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Posted

Teaming up for beyond Earth orbit exploration -


http://spaceref.com/news/viewpr.html?pid=39810

[quote][b]ESA Workhorse to Power NASA's Orion Spacecraft[/b]

ESA agreed with NASA today to contribute a driving force to the Orion spacecraft planned for launch in 2017. Ultimately, Orion will carry astronauts further into space than ever before using a module based on Europe's Automated Transfer Vehicle technology. Automated Transfer Vehicles (ATVs) have been resupplying the International Space Station since 2008. The fourth in the series, ATVAlbert Einstein, is being readied for launch next year from Kourou, French Guiana.

The ATV-derived service module, sitting directly below Orion's crew capsule, will provide propulsion, power, thermal control, as well as supplying water and gas to the astronauts in the habitable module. This collaboration between ESA and NASA continues the spirit of international cooperation that forms the foundation of the International Space Station.

ATV is a versatile showcase of European technology performing many functions during a mission to the International Space Station. The space freighter reboosts the Station and can even push the orbital complex out of the way of space debris. While docked, ATV becomes an extra module for the astronauts. Lastly, at the end of its mission it leaves the Space Station with waste materials.
v "ATV has proven itself on three flawless missions to the Space Station and this agreement is further confirmation that Europe is building advanced, dependable spacecraft," said Nico Dettmann, Head of ATV's production programme.

Thomas Reiter, ESA director of Human Spaceflight and Operations says: "NASA's decision to cooperate with ESA on their exploration programme with ESA delivering a critical element for the mission is a strong sign of trust and confidence in ESA's capabilities, for ESA it is an important contribution to human exploration."

Dan Dumbacher, deputy associate administrator for exploration systems development at NASA headquarters in Washington DC, agrees: "It is a testament to the engineering progress made to date that we are ready to begin integrating designs of an ESA-built service module with Orion."

The first Orion mission will be an uncrewed lunar fly-by in 2017, returning to Earth atmosphere at a speed of 11 km/s - the fastest reentry ever. [/quote]

Orion with ESA service module
[img]http://images.spaceref.com/news/ooesa.orion.jpg[/img]

Exploded diagram of launch configuration
[img]http://images.spaceref.com/news/2013/mg2_Orion-SM_labels.jpg[/img]

With Earth departure stage
[img]http://images.spaceref.com/news/2013/wg1_Orion_w_SM.jpg[/img]

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Posted

Makes me want to play Kerbal Space Program now.

I can't wait to see it launch.

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Posted

Looks good, but I'm not holding my breath on this, with NASA's current track record of completing projects.

Also Nico Dettmann sounds so full of himself, his whole statement was pretty much just stating how good he thinks they are.

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Posted

I've read a few statements by Dettmann that sounded that way. Dunno if it's intentional or if it's just poor phrasing, but his name & ego have been used in the same sentence on space forums before ;)

As to this proposal; it makes political sense, "international cooperation" and all, but programmatically it could cause complications or even delays if the right hand & left hand get out of synch. Orion needs that kind of complication like a hold in the head given its cost & mass overruns, launcher issues etc.

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Posted

Concept video of the Orion EM-1 (Earth-Moon One) mission, launched using the SLS (Space Launch System) super-heavy rocket and with the ESA service module. EM-1 is essentially a rerun of Apollo 8.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=ICXJARvHpaM

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Posted

Has NASA ever said how they plan on protecting Orion's crew from radiation on a deep space mission like one beyond the moon to Mars?

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Posted

Has NASA ever said how they plan on protecting Orion's crew from radiation on a deep space mission like one beyond the moon to Mars?

I remember a recent article where they stated that they don't have the shielding technology yet to protect the astronauts from radiation on a trip to Mars.  The astronauts would basically receive a fatal dose of radiation unless they could develop better shielding technology or an extremely fast propulsion system to minimize their time in space.

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Posted

Not quite correct.

First, the dose is measured in millisieverts (mSv). NASA's guidelines are that an astronauts lifetime dose should not exceed 1,000 mSv (or 1 Sv), which is associated with a 5% increase in the risk of fatal cancers.

