Jump to content



Photo

Breakthrough battery technology

battery tech

  • Please log in to reply
11 replies to this topic

#1 Ice_Blue

Ice_Blue

    Neowinian

  • 1,387 posts
  • Joined: 02-February 09
  • Location: The Den Of Zen
  • OS: Windows 8.1 Pro x64
  • Phone: Nokia N8 Belle

Posted 03 January 2013 - 03:00

CNN's Jim Clancy talks with a U.S. scientist who invented a battery that can be charged with physical motion. Unable to embed video. Sorry.

Video


#2 Raa

Raa

    Resident president

  • 12,942 posts
  • Joined: 03-April 02
  • Location: NSW, Australia

Posted 03 January 2013 - 03:11

"Hold on guys, my laptop's low on battery..." <shakes it vigorously for a few minutes> "Okay, we're good!"

#3 srbeen

srbeen

    Neowinian

  • 1,014 posts
  • Joined: 30-November 11

Posted 03 January 2013 - 03:13

Its not a battery, its a power pack!

His demo was lackluster however, but this holds a LOT of promise. He claims 30kW from 1 cubic meter. I'm hopeful this is sustainable design.

"Hold on guys, my laptop's low on battery..." <shakes it vigorously for a few minutes> "Okay, we're good!"



#4 Xerxes

Xerxes

    Neowinian Senior

  • 6,292 posts
  • Joined: 06-January 04
  • Location: Melbourne, Australia
  • OS: Win8.1, OSX 10.9
  • Phone: Galaxy S4 Plus

Posted 03 January 2013 - 03:30

EDIT: Watched the video, it has promise but wait and see. Been down this road before and it didn't pan out so well, see if the technology has matured enough to deliver on it's promises this time....

This could work extremely well in mobile phones, having your phone recharge as it's in your pocket as you walk around is very compelling.

#5 HawkMan

HawkMan

    Neowinian Senior

  • 22,116 posts
  • Joined: 31-August 04
  • Location: Norway
  • Phone: Noka Lumia 1020

Posted 03 January 2013 - 06:19

Revolutionary new battery tech is reported at LEAST once a year.

#6 I am Reid

I am Reid

    Neowinian Senior

  • 4,409 posts
  • Joined: 03-November 05
  • Location: Columbus, Ohio

Posted 03 January 2013 - 06:58

Revolutionary new battery tech is reported at LEAST once a year.


yep, and nothing ever happens from it. Then they are forced every year to try to slim down the size of phones, but the battery tech never changes, so instead we just get skinny phones at the expense of having smaller batteries. Thanks phone designers!!!

#7 LUTZIFER

LUTZIFER

    Resident Evil

  • 2,686 posts
  • Joined: 09-January 02
  • Location: Vancouver Island, BC CANADA

Posted 03 January 2013 - 07:17

Lower bitrate with lossy audio != "as good."

And you know this how? Have you watched many of them at that size? I doubt it.
Pretty sure I'd know, as I have an awesome Blu-ray player, awesome TV, and many actual Blu-ray movies I've bought, so I'm damn sure I'd know any differences.

Just because your internet connection means you can easily download that sort of data, doesn't mean the rest of the world is even close to giving up on optical.

I'm probably on one of the crappiest high speed packages there is, 20Mbps, and the same company I deal with has pachages up to 250Mbps, and even that isn't any where remotely close to what service people in the USA can get. And those big files still take between 1 and 3 hours for me.

#8 spacer

spacer

    I'm awesome

  • 6,663 posts
  • Joined: 09-November 06
  • Location: Connecticut, USA
  • OS: Windows 7
  • Phone: Nexus 4

Posted 03 January 2013 - 21:16

I'm probably on one of the crappiest high speed packages there is, 20Mbps, and the same company I deal with has pachages up to 250Mbps, and even that isn't any where remotely close to what service people in the USA can get. And those big files still take between 1 and 3 hours for me.


20mbps is actually pretty high. I live in CT, a state (which I hope) is pretty high on the high-end internet market. A 20mbps connection costs and arm an a leg around here. Most affordable (read: normal) internet plans are somewhere between 10-12mbps.

#9 vetneufuse

neufuse

    Neowinian Senior

  • 17,126 posts
  • Joined: 16-February 04

Posted 03 January 2013 - 21:26

There's already Digital Downloads that are as good as Blu-ray. I download 3D movies that are 10 to 15 gig downloads and the quality is phenomenal.


I'm sure that 10Mbit stream is just as good as my 36Mbit Blu-ray hard copy..... losing that much bit rate has to have some degration on quality....

20mbps is actually pretty high. I live in CT, a state (which I hope) is pretty high on the high-end internet market. A 20mbps connection costs and arm an a leg around here. Most affordable (read: normal) internet plans are somewhere between 10-12mbps.


normal internet connections on cable now are 16Mbit+ Comcast's base package in the USA is 16Mbit now with burst rate up to 25Mbit... many other cable providers are following suit... so 16-20Mbit is pretty much the norm now days in the USA unless you live in the middle of no where with a slow as heck VRAD'ed DSL line or WISP

#10 DocM

DocM

    Neowinian Senior

  • 18,685 posts
  • Joined: 31-July 10
  • Location: Michigan

Posted 04 January 2013 - 00:34

I'm sure that 10Mbit stream is just as good as my 36Mbit Blu-ray hard copy..... losing that much bit rate has to have some degration on quality....


Depends on the MPEG-4 profile, the various encoder settings, and the viewer. Given the proper settings (multi-pass, noise reduction etc.) the average viewer may well not notice the difference, just as some (not half blind) folks still think their old SD TV's look better than HD panels. Drove me nuts when seeking input on image quality during the video HW / SW beta tests I got roped into participating in.

normal internet connections on cable now are 16Mbit+ Comcast's base package in the USA is 16Mbit now with burst rate up to 25Mbit... many other cable providers are following suit... so 16-20Mbit is pretty much the norm now days in the USA unless you live in the middle of no where with a slow as heck VRAD'ed DSL line or WISP


Only real advantages I see to those speeds is long downloads of big beta software builds like Premiere Pro, video editing HW hardware drivers or more than 2 people on the home network streaming Netflix, Hulu+ or Amazon movies simultaneously.

#11 Detection

Detection

    Detecting stuff...

  • 8,369 posts
  • Joined: 30-October 10
  • Location: UK
  • OS: 7 SP1 x64

Posted 04 January 2013 - 00:39

Only real advantages I see to those speeds is long downloads of big beta software builds like Premiere Pro, video editing HW hardware drivers or more than 2 people on the home network streaming Netflix, Hulu+ or Amazon movies simultaneously.


I have 76/18 and I thought the same, big downloads or sharing the connection with a few people, but in reality there are only about 20-30% of servers that can reach those speeds anyway

And even when they do, after the first month or so of having those speeds you still find yourself tapping you foot and thinking "hurry up"

#12 Raa

Raa

    Resident president

  • 12,942 posts
  • Joined: 03-April 02
  • Location: NSW, Australia

Posted 04 January 2013 - 00:48

Revolutionary new battery tech is reported at LEAST once a year.

Agreed, and we're still using Li-Ion or Li-Poly batteries. How old is that tech!
Where are the refillable batteries that were promised a few years ago? :(


I can see this new technology becoming the primary cause of broken phone screens... :p