23 posts in this topic

Posted

Jeff Bezos (Amazon.com & Blue Origin Aerospace) has mounted a salvage mission to recover the monster F-1 engines from the US Saturn V moon rockets.

http://m.popsci.com/technology/article/2012-03/amazons-bezos-plans-salvage-apollo-11-rocket-engines-atlantic-floor

[quote]Renowned space fan and would-be space explorer Jeff Bezos is the latest billionaire with his head in the deep ocean. This time it

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Posted

That's a heck of a find. I suspect it's going to be quit the rescue job too.

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Posted

Very awesome. I would definitely want to see those in a museum.

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Posted

THEY'VE GOT ONE!!

Apparently they've got enough pieces to make 2 complete engines. So bloddy cool!!

Story, pics and video on the expedition site -

http://www.bezosexpeditions.com/updates.html

F-1 thrust chamber -

[img]http://www.bezosexpeditions.com/img/gallery/image_1_lg.jpg[/img]
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Posted

Aren't the blueprints still lying around somewhere? This isn't like it's some amazing lost technology...

Having said that, I can understand the nostalgic value of finding the originals..

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Posted

Very cool (Y)

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Posted

There is talk of using an upgraded F-1 engine, the F-1A which was designed but never flown, in liquid side boosters for the NASA SLS (Space Launch System) launcher. It would initially use solids, upgraded and lengthened units based on the Shuttle SRB's, then evolve to liquid side boosters.

SLS may or may not fly as costs are seriously overrunnibg and private large boosters are coming at much lower costs.

SpaceX's Falcon Heavy can lift half as much, but costs 1/8 what SLS does, making multiple partial launches and space assembly practical, and SpaceX is working on a launcher even more powerful thsn SLS but cheaper. ULA also has a Heavy version of Atlas V designed, but Congress has passed on it.

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Posted

What are they doing under the ocean in the first place? Couldn't they have been disposed of properly? :s

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Posted

[quote name='68k' timestamp='1363841838' post='595589688']
What are they doing under the ocean in the first place? Couldn't they have been disposed of properly? :s
[/quote]
They are released from the Rocket while it is heading away from the planet so they fell towards earth and I am guessing they probably landed in the Ocean and have not been found till now.
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Posted

[quote name='Fractalize' timestamp='1363843324' post='595589696']

They are released from the Rocket while it is heading away from the planet so they fell towards earth and I am guessing they probably landed in the Ocean and have not been found till now.[/quote]

Correct. Current launchers are expendable launch vehicles, or ELV's. US military qualified launchers are known as Evolved ELV's or EELV's.

The first stage of most rockets gets it to a high altitude and about Mach 6-12 where it runs out of fuel. Thd first stage then falls away, crashing into the sea or some remote place like the Kazakh steppes, and the upper stage(s) take the payload to orbit. These upper stages usuall burn up re-enterig the atmosphere.

Powerhouses like Atlas V, Falcon 9, Delta IV etc. use 2 stages, but some launchers like Soyuz or Proton need to use 3 or even 4 stages for their heaviest payloads.

SpaceX is attempting go change this paradigm with their Grasshopper project (see that thread) which is an attempt to build a completely reusable launch vehicle, or RLV. This would drastically lower launch costs.

Their first attempt to use lessons learned during Grasshopper comes late this June when they'll try to bring down a Falcon 9 first stage to a soft touchdown in the Pacific, landing propulsively tail-first like in the 1950's sci-fi movies. If it works they'll attach landing gear and try to bring it down on land

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Posted

yup, they're big lumps :)

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Posted

[quote name='Mark' timestamp='1363832435' post='595589584']
Aren't the blueprints still lying around somewhere? This isn't like it's some amazing lost technology...
[/quote]

That's not the point. They aren't recovering them to see how they were built; they want to put them in a museum because of their historic importance.

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Posted

Some amazing photos

[img]http://i.space.com/images/i/000/027/268/original/apollo-11-f1-engine-thrust-chamber-seabed.jpg?1363793736[/img]

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Posted

It's amazing that they could find something that "small" in the freaking ocean.

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Posted

It's pretty cool that remains of the rocket were found, but it's just a huge reminder how wasteful our space programs are.
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Posted

[quote name='ahhell' timestamp='1363871326' post='595590134']
It's amazing that they could find something that "small" in the freaking ocean.
[/quote]

With side-scan sonar you can get very detailed images of large areas of sea floor rather quickly, then you send down robotic submersibles studded with cameras and lights to check out suspicious targets.

Side scan sonar image
[img]http://www.personal.psu.edu/cbg5012/sidescan