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#16 OP DaDude

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Posted 07 January 2013 - 20:55

Even if has 20 years life left - what is the point when there is a much better way.


Because within the next few years, there will be a much better way than that much better way. ;)

Technology moves too fast and I just can't keep up with it anymore. And I don't think many HDTVs play files off of a USB. If they do, then this is definitely something new. Me and my family bought our HDTVs a few years ago and they didn't come with any option to play videos from a USB. And I will not trash a perfectly working LCD to keep up with the times. I'm not that kind of person.

BTW- With digital files, how do you guys skip chapters like on DVDs? What was great about DVDs was the ability to skip chapters in a video.


#17 +BudMan

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Posted 07 January 2013 - 21:22

And you will still be burning your stuff to DVD wont you ;)

#18 OP DaDude

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Posted 07 January 2013 - 21:56

So what digital file do you suggest I convert these recorded DVDs to? There are a ton of different video codecs out there....

I'm still trying to wrap my head around how DVDs could possibly be obsolete. Even new released Blu-rays come with a DVD, which in all honesty, annoys me. It's adds an extra disc and it jacks up the price of the product when I really don't need it. I buy the Blu-ray verson because I want the Blu-ray verson. Not sure why studios insist on including it.

And even if DVDs do become obsolte, unlike VHS, it will take a loooong time before there comes a time where you will be stuck and can't play your DVDs. Heck, there are still ways to play audio CDs even though I stopped buying CDs ten years ago. As long as the digital era stays, there will always be a way to play DVDs.

And it's actually more time consuing to take an Mpeg 2 video and convert it to a different format than to author the file to DVD. That is why I was looking for a software that does not re-encode. If the software doesn't re-encode, it takes less than 10 minutes to create the file.

#19 OP DaDude

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Posted 14 January 2013 - 16:14

So what digital file do you suggest I convert these recorded DVDs to? There are a ton of different video codecs out there....


Still waiting for an answer on this, Mr. BudMan. What codec is best? Divx? FLV? Please advise.

Thanks.

#20 clearlynotjoe

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Posted 14 January 2013 - 16:34

How about this program: http://cdburnerxp.se/ - free, got lots of options

Had used it for years, works well enough, but just don't use optical media anymore...

#21 OP DaDude

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Posted 14 January 2013 - 18:23

First of all, I think that's a burner software, not a DVD authoring software which formats Mpg2 videos to the DVD format.

Secondly, if I shouldn't use optical media anymore, then what's the point of using CDBurnerXP?

I can see why you guys want be to play through video files. It's more futureproof; I get it now. So, now this brings me to my other question which remains unanswered... what video codec should I convert my videos to?

#22 hckngrtfakt

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Posted 14 January 2013 - 18:32

First of all, I think that's a burner software, not a DVD authoring software which formats Mpg2 videos to the DVD format.

Secondly, if I shouldn't use optical media anymore, then what's the point of using CDBurnerXP?

I can see why you guys want be to play through video files. It's more futureproof; I get it now. So, now this brings me to my other question which remains unanswered... what video codec should I convert my videos to?


mp4/mkv

#23 +Brando212

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Posted 14 January 2013 - 18:36

mp4/mkv

i second this
though for your use mp4 would be better as most devices should be able to read that format
mkv is better than mp4 in that it can store multiple audio languages and subtitle languages (though not as many devices read it as of yet)

#24 Copernic

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Posted 14 January 2013 - 18:43

GUI for dvdauthor 1.07
http://download.videohelp.com/gfd/

#25 OP DaDude

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Posted 14 January 2013 - 19:30

mp4/mkv


Thank you. :)

#26 OP DaDude

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Posted 15 January 2013 - 03:15

Ok, just one more question. If DVD is a dying format, where you people suggest I store all those mp4 digital videos that I encode? Even a 32 GB USB flash drive is not enough to store all those videos I want to keep and even then, DVD discs have a longer lifespan than USB because USB flash drives are known to fail after excessive use. Ok, so I can buy a 1 TB hard drive. But still, what if the hard drive crashes? I lose all my videos?? There's a reason I'm clinging onto DVDs. They provide the best security that my videos will last for many years to come. Is there a better way to store all those GBs of videos that I plan to create??

#27 phackett

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Posted 15 January 2013 - 04:10

Hi DaDude,

Buy 2x 2TB Hard Drives and mirror them to give you your backup. In Australian money a Seagate Sata3 2TB HD costs $94. So 2 would cost you $192. To get the same amount of storage from DVD's based on 4.7GB per disc and assuming no wasted space, you would need 425 dvds. From the same supplier of the above Hard Drive the price for 100 Verbatim DVDs is $36 lets ignore the 25 and assume you buy even bundles that's $144. Now to ensure you don't lose any videos you'd want to back up those DVDs so that's another $144 (and a lot of hard work duplicating) for a total cost of $288 for a similar level of redundancy, but without the flexibility. The numbers are similar if you went for a 2xTB Drive option. Or alternatively, for a little more money but still cheaper and a lot more flexible than the DVD option, you could go for external USB Hard Drives, eg 2x Seagate 3.5 USB3.0 Expansion's is $218 (or $109 each). All of this is in Australian prices. :)

#28 +Brando212

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Posted 15 January 2013 - 04:16

Ok, just one more question. If DVD is a dying format, where you people suggest I store all those mp4 digital videos that I encode? Even a 32 GB USB flash drive is not enough to store all those videos I want to keep and even then, DVD discs have a longer lifespan than USB because USB flash drives are known to fail after excessive use. Ok, so I can buy a 1 TB hard drive. But still, what if the hard drive crashes? I lose all my videos?? There's a reason I'm clinging onto DVDs. They provide the best security that my videos will last for many years to come. Is there a better way to store all those GBs of videos that I plan to create??

that's a lot of what ifs there. you could play the same game with dvds. what if some moister gets under the label, what if they get too badly scratched .. etc

what I'm saying is you're over thinking it, and the truth of the matter is an external hard drive has a less chance of going bad over several years then a dvd-r going bad due to scratches and other factors. and trust me when i say from experience CD-Rs and DVD-Rs for whatever reason scratch a lot easier than professionally pressed disks

#29 OP DaDude

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Posted 15 January 2013 - 04:46

that's a lot of what ifs there. you could play the same game with dvds. what if some moister gets under the label, what if they get too badly scratched .. etc

what I'm saying is you're over thinking it, and the truth of the matter is an external hard drive has a less chance of going bad over several years then a dvd-r going bad due to scratches and other factors. and trust me when i say from experience CD-Rs and DVD-Rs for whatever reason scratch a lot easier than professionally pressed disks


True, but one scratched DVD means one lost movie. While one bad hard drive means HUNDREDS of movies lost!

#30 +Brando212

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Posted 15 January 2013 - 05:41

True, but one scratched DVD means one lost movie. While one bad hard drive means HUNDREDS of movies lost!

this is true, but this is why you'd do something like phackett recommended
or there's also options in the cloud, though for as many videos as it sounds like you have most will cost some money for that much storage (if anything you could always upload the videos to a private youtube account :))