According to the latest data from Curiosity's Radiation Assessment Detector (RAD), astronauts on a 360 day round trip would be exposed to 662 mSv. About the same as having a whole body CT scan per week. This seems under the limit, but a solar flare during the mission could put them well over the top.

Not necessarily fatal unless it were an X-class flare, but a higher risk of cancer than is deemed acceptable.

There are shields that could drastically reduce this, including an artificial magnetosphere to surround spacecraft and habitats with water blankets in theire walls (Bigelow), but they haven't been tested in space yet. These tests are likely in the next few years.

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Posted

NASA is a shadow of its former self. Personally, I think it's time to blow it away and start over with a better administration that actually flies to space, and takes the initiative to be a leader in scientific research. 

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Posted

We're talking 2 different missions, 360 day vs 500 day. Different assumptions, different risks.

Blame Conngress, both parties, for the last 45 years and Richard Nixon for cancelling NASA's Mars plans for after Apollo. They had a nuclear interplanetary engine all ready to go.

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Posted

Blame Conngress, both parties, for the last 45 years and Richard Nixon for cancelling NASA's Mars plans for after Apollo. They had a nuclear interplanetary engine all ready to go.

We're too concerned with upsetting the religious right nutjobs to get anything done over here anymore. God forbid science be allowed to thrive. 

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Posted

The religious right isn't the issue, even the Tea Party largely supports NASA. Those on both sides who want to divert NASA's budget for pork projects in their own districts are the problem. Many of these are actually liberals who would love to spend that money on social programs.

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Posted

it is part of the issue. We're loosing out on science in the class rooms, especially in the south. Without science in our class rooms, NASA doesn't have much of a future left, let alone Orion.

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Posted

NASA now stands for "Not A Space Agency".

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Posted

NASA is playing the Name Game again.

CEV (Crew Exploration Vehicle) has not been used for nearly 10 years. CEV begat Orion under Constellation, which was cancelled. We then had MPCV (Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle) which evolved into MPCV/Orion and later back to Orion. Now CEV is back in vogue.

What ever, it's budgeted at $1.2B a year (2014) and will be so expensive flying it to ISS was moved to the Commercial Crew program. Worse, 2 members of CC (Dragon and CST-100) could likely be upgraded to do CEV/Orion/MPCV/Orion/CEV's mission at a fraction the program cost.

I'm getting dizzy :rofl:

http://spaceref.com/news/viewsr.html?pid=44993

Synopsis - Nov 19, 2013
General Information
Solicitation Number: NNJ14491748R
Posted Date: Nov 19, 2013
FedBizOpps Posted Date: Nov 19, 2013
Recovery and Reinvestment Act Action: No
Original Response Date: Dec 02, 2013
Current Response Date: Dec 09, 2013
Classification Code: A -- Research and Development
NAICS Code: 541712
Set-Aside Code: Total Small Business
Contracting Office Address
NASA/Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center, Houston Texas, 77058-3696, Mail Code: BT

Description

NASA/JSC has a requirement for Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV) Cockpit Prototyping Phase 4 research and development (R&D). The objective of the Phase 4 work is to provide human machine interface R&D for defining CEV cockpit layout requirements, displays, and controls rapid prototyping using iterative interaction. The Government intends to award a follow-on contract to the CEV Cockpit Prototyping Phase 1, Phase 2, and Phase 3 Contracts. This acquisition will be a Firm Fixed Price, Indefinite Delivery Indefinite Quantity contract. The period of performance is planned for May 1, 2014, through April 30, 2019.

NASA/JSC intends to purchase the items from Aerospace Applications North America (AANA), Houston, TX. AANA is the CEV Cockpit Prototyping Phase 1, Phase 2, and Phase 3 contractor and has contracted with NASA on the three aforementioned R&D projects.

The CEV Cockpit Prototyping Phase 4 R&D tasks are an extension of work completed during Phases 1, 2, and 3. Due to AANA's extensive knowledge of the prototype code, the existing parsing tool, simulator scenario construction, and the current state of the evolving automated display software requirements definition and communication processes, AANA is uniquely positioned to continue to perform these tasks.

