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Posted

A five-year-old boy who racked up a

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Posted

I heard Apple refunded the money, a pretty rare move of kindness from them. To be frank I don't even think they needed to, the parents should have been more careful.

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Posted

Since I don't have iTunes, do they have limits to what you can charge built in? I would think this would be great for parents.

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Posted

Why are you letting a 5 year-old on a computer ... :laugh:

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To be frank I don't even think they needed to, the parents should have been more careful.

Yes they should have but $105 for (automatic) in-app purchases to progress in a game? It's clear the developers did it as a way to rip people off or people who don't read the information properly. A brand new PC/PS3/360/Wii game costs like $60...and this iPad game racked up $2200 in 15mins?

Wish they mentioned what game this was.

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Posted

A five-year-old boy who racked up a
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Posted

Seems like there are a lot of scam applications on apple devices -

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Posted

parents should have enable restrictions, that will make any in-app purchase to require a password. by default there is only a ok/cancel button to confirm the purchase...

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Posted

Since I don't have iTunes, do they have limits to what you can charge built in? I would think this would be great for parents.

Yes. This used to be a problem way back in iOS3 or so, but since then they've made entering the password for in-app purchases required. The father had to enter the password at least twice for this to happen.

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Posted

Ok, if I get an email and its from a valid source saying I owe money, I would be calling right away to make sure it was a mistake. The guy wasnt very bright for not calling as soon as he saw the emails.

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The sort of predatory business practices being employed by these apps developers are completely immoral and should be banned. They are not legitimate products; they are designed entirely to exploit users, particularly children.

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Posted

Yes they should have but $105 for (automatic) in-app purchases to progress in a game? It's clear the developers did it as a way to rip people off or people who don't read the information properly. A brand new PC/PS3/360/Wii game costs like $60...and this iPad game racked up $2200 in 15mins?

Wish they mentioned what game this was.

I actually agree, it's clear the developers are also trying to rip their players off as well. Perhaps Apple need to start examining in app purchasing systems in a bit more detail before apps get approved.

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Posted

God, I hate when these stories pop up. Parents need to know that an iPad (or any other tablet or phone) is not a babysitter. And if you plan to let your kid use them, for the love of Darwin, turn on the parental controls! They're there to stop incidents like this from happening! They should consider themselves lucky Apple refunded them, so they haven't been punished for their stupidity.

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Posted

God, I hate when these stories pop up. Parents need to know that an iPad (or any other tablet or phone) is not a babysitter. And if you plan to let your kid use them, for the love of Darwin, turn on the parental controls! They're there to stop incidents like this from happening! They should consider themselves lucky Apple refunded them, so they haven't been punished for their stupidity.

Parental oversight should play a role but that doesn't excuse predatory and immoral business practices. Apple should be taking a hard stance on charges like this, as it is completely unreasonable for in-app charges to amount to huge amounts more than the price of a second hand car in such a short amount of time without the explicit consent of the account holder. When you're talking about thousands of pounds in charges for trivial in-game items there should be a cooling-off period to ensure that users are not falling victim to deceptive business practices.

I was astonished by the price of some in-game items in "free" games on the Android market, with bundles being offered for in-game credits costing as much as

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Posted

I think people are missing off what really happened.

the dad entered the password to make a purchase thinking it was free

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-bristol-21629210

'Danny Kitchen, from Bristol, was using the family's iPad when father Greg put in a pass code, believing his son was downloading a free game.'

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Posted

He should have made sure it was a free download with no catches and not taken his son's word for it. Entirely the parent's fault. They had a passcode on there for a purpose.

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Posted

While in retrospect it's clear he should have had in app purchases disabled. Who would have ever thought a free game would have add ons at

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Posted

Parental oversight should play a role but that doesn't excuse predatory and immoral business practices. Apple should be taking a hard stance on charges like this, as it is completely unreasonable for in-app charges to amount to huge amounts more than the price of a second hand car in such a short amount of time without the explicit consent of the account holder. When you're talking about thousands of pounds in charges for trivial in-game items there should be a cooling-off period to ensure that users are not falling victim to deceptive business practices.

I was astonished by the price of some in-game items in "free" games on the Android market, with bundles being offered for in-game credits costing as much as

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Posted

Honestly, it's not surprising to me at all. One of my best friends fell into depression recently, and racked up $1500+ in expenses on Guild Wars 2. Needless to say, he had a problem. He got refunded though, I guess when he realized how serious he screwed up... I dunno. It's like a gambling addiction to some I suppose.

Did he rack up $1500 in 10mins? This "game" charged their credit card multiple times automatically for a total of $2200 in 10-15mins of gaming. THAT'S the screwed up bit.

The parents should have checked before putting in the password but who would have thought that it could amount to that many charges in that short a time?

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Posted

I wouldn't be able to sit down on my @ss for a year if I had of done something like that as a kid.

And yeah, I totally agree with others saying parents need to pay more attention to what their kids are doing and stop letting them play with things they shouldn't be touching.

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Posted

I'm more alarmed that a five year old was on an iPad. I was raised in the 90s and I did not touch a video game until I was in the 6th grade... Why, because of technological advances, do parents feel the need to neglect important aspects of childhood--such as playing outside and getting dirty, or writing/reading/drawing? I remember a study done that indicates parents who do not let their children use their imagination tend to be unable to creatively express themselves later on (that's probably a big "DOH!"). Now that I'm older I'm saddened I didn't play outside more, or read more, or draw more (despite me doing it all the time as a kid)! The drudgery of everyday life, especially the almighty computer in the modern world, make me cherish the moments I was really free of them.

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Posted

Did he rack up $1500 in 10mins? This "game" charged their credit card multiple times automatically for a total of $2200 in 10-15mins of gaming. THAT'S the screwed up bit.

The parents should have checked before putting in the password but who would have thought that it could amount to that many charges in that short a time?

No, but that's irrelevant, isn't it? We can talk about horrible business models, pricing, and so forth until we're blue in the face, but so long as you give a kid access to something that can pull money out of your account, whether it's 5 minutes or 5 days, you're still an irresponsible person. Considering the purchases that can be made in some games, it's definitely worth noting at least.

Lf20ryE.jpg

(yes, I know how RMAH works but just a helpful image to demonstrate the ugly side of "micro"transactions)

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Posted

Turning off in-app purchases is not exactly an obvious setting for most parents, you would have to go digging to find that it even exists even if it is obvious to us geeks (and geek parents) who are more resourceful.

My advice to others is to use iTunes Gift Cards instead to limit the potential charges that can be accrued Also it is very common to find discounted iTunes Gift Cards so it saves money also.

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Posted

That is disgraceful, allowing an app on the market to charge that sort of money for a game

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