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Explain (possible) network scenario?


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#1 cut

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    Neowinian

  • Joined: 28-August 12

Posted 18 September 2012 - 07:58

Out of pure curiosity, Im seeing a PC with this:

IP: 10.64.0.74
Submask: 255.255.255.0
Gateway: 10.64.0.2
DHCP Server: 10.8.112.97
DNS Servers:
10.8.112.97
10.69.0.17

What is the possible network scenario? First, this seem to be a huge network. I think there is a AD server (10.8.112.97) which gives a IP to a gateway in different deparments (well, it possible assigns it via static using the router's mac). Later the IP of each client on that gateway is statically assigned to make sure that deparment is on the same network at all times. Thanks to the AD server (which is also a DHCP/DNS server) it can possible access different networks still, thru routes set in the AD server.

Does this sound good or am I possibily way off?


#2 garethevans1986

garethevans1986

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Posted 18 September 2012 - 09:03

It's a large network.

I think you're confused over what a Active Directory Domain Controller does - routing isn't a feature of AD.

The gateway (10.64.0.2) will be a router.

GE

#3 OP cut

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    Neowinian

  • Joined: 28-August 12

Posted 18 September 2012 - 09:18

It's a large network.

I think you're confused over what a Active Directory Domain Controller does - routing isn't a feature of AD.

The gateway (10.64.0.2) will be a router.

GE

I thought you could.....would explain on how they have this setup. The only other way is to manually put in routes when setting up each router on a gateway but it seems far feteched

On a unrelated note, Im trying to simulate a segment of what I THINK is the network in Packet Tracer but for some reason, the server link wont come up. Thoughts?



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#4 d_hero

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Posted 18 September 2012 - 09:45

new to the forum, but been a lurker for years! Let's see if I can give this a bash:

Firstly, it's not necessarily a large network, theres not enough information to work that out. Although the PC uses a Class A IP Address, it uses a Class C Subnet so would only have a maximum of 254 hosts on that network segment. If we assume that the network segment with the server in and the network segment with the other DNS server also uses class c subnet, 10.8.112.0/24 and 10.69.0.17/24 then although its not a small network, its not a massive network either.

I would have thought that the PC would be connected possibly via a switch to a router. The Server would also be connected to the router and whatever 10.69.0.17 is would also be connected (All on different interfaces). There would be routes between all networks and a DHCP relay between 10.64.0.0/24 and 10.8.112.0/24.

Edit:

The above diagram that you have shown is a possible scenario, but in that scenario, the switch would have to be VLAN'd and unless it was a layer 3 switch, would be using a Router On A Stick configuration to route between the VLANs on the switch

#5 OP cut

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    Neowinian

  • Joined: 28-August 12

Posted 18 September 2012 - 10:09

new to the forum, but been a lurker for years! Let's see if I can give this a bash:

Firstly, it's not necessarily a large network, theres not enough information to work that out. Although the PC uses a Class A IP Address, it uses a Class C Subnet so would only have a maximum of 254 hosts on that network segment. If we assume that the network segment with the server in and the network segment with the other DNS server also uses class c subnet, 10.8.112.0/24 and 10.69.0.17/24 then although its not a small network, its not a massive network either.

I would have thought that the PC would be connected possibly via a switch to a router. The Server would also be connected to the router and whatever 10.69.0.17 is would also be connected (All on different interfaces). There would be routes between all networks and a DHCP relay between 10.64.0.0/24 and 10.8.112.0/24.

Edit:

The above diagram that you have shown is a possible scenario, but in that scenario, the switch would have to be VLAN'd and unless it was a layer 3 switch, would be using a Router On A Stick configuration to route between the VLANs on the switch

This is a possible scenario so you are correct there are alot more variables that can make it completely different.

I also had thoughts about a VLAN; Im going to further investigate the VLAN possibility.

Any idea why in PT the server link never goes up?

#6 d_hero

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Posted 18 September 2012 - 10:13

If you havent configured it with an ip address in the same subnet as the other PCs then I guess that could be it? What IPs have you assigned?

#7 OP cut

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    Neowinian

  • Joined: 28-August 12

Posted 18 September 2012 - 11:12

If you havent configured it with an ip address in the same subnet as the other PCs then I guess that could be it? What IPs have you assigned?

Is there a way to show text that hovers over each point to show the IP? This way I dont have to write it out in the future...

Yes all subnet masks are the same

#8 d_hero

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Posted 18 September 2012 - 13:08

yeah but are all IP addresses in the same subnet? 10.8.112.97 255.255.255.0 and 10.69.0.17 255.255.255.0 are not part of the same network even though they have the same subnet mask. therefore they cant communicate without a route between them. They would be if their subnet mask was, for example, 255.0.0.0

Is there a way to show text that hovers over each point to show the IP? This way I dont have to write it out in the future...


Im sorry Im not familiar with packet tracer

#9 +BudMan

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Posted 18 September 2012 - 13:08

Your server is not going to come up, because its on a different network. So you would either have to create a vlan on that switch to allow for that or connect it to the router and or switch connected to router with a different interface on router that is on that network.

As d_hero mentions, if we assume the other IPs give are also on /24 -- which is max of like 750 nodes, shoot it could be even smaller just because a /24 is used does not mean it anywhere close to full.. Might be only a couple of nodes on each segment.

Also in your drawing, I have to assume the 1 server is 10.8.112.97, where is the other one that is on 10.69.0.17

#10 sc302

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Posted 18 September 2012 - 13:19

you are on a large 10.x.x.x network. you have multiple vlans that redirect dhcp to the dhcp server on another segment. the switches more than likely do all of the routing, that is not to say the the server does not do the routing, it is just not probable.

#11 +BudMan

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Posted 18 September 2012 - 13:35

^ and what is large about at most from that output 3 segments? Just because they use 10 address space does not mean large, just because they are spread apart does not mean they large ;)

For all you know there is 1 client, and 2 servers - 1 switch and 1 router.. Shoot the switch might even be the router ;) You can not determine size from so little information.

#12 sc302

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Posted 18 September 2012 - 14:07

true, there is some assumption on my part, but I see 3 different network segments that are pretty well separated.

10.64.0
10.8.112.0
10.69.0

I can only assume that there are a few other network segments in there otherwise someone just picked some awfully random networks.

#13 +BudMan

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Posted 18 September 2012 - 15:30

People pick random **** all the time - for all we know this is some example out of book? They make up nonsense all the time ;)

And we are just guessing about /24 on those other networks, they could be much smaller. From the info given it could be 1 layer 3 switch with 1 PC and 2 servers. Shoot for all we know its 1 server with 2 interfaces in 2 different segments ;)

Sure it could also be a HUGE network with hundreds of segments as well - just hard to say from the little info given. I would not jump to large just from seeing 10 with disjointed address space. I use a 10 address for my vpn network - and even have a /24 on it, when its normally just my remote box and the vpn endpoint the only things in the segment. I use 10.0.200, which is random **** as well ;)

#14 d_hero

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Posted 19 September 2012 - 15:46

Yeah i think its more likely from the little info given that its actually a small network with "badly" chosen IP addresses. I say "Badly" because I currently use 10.0.1.0. 10.0.2.0, 10.0.3.0 etc all with 24 subnet bits as i find that range of ips easier to manage but I would be lost in a sea of hosts if i used a /8 subnet for example