failed to create essential apps just like what Samsung did for galaxy line up and they are not software company. don't blame users, blame company. at the end they will eventually get it right at some point but def. not now.

when i was in usa in a verizon store i noticed the worker here explaining to some customer (45+ yrs old) something about windows phone and then she says something like "but the iphone is a lot easier to use"