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Do we live in a computer simulation?


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#1 DocM

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Posted 11 December 2012 - 07:22

OK all you SIM's, wrap hour head around this. Seems connectable to the ideas about a holographic universe.


http://www.scienceda...21210132752.htm

Do We Live in a Computer Simulation Run by Our Descendants? Researchers Say Idea Can Be Tested

Dec. 10, 2012 — A decade ago, a British philosopher put forth the notion that the universe we live in might in fact be a computer simulation run by our descendants. While that seems far-fetched, perhaps even incomprehensible, a team of physicists at the University of Washington has come up with a potential test to see if the idea holds water.

The concept that current humanity could possibly be living in a computer simulation comes from a 2003 paper published in Philosophical Quarterly by Nick Bostrom, a philosophy professor at the University of Oxford. In the paper, he argued that at least one of three possibilities is true:

• The human species is likely to go extinct before reaching a "posthuman" stage.

• Any posthuman civilization is very unlikely to run a significant number of simulations of its evolutionary history.

• We are almost certainly living in a computer simulation.

He also held that "the belief that there is a significant chance that we will one day become posthumans who run ancestor simulations is false, unless we are currently living in a simulation."

With current limitations and trends in computing, it will be decades before researchers will be able to run even primitive simulations of the universe. But the UW team has suggested tests that can be performed now, or in the near future, that are sensitive to constraints imposed on future simulations by limited resources.

Currently, supercomputers using a technique called lattice quantum chromodynamics and starting from the fundamental physical laws that govern the universe can simulate only a very small portion of the universe, on the scale of one 100-trillionth of a meter, a little larger than the nucleus of an atom, said Martin Savage, a UW physics professor.

Eventually, more powerful simulations will be able to model on the scale of a molecule, then a cell and even a human being. But it will take many generations of growth in computing power to be able to simulate a large enough chunk of the universe to understand the constraints on physical processes that would indicate we are living in a computer model.

However, Savage said, there are signatures of resource constraints in present-day simulations that are likely to exist as well in simulations in the distant future, including the imprint of an underlying lattice if one is used to model the space-time continuum.

The supercomputers performing lattice quantum chromodynamics calculations essentially divide space-time into a four-dimensional grid. That allows researchers to examine what is called the strong force, one of the four fundamental forces of nature and the one that binds subatomic particles called quarks and gluons together into neutrons and protons at the core of atoms.

"If you make the simulations big enough, something like our universe should emerge," Savage said. Then it would be a matter of looking for a "signature" in our universe that has an analog in the current small-scale simulations.

Savage and colleagues Silas Beane of the University of New Hampshire, who collaborated while at the UW's Institute for Nuclear Theory, and Zohreh Davoudi, a UW physics graduate student, suggest that the signature could show up as a limitation in the energy of cosmic rays.

In a paper they have posted on arXiv, an online archive for preprints of scientific papers in a number of fields, including physics, they say that the highest-energy cosmic rays would not travel along the edges of the lattice in the model but would travel diagonally, and they would not interact equally in all directions as they otherwise would be expected to do.

"This is the first testable signature of such an idea," Savage said.

If such a concept turned out to be reality, it would raise other possibilities as well. For example, Davoudi suggests that if our universe is a simulation, then those running it could be running other simulations as well, essentially creating other universes parallel to our own.

"Then the question is, 'Can you communicate with those other universes if they are running on the same platform?'" she said




#2 ncc50446

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Posted 11 December 2012 - 07:34

I read Brian Greene's Hidden Reality, and this was my least favourite Multiverse theory...Just seemed like the least likely...I like the Holographic multiverse theory more, and I'm not much of a fan of that one either lol

#3 Pam14160

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Posted 11 December 2012 - 08:00

Damn, that just made me dizzy reading all that text that really didn't say anything. . .oh wait. . . :s

#4 insanelyapple

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Posted 11 December 2012 - 08:23

For me the questions are: is it rather holographic projection of saved state with no chances for changing it? Or its "base program" allows intelligent species to live on their own? Does it fully mimic reality of their creators? Or it is just like in Minecraft - a random seed generated for fun or rather specimen sample with basic environment.

#5 +virtorio

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Posted 11 December 2012 - 08:29

I blame The Matrix for this.

#6 +Phouchg

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Posted 11 December 2012 - 20:03

We must go deeper...

I believe this thread (albeit not tagged and named descriptively enough) talks exactly about this.

#7 McKay

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Posted 11 December 2012 - 20:07

Posted Image

#8 Jason S.

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Posted 11 December 2012 - 20:15

what did i just read :huh:

#9 Detection

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Posted 11 December 2012 - 20:24

The Double-Slit Experiment
When a camera observed the electrons, they acted as particles. However, when the no equipment was used to observe the electrons, they acted as waves and particles simultaneously.

http://www.highexist...lit-experiment/


I watched the above a while ago, particles change behaviour when watched

#10 BetaguyGZT

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Posted 11 December 2012 - 20:31

If this is true, might I beseech the Admin(s) of this simulation to tweak the parameters a bit?

Interesting stuff indeed.

#11 +Brando212

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Posted 11 December 2012 - 20:40

The Double-Slit Experiment
When a camera observed the electrons, they acted as particles. However, when the no equipment was used to observe the electrons, they acted as waves and particles simultaneously.

http://www.highexist...lit-experiment/


I watched the above a while ago, particles change behaviour when watched

that's rather interesting

#12 Detection

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Posted 11 December 2012 - 20:44

that's rather interesting


Yea I thought so too, meant to post about it ages ago but forgot what it was called until just now

#13 hckngrtfakt

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Posted 11 December 2012 - 20:49

The Double-Slit Experiment
When a camera observed the electrons, they acted as particles. However, when the no equipment was used to observe the electrons, they acted as waves and particles simultaneously.

http://www.highexist...lit-experiment/


I watched the above a while ago, particles change behaviour when watched


this almost directly correlates to the research on superconductor fractals and their influence on predictable
constants through energy permutation for what is believed to define a set of "higer universal laws"
which in theory are what controls and influences all the other subordinate laws, principles, ordinances,
and rules that govern function and form in the universe

tl;dr

It is possible to influence matter with other matter to react in a predictable way other than we are aware of in our surroundings
:)

#14 benplace

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Posted 11 December 2012 - 21:33

Sorry to burst your bubble but the double slit experiment is so misunderstood. The act of measurement affects the particles, it isn't the same as looking at them with your eyes...

#15 hckngrtfakt

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Posted 11 December 2012 - 23:37

Sorry to burst your bubble but the double slit experiment is so misunderstood. The act of measurement affects the particles, it isn't the same as looking at them with your eyes...


And what is sight but the proccess of light refraction passing through a cornea lens which is then morphed by a liquid

(light manipulation by exposure to specific chemical components)

:rofl: