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Posted

Windows Blue is Microsoft's future low-cost OS with yearly updates

Microsoft is busy preparing its next-generation Windows client, shortly after shipping Windows 8 in October. The Verge has learned from several sources familiar with Microsoft

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Posted

Rent an OS and updates?

Sounds pretty dire.

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Posted

I wonder what this means for licensing, specifically Volume License customers. I can see yearly KMS key updates becoming a real bitch lol

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Posted

what? surely this date is wrong. they are spending all this time and money to market Windows 8 and it will be replaced and then unsupported from an apps standpoint in 6 months?

Edit: no source for this info either.

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Posted

what? surely this date is wrong. they are spending all this time and money to market Windows 8 and it will be replaced and then unsupported from an apps standpoint in 6 months?

Edit: no source for this info either.

What I think the article is trying to say is they are going to start doing point releases like Windows 8.1, 8.2, 8.3, etc. Every few years they will do the major OS update like Windows 9. Rather than waiting 3 years for feature changes, they are going to do these point releases. Once a new point release is out though, you can't develop for an older version. Basically you have to develop against the latest SDK and that is it.

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Posted

Apple-ish indeed May as well go to hackintosh...

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Posted

No surprises there, they had stuff like this planned post-Windows XP, codenamed Blackcomb which was supposed to be a modular OS that you could purchase subscriptions to programs like office, etc.. before they scrapped it and went with Longhorn (Vista)

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Posted

theverge is a complete joke. they are just rehashing the rumors that have already been out for awhile.

-windows blue is an update that will make changes (duh)

-low cost or free

-updated API

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Posted

The approach is simple, Microsoft will price its next Windows release at a low cost or even free to ensure users upgrade.

So how do they make any profit by giving away their OS?

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Posted

You know we are approaching the end of the "personal" computing when news outlets start to refer to Windows as the " next-generation Windows client". At this point, I'm looking forward to use a more mature ReactOS project and a DOSBox build capable of running the older (pre-NT) Windows version with ease.

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You know we are approaching the end of the "personal" computing when news outlets start to refer to Windows as the " next-generation Windows client". At this point, I'm looking forward to use a more mature ReactOS project and a DOSBox build capable of running the older (pre-NT) Windows version with ease.

Why stop there when you could go all the way back to using an abacus and a slide-rule? Your posts are getting more and more ridiculous.

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You know we are approaching the end of the "personal" computing when news outlets start to refer to Windows as the " next-generation Windows client". At this point, I'm looking forward to use a more mature ReactOS project and a DOSBox build capable of running the older (pre-NT) Windows version with ease.

Just give me a Chromebook and I'm good to go.

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Posted

You know we are approaching the end of the "personal" computing when news outlets start to refer to Windows as the " next-generation Windows client". At this point, I'm looking forward to use a more mature ReactOS project and a DOSBox build capable of running the older (pre-NT) Windows version with ease.

Why are you even a reporter at a tech site, it seems you hate everything that's newer then the year 2000

You should find something better to do, because trolling these forums is getting boring for all of us!

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Posted

A chance to quickly address some W8 criticism

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Posted

So how do they make any profit by giving away their OS?

Metro. Why do you think it's a closed ecosystem?

To ensure they get money from every piece of software anyone uses.

The potential revenue from getting 20-30% for every single software anyone buys, plus advertising built into the platform plus native tie-in's to all of Microsoft's other platforms (Music, Xbox etc etc. to help ensure people go there first for all of their games, music, videos etc.).

It's effectively subsidizing the operating system through the software. Not radically dissimilar to how smart phones are subsidized by the contracted plans.

As long as people use Metro you can ensure they have to go through you for anything they want to buy, and you have complete control over what anyone can do on the OS. No software runs you don't explicitly approve of. Radically decreased piracy.

The potential profit margins there will vastly exceed anything OS licensing has ever brought in the past.

Apple has succeeded doing the exact same thing for years.

The downside to this is users that use the desktop which remains an open uncontrolled platform with no service tie-ins, no advertising, purchases from anywhere. That'll kill profits, but as long as they can get a sufficiently large number of people to primarily use Metro it'll work out. Moving more traditional desktop functionality like explorer/file browser to Metro and off the desktop will help there.

Even if some people primarily use the desktop it's not crippling, Android is an open OS too but they survive quite giving the OS out free and subsidizing it via software through Google Play... because most people don't use the open aspects and don't get software from anyone except Google even if they can so the lost revenue from those few that don't partake in GooglePlay or Google's various other services are covered by the majority who do.