Interested parties shall be able to further develop the tools and concepts created during previous phases seamlessly utilizing ideas and lessons learned from three previous NASA R&D projects -- X38/CRV Human Machine Interface R&D, the Advanced Cockpit Evaluation System, and the Sensor Fusion Project.

The Government does not intend to acquire a commercial item using FAR Part 12.

Interested organizations may submit their capabilities and qualifications to perform the effort in writing to the identified point of contact not later than 4:00 p.m. local time on December 9, 2013. Such capabilities/qualifications will be evaluated solely for the purpose of determining whether or not to conduct this procurement on a competitive basis. A determination by the Government not to compete this proposed effort on a full and open competition basis, based upon responses to this notice, is solely within the discretion of the government.

Oral communications are not acceptable in response to this notice.

All responsible sources may submit an offer which shall be considered by the agency.

NASA Clause 1852.215-84, Ombudsman, is applicable. The Center Ombudsman for this acquisition can be found at http://prod.nais.nasa.gov/pub/pub_library/Omb.html .

Point of Contact

Name: Geraldine B. Mason
Title: Contracting Officer
Phone: 281-483-4714
Fax: 281-483-0503
Email: geraldine.b.mason@nasa.gov

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Posted

http://spaceflightnow.com/news/n1401/21mpcvesm/#.Ut6vBnMo7qA

ESA chief says Orion service module will be ready in 2017

The head of the European Space Agency says he has promised NASA the service module for the Orion crew exploration capsule will be delivered in time for an unmanned test flight by the end of 2017 despite problems with mass and development delays.
 
The service module's preliminary design review, a major developmental milestone in which engineers assess the maturity of the spacecraft's design, was delayed late last year from November to the spring.

Jean-Jacques Dordain, ESA's director general, told reporters Friday the design review will kick off at the beginning of April and run until May 15.

"The delay is linked to a number of technical problems, including mass-related issues," Dordain said.

But Dordain said he has assured NASA the six-month delay will not affect the service module's delivery schedule.

"I have undertaken to NASA that the delay in the PDR will not lead to any delay of the delivery of the service module," Dordain said Friday.

The service module is the Orion crew capsule's propulsion and power element and is based on Europe's Automated Transfer Vehicle, a robotic resupply freighter for the International Space Station.

Technicians will assemble the service module at Airbus Defence and Space's facility in Bremen, Germany, the site of ATV integration. Airbus will ship the service module to the Kennedy Space Center in Florida for attachment to the Orion crew vehicle built by Lockheed Martin Corp.

The European-built propulsion section has a height and diameter of about four meters, or 13 feet.

The schedule calls for the service module's arrival in Florida by the first quarter of 2017, but Dordain and Thomas Reiter, ESA's human spaceflight division chief, said the plan will be reassessed in June following the completion of the preliminary design review.

In a Jan. 10 interview, Reiter said engineers have made good progress on the service module's design documentation in the last few weeks.

Despite the delay of the PDR, Reiter said ESA will authorize Airbus Defence and Space to start procurement of "long-lead items which are more or less independent of the outcome of the PDR."

"We are trying to be as flexible and creative as possible," Reiter said.

ESA is ordering service module work to Airbus in slices and is waiting to award the next big contract, known as the Phase C/D contract, after the preliminary design review.

The PDR delay "cuts down the time we have to prepare our C/D contract with industry, but it's achievable," Reiter said.

The flight at the end of 2017 will be the first full-up space mission for the Orion multipurpose crew vehicle, but it will not carry astronauts. The spacecraft will blast off on NASA's heavy-lift Space Launch System, a mega-rocket under development using recycled and redesigned space shuttle technologies.
>

orion_400335.jpg

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Posted

ESA knows that they don't need the Service module ready by 2017 because the SLS will not be ready by then.

 

I also like how they are confident they can be ready by 2017 when the design isn't complete, what if they have to design and build something new which takes an extra year.

 

I wish NASA had more funds.

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Posted

I doubt NASA will ever be the same again. America is currently in a large battle with Science and idiocy, and unfortunately, idiocy is winning.

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I doubt NASA will ever be the same again. America is currently in a large battle with Science and idiocy, and unfortunately, idiocy is winning.

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0387808/

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