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Ubuntu For Phones


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#31 Grinch

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Posted 04 January 2013 - 07:49

I honestly am going to wait until I can actually try it before placing judgement on it. It looks pretty cool.


#32 HawkMan

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Posted 04 January 2013 - 13:23

It looks really usable to me, don't know what you are on about. Fail? Wow, does everything you type always have to be so extreme? Why would it fail instantly? You are wrong, its only speculation from an usual very narcissistic commenter, hint hint. The abstract comparison to 1st gen phones baffle me, please do explain oh wise one. And get real, MS does a way worse job that implementing mobile OS features, it takes them forever to add the simplest of features which amazes me! And lol, if Ubuntu designers are a bunch of "geeks" - (dont even know what you are getting at here), them realistically the bunch at MS had to be a bunch of old 50'ish men, who sit all day in offices playing the game of what does the market want, when its blatantly obvious, like a slap to the face, but their arrogance clouds and destroys the progress of technology. yawn/ talking cr#p is so easy.... /s


How is MS way of implementing worse than this. Now since this OS isn't even on the market yet and will only be out for nexus devices for download and it's horribly laggy and it's a whole year until they have anything on the hardware roadmap, I don't think you should use this OS as an example of any kind of efficiency.

And back to usability. Firstly launching apps. Ubuntu lets you launch apps either from the horrible and least accessible left side swipe dock. Or from the worst designed mish mash home page ever. Where they tried to copy the information display and usability of the WP tile homescreen. And they failed at both of them. It looks bad and the information is so crowded, it's a terrible info centric area. And for launching apps... Well same issue.

Now give actually argument instead of ad hominem attacks and just saying "it's crap".

You wrote a big post with nothing but ad hominem and reasonless arguments.

#33 migo

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Posted 04 January 2013 - 20:05

I quite like the UI, and this certainly makes me more interested in Ubuntu as a platform (if only I could avoid frying my hardware in the process of trying to install it as a dual boot). I'd say it's possibly ahead of webOS as far as practicality and functionality goes, and I like it better than what RIM did for the PlayBook with the edges. Left is effectively bottom on the PlayBook, right is the sides, top is the top corners, and bottom is top. Making each edge do something different seems a bit more sensible than doubling up one (that said, RIM's implementation does work very well for a tablet with two hands).

#34 ViperAFK

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Posted 04 January 2013 - 20:22

How is MS way of implementing worse than this. Now since this OS isn't even on the market yet and will only be out for nexus devices for download and it's horribly laggy and it's a whole year until they have anything on the hardware roadmap, I don't think you should use this OS as an example of any kind of efficiency.

And back to usability. Firstly launching apps. Ubuntu lets you launch apps either from the horrible and least accessible left side swipe dock. Or from the worst designed mish mash home page ever. Where they tried to copy the information display and usability of the WP tile homescreen. And they failed at both of them. It looks bad and the information is so crowded, it's a terrible info centric area. And for launching apps... Well same issue.

Now give actually argument instead of ad hominem attacks and just saying "it's crap".

You wrote a big post with nothing but ad hominem and reasonless arguments.


again I don't see why the dock is "horrible" or "not accessible". It looks fairly intuitive and easy to use. I quite like that no matter what screen you are on you can easily swipe and pull out the dock. honestly the dock was one of my favorite things about the UI when I watched the video, I'd love to try it in action. Regarding speed and availability, of course that's to be expected since its still very early stages. Early android was notoriously laggy.

The home screen I didn't love, but I think you are exaggerating a bit... the first thing you see is all your apps (frequently used on the top and a button for all apps clearly visible), and they mentioned that the rest of the home screen should is customizable.

#35 Javik

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Posted 04 January 2013 - 20:23

And back to usability. Firstly launching apps. Ubuntu lets you launch apps either from the horrible and least accessible left side swipe dock. Or from the worst designed mish mash home page ever. Where they tried to copy the information display and usability of the WP tile homescreen. And they failed at both of them. It looks bad and the information is so crowded, it's a terrible info centric area. And for launching apps... Well same issue.


It has one advantage over the WP UI: It doesn't look like complete ass. Given that it's still in an early stage of development of course there are going to be some glitches but I imagine by the time a device actually launches improvement will be made.

#36 HawkMan

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Posted 04 January 2013 - 20:32

again I don't see why the dock is "horrible" or "not accessible". It looks fairly intuitive and easy to use. Regarding speed and availability, of course that's to be expected since its still very early stages. I quite like that no matter what screen you are on you can easily swipe and pull out the dock. honestly the dock was one of my favorite things about the UI when I watched the video, I'd love to try it in action.