I suppose removing the desktop obviates this issue, but that's obviously not viable for the foreseeable future.

In any case, OS licensing is a pittance compared to other new revenue sources through the OS.

If higher windows costs prevents people from buying and using Windows 8, that means fewer people in Metro. And anything that prevents people from accessing Metro is costing them money, as the alternative is the desktop on Win7.... which benefits Microsoft not at all, there is no profit margins from people using the desktop. Or competing platforms, be it Linux, iOS/OSX, Android.

They NEED and smartly are ensuring that absolutely everyone can get onto Windows 8 and Metro. As long as they have that then they can work on converting people to using Metro itself rather then the desktop and driving revenue from the new revenue streams therein.

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Posted

Why are you even a reporter at a tech site, it seems you hate everything that's newer then the year 2000

You should find something better to do, because trolling these forums is getting boring for all of us!

I've never even seem him write any articles on the front page or neogamr, and i've went searching through the articles with no success 0_o

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Posted

I've never even seem him write any articles on the front page or neogamr, and i've went searching through the articles with no success 0_o

didn't see one either but he has the title of reporter so I assume he must have written something

I just find it very weird that somebody with the title of reporter really seems to hate all new tech

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Posted

They're basically shooting themselves in the foot, going out of their release cycle would imply a lesser adoption of the OS especially when it comes to businesses.

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Posted

I'm not sure that i agree with you yowanvista, maybe a faster release cycle will result in a faster adoption rate for larger corporations. They'll still be behind but it will eliminate the 10 year wait from going XP > 7

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I'm not sure that i agree with you yowanvista, maybe a faster release cycle will result in a faster adoption rate for larger corporations. They'll still be behind but it will eliminate the 10 year wait from going XP > 7

Could be, in some cases but a lot of large enterprises are still using XP (and even Windows 2000). Some are just starting to test/prepare their software for a Windows 7 deployment. I really don't see why they would jump on Windows 8 atm given that they'd probably have to run a whole bunch of training sessions for their employees, the learning curve is quite steep from Windows 7 > Windows 8 and frankly speaking Metro UI/touchscreen stuff doesn't really find its place on buisiness PC. The average joe may love the new concept but enterprises are rather reluctant to even consider deploying Windows 8.

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You know we are approaching the end of the "personal" computing when news outlets start to refer to Windows as the " next-generation Windows client".

Windows has always been a client OS, dude. Not sure what you mean by that.

At this point, I'm looking forward to use a more mature ReactOS project and a DOSBox build capable of running the older (pre-NT) Windows version with ease.

You do that. Tell 1995 I said hello.

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I'm not sure that i agree with you yowanvista, maybe a faster release cycle will result in a faster adoption rate for larger corporations. They'll still be behind but it will eliminate the 10 year wait from going XP > 7

There might be some truth in that, too. Somewhere in there Microsoft is going to have to release an enterprise version, though.

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Posted

@yowanvista - I completely agree. i've come from a large enterprise where they only just started rolling out Windows 7 and its still in early phases so i know exactly what your saying. Corporate HQ in the US has moved over to 7 as far as i understand but this particular Australian arm (~4500) employees are still predominantly XP due to incompatibilities with current systems.

@Growled - No doubt about it an enterprise friendly edition will need to come.

This is imho BUT.. I can tell you right now a "metro" version of an Outbound dialler for a call center/collections business would be AWESOME. These are traditionally a crappy GUI that pulls info from a t system like visionplus or cardpac to make things easier/quicker for agents. With yearly updates and a leaner release cycle I think microsoft might be able to slowly sway larger corps over by addressing there needs.

Barring enthusiasts, People will learn what they need to know in order to do their role i don't think it is that much of a big deal.

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Posted

That's something else I didn't even think of. What I thought would be a big boom is in terms of POS systems. So many are touchscreen now with as you said, ugly GUIs.

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Posted

There might be some truth in that, too. Somewhere in there Microsoft is going to have to release an enterprise version, though.

Yeah, I could see them doing what, for instance, Ubuntu (and a lot of Linux distros) does - have the consumer releases that come out relatively often (once or twice a year), and then have long-term support releases that are supported for 5 years so that large corporations, universities, etc. don't have to do a massive computer update every six months.

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