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Woman's runny nose revealed to be leaking brain fluid

arizona cerebral spinal fluid meningitis neuronavigation

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#1 Hum

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Posted 04 December 2012 - 01:51

For four months, doctors believed one Arizona woman’s running nose was allergies. The truth turned out to be a much more horrifying scenario – brain fluid was leaking out of her nose. :|

According to the University of Arizona department of surgery, whenever Aundrea Aragon bent over, clear liquid would run out of her nose.

“I was scared to death and desperate,’’ Aragon said. “I knew it could not be allergies. The fluid would come out like a puddle.’’ :|

After she visited several doctors’, UA surgeons finally discovered two small cracks in the back of Aragon’s sphenoid sinus, which were caused by cerebral pressure. The crack ultimately allowed cerebral spinal fluid (CSF) to stream through her nose.

Although the human brain replaces brain fluid, the leak put Aragon at risk of developing meningitis, in which bacteria crawls through the brain, causing either a coma or death.

While the typical surgery to fix this condition is invasive and often results in a painful recovery process and other dangerous side effects, UA surgeons were able to fix Aragon’s condition without using any incisions. They performed an endoscopic procedure through her nose, using image-guided neuronavigation and fluorescein dye to locate the cracks. Then, using tissue from her nose and a small portion of belly fat, the surgeons were able to repair the cracks, stopping the leak.

The process liberated Aragon from a long, painful recovery. She is now recovering well at home with her husband and two children. She recently posted about her ordeal on her Facebook page.

“I am so grateful to [the UA surgeons] for everything they have done for us,’’ said Aragon. “I had great care from a great staff. I’m here, and I am grateful I can take care of my kids.”

source


#2 Growled

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Posted 04 December 2012 - 02:03

Wow, that is a bit scary since I have a cold at the moment and my nose is running.

#3 soumyasch

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Posted 04 December 2012 - 02:04

Why did the doctors take four months to figure that out? Any Grey's Anatomy fan would have figured that out in seconds.

On a serious note, it just goes to show how even seemingly benign symptoms shoudln't be taken lightly. Good for her that it was diagnosed before anything serious happened.

#4 OP Hum

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Posted 04 December 2012 - 02:07

Wow, that is a bit scary since I have a cold at the moment and my nose is running.


RIP

#5 Enron

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Posted 04 December 2012 - 02:25

So is this what they call brain drain?

#6 ArialBlue

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Posted 04 December 2012 - 02:29

Reading this made my head hurt

#7 DocM

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Posted 04 December 2012 - 04:53

Why did the doctors take four months to figure that out? Any Grey's Anatomy fan would have figured that out in seconds.


Because in the absense of facial trauma this falls into the rare & unexpected category. Even experienced clinicians look at the most likely causes first, and in real life there are few Dr. House MD's. They should, however, have sent a sample of that fluid to the lab where its origin should have been revealed.

On a serious note, it just goes to show how even seemingly benign symptoms shoudln't be taken lightly..


Yup.

#8 javagreen

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Posted 04 December 2012 - 09:57

What the... :o

#9 tiagosilva29

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Posted 04 December 2012 - 10:20

Even experienced clinicians look at the most likely causes first, and in real life there are few Dr. House MD's.

Horses and zebras.

#10 MikeChipshop

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Posted 04 December 2012 - 10:29

Holy moly!

#11 cork1958

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Posted 04 December 2012 - 10:56

Because in the absense of facial trauma this falls into the rare & unexpected category. Even experienced clinicians look at the most likely causes first, and in real life there are few Dr. House MD's. They should, however, have sent a sample of that fluid to the lab where its origin should have been revealed.



Yup.


No,
Actually it's because doctors are nothing more than high paid trial and error practitioners!! Haven't you ever noticed they NEVER get a diagnosis right on the first try? Or second, or third? It's called creating their own job security!!

#12 Nick H.

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Posted 04 December 2012 - 11:02

Actually it's because doctors are nothing more than high paid trial and error practitioners!! Haven't you ever noticed they NEVER get a diagnosis right on the first try? Or second, or third? It's called creating their own job security!!

:laugh:

I'm sorry, but I don't believe that for a second.

EDIT: Oh, and as for the article...wow, I'm going to get worried every time my nose starts running now!

#13 Dan~

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Posted 04 December 2012 - 11:13

Ouch, I'm going to an ENT specialist next month for endoscopic sinusr surgery, been blocked up for months. Wish mine leaked, would probably feel soo nice

#14 OP Hum

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Posted 04 December 2012 - 14:57

^ Drill some holes.

#15 soumyasch

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Posted 04 December 2012 - 16:24

Because in the absense of facial trauma this falls into the rare & unexpected category. Even experienced clinicians look at the most likely causes first, and in real life there are few Dr. House MD's. They should, however, have sent a sample of that fluid to the lab where its origin should have been revealed.


I apologize for not having explained the joke earlier. Here you go: http://abc.go.com/sh...re/89765?page=2



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