The home screen I didn't love, but I think you are exaggerating a bit... the first thing you see is all your apps (frequently used on the top and a button for all apps clearly visible), and they mentioned that the rest of the home screen should is customizable.


the docks design is just plain bad, and again, looks exactly like older samsung and nokia touch phones. but most annoying, it's on the wrong side of the phone. ok for 3-4 inch phones, but for those who keep buying the new ridiculously large phones... it's unusable with one hand. even on a 4 inch phone, a left side swipe isn't the most practical for the average person, though my giant hands wouldn't have a problem.

It has one advantage over the WP UI: It doesn't look like complete ass. Given that it's still in an early stage of development of course there are going to be some glitches but I imagine by the time a device actually launches improvement will be made.


I find the WP UI looks cleaner and nice than that, and that's a useless advantage when you can't find any info because the UI layout is so messy and mashed together.

personally I take nice clean squares that are readable have a logical layout and gives information directly, over overly rounded corners, bevels and transparency(is there any effect they didn't add) in a mess if a layout so you have to search for the info any day.

Also with that bad performance they're going nowhere, they have android 2.1 performance on low end 100 dollar phone hardware on a modern day nexus...

unfortunately for them, as The Verge pointed out, the major thing that will kill them is a hardware roadmap that's mapped in years, where android makes have failed because their roadmaps where in months..

#37 ViperAFK

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Posted 05 January 2013 - 15:36

the docks design is just plain bad, and again, looks exactly like older samsung and nokia touch phones. but most annoying, it's on the wrong side of the phone. ok for 3-4 inch phones, but for those who keep buying the new ridiculously large phones... it's unusable with one hand. even on a 4 inch phone, a left side swipe isn't the most practical for the average person, though my giant hands wouldn't have a problem.



I find the WP UI looks cleaner and nice than that, and that's a useless advantage when you can't find any info because the UI layout is so messy and mashed together.

personally I take nice clean squares that are readable have a logical layout and gives information directly, over overly rounded corners, bevels and transparency(is there any effect they didn't add) in a mess if a layout so you have to search for the info any day.

Also with that bad performance they're going nowhere, they have android 2.1 performance on low end 100 dollar phone hardware on a modern day nexus...

unfortunately for them, as The Verge pointed out, the major thing that will kill them is a hardware roadmap that's mapped in years, where android makes have failed because their roadmaps where in months..


How do you know they are 'going nowhere with performance'? Its a brand new OS that isn't even released yet, you are making wild speculations.

#38 HawkMan

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Posted 05 January 2013 - 17:53

I said that with the performance they're showing now, they're going nowhere. and this is what they're showing off, it doesn't help that their hardware roadmap is empty for another year, that's just another sign heading to nowhere.

#39 migo

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Posted 05 January 2013 - 19:34

The one handed use paradigm is dying. The most popular phones are huge. It's not on the wrong side, because everyone uses two hands anyway.

#40 AJerman

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Posted 05 January 2013 - 19:58

I see this bringing linux front and center. is this the first flavor of linux to go phone?

Depends if you count android as a linux flavor. There was also meego, but nokia ditched it for WP8 it before it ever really had a chance.

:laugh: Yeah, Android is about as Linux as you can get.

Okay, so I made a number of posts over on the omgubuntu.co.uk comment page on this article, and it received a large majority of upvotes, but unsurprisingly upset people.

In my opinion, this is a terrible idea. It's a terrible idea for a number of reasons. First and foremost, it's likelihood of success is probably somewhere between 0 and 1%. The mobile market is cut throat, and the people have spoken in that all the large majority of people care about is Android or iPhone. They have driven nearly every other mobile OS to the grave. Now Canonical, with no mobile experience is supposed to just be like "Hey guy, we wanna play too!"? Not gonna happen. They don't have the experience or the capital to make this happen. Assuming they DID manage to make even a slight dent in the market, our patent systems are so screwed up that it's nearly impossible to step on someone's toes and get sued. When this happens, Apple, Google, and Microsoft have BILLIONS in the bank and more than enough money already set aside for lawyers to handle these things. Canonical would get crushed. Look at the really surprisingly large number of attempts from other companies to build a mobile OS to compete, usually from MUCH larger companies, or companies that have been invested in mobile handsets for years and years, and they can't even manage it.

