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Posted

People who have lost their vision as a result of a rare genetic disease may soon be able to have some of their sight restored, thanks to the first FDA-approved eye implant.

The implant, named the Argus II, works to wirelessly transmit images to the brain through a video camera and transmitter on a pair of glasses.

The FDA approved the device from Second Sight Medical Products for patients 25 years and older Thursday, The Associated Press reported.

While the implant does not restore vision, the FDA said the device might help the blind to see by allowing them "to detect light and dark in the environment."

The device is only approved for retintis pigmentosa, a disorder that causes gradual blindness and affects 100,0000 people in the United States.

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Posted

The implant, named the Argus II, works to wirelessly transmit images to the brain through a video camera and transmitter on a pair of glasses.

What if your brain doesn't support 802.11n or Bluetooth to receive the images?

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Posted

The Argus II has the antenna & receiver built into the retinal implant, where it's signal is passed to an electrode that stimulates the retina..

The glasses have the camera & transmitter, and they're both wired to a small belt computer for pre-transmission real time image processing.

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Posted

this is so touching and impressive, what a wonderful development and gives so much hope. alongside genetic and medical research, cybernetics also offer great hope. I applaud this and wish it will go on to bring a new life to people who need it worldwide. truly and incredible advancement!

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Posted

This just a low resolution beginning. The Argus will get much higher resolutions; stem cell therapies to grow a new retina are in trials both in the US and Europe; and work continues on a shape-compliant bio-silicons electrode that would be put right over the brains surface to feed video directly into the visual cortex. And then the really weird stuff comes into play; contact or implantable lenses with built-in IR, night, or telescopic/microscopic capabilities etc.

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Posted

What if your brain doesn't support 802.11n or Bluetooth to receive the images?

and surely you'll need to pay yearly subscription fee or the glasses will undergoes reduced functions during grace period and will totaly non-functional if you keep refusing to pay the subcribtion fee !

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Posted

How many fps do you get on these glasses?

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Posted

If you walked into a bank with these glasses, all hands would go up. :laugh:

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Posted

How many fps do you get on these glasses?

Most of the devices with cameras are using standard CCD's, meaning either PAL (24 fps) or NTSC (30 fps.) There are also retina mounted self-powered photoelectric sensors that essentially mount an array of tiny solar cells whose output is continuous.

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Posted

If you walked into a bank with these glasses, all hands would go up. :laugh:

They just need to come in a Geordi La Forge edition.

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Posted

What if your brain doesn't support 802.11n or Bluetooth to receive the images?

You're thinking wrong. :p

After just reading an article about a bionic hand, it's good to think about what's coming up in the future!! :D

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Posted

They just need to come in a Geordi La Forge edition.

I always thought Geordi's VISOR allowed him to see under peoples clothes.

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