Now, before you think I'm trying to just discourage them, Ubuntu for Android promised a lot of the best features that an Ubuntu Phone OS would provide. One of the keys being desktop dock mode. Because Android is already Linux, they say they can share the kernel and drivers with it and run Ubuntu side by side. This is a fantastic idea, and it uses the power of Linux to partner together and achieve more, rather than competing with each other in what's an all but guaranteed failure for Canonical. I would FAR rather seem them focus on Ubuntu for Android than an Ubuntu Phone OS. I would use Ubuntu for Android the second it came out, but I don't even have the slightest desire to ditch Android for a half baked mobile OS with no support.

Now, let's talk what we've seen. The design is somewhat unique, I'll give them that, but it's partly unique because it's poorly designed. Everything relies heavily on edges on this OS, which means you can kiss goodbye any case you have on your phone. I have an Otterbox Commuter on my One X, and Android already has a number of side swipe actions (for example, switching tabs in chrome), and I find these gestures very difficult to do with a case on. If an OS relied on that for the most simple of actions, you'd be screwed. So the initial design is already flawed and proving why Canonical needs to not try to jump all the way in, but worth with Android to extend it.

Don't get me wrong though. The future of phones, without even the slightest question, is as our sole computing device. In the future, when phones are fast enough (and the A15 chips area already going to be damn close), you'll have your phone as your only computing device. You'll use it on the go on it's smaller screen. When you get home, you toss it on the coffee table and it links up with your TV/Monitor and a keyboard/mouse and you have your full desktop, etc. To me it's blatantly obvious that this is the future of computing, so I understand where Ubuntu is coming from. They are trying to do exactly this, but they are trying to do it as an outsider in a very difficult market, and honestly a little before phones are ready for it (though they haven't released it yet, and it's likely to come out around the times of A15s becoming standard in phones, but their specs still list A9 as a minimum, but likely because there isn't much alternative at the moment except for the Qualcomm S4)

So in summary, I have mixed feelings about the idea, but I don't think it's the best use of Canonical's focus at the moment. Stick to Ubuntu on Android for now, and maybe if that can gain a little traction, then you can use it to segway into a full Ubuntu Phone OS.

#41 migo

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Posted 05 January 2013 - 20:48

One, it used to be that the people had spoken and all anyone wanted was an iPhone. Then Android got better. Now you say all anyone wants is Android and iOS, but Windows Phone is picking up steam, webOS had a great following before HP bungled it, millions of people are waiting for BlackBerry 10, and so on. The market definitely wants more than just Android or iOS. Whether Ubuntu is what they want specifically is a different question, but you're completely wrong that the market only wants two.

Edge use might be a polarising issue, but people love it on the N9, and people love it on the PlayBook. It's not bad design, in fact it's very good design. Some people just don't like good design - see the complaints about Metro and Unity for some glaring examples.

#42 HawkMan

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Posted 05 January 2013 - 21:27

The one handed use paradigm is dying. The most popular phones are huge. It's not on the wrong side, because everyone uses two hands anyway.


I think you'll find that the total market, the giant phones are significantly smaller compared to the sub 5 inch phones, individually large phones sell more than any smaller phone simply because there's less of them so less choice for those who want a giant phone. I also wonder how 7 inch tablets will affect the sales of 5+ inch phones.

#43 HawkMan

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Posted 05 January 2013 - 21:33

Edge use might be a polarising issue, but people love it on the N9, and people love it on the PlayBook. It's not bad design, in fact it's very good design. Some people just don't like good design - see the complaints about Metro and Unity for some glaring examples.


well, very few peopel have an N9, and the N9 isn't a big phone. in fact today it's a very small phone. the 920 is the regular size phone today. and then you have the ridiculous tab phones.

#44 migo

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Posted 05 January 2013 - 21:36

The total market is larger for smaller phones now because they've been around for longer and people haven't upgraded yet and because the larger phones are more expensive. People prefer bigger. When the iPhone launched it had the biggest screen, and that was a feature everyone liked.

#45 HawkMan

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Posted 05 January 2013 - 21:41

The total market is larger for smaller phones now because they've been around for longer and people haven't upgraded yet and because the larger phones are more expensive. People prefer bigger. When the iPhone launched it had the biggest screen, and that was a feature everyone liked.


uh, no they don't, "some" people do, these are the ones now buying the 5+ phones. but the average user don't want those huge phones, heck a large percentage of users don't even want touch phones today and get annoyed by the fat that it's impossible to not get a regular old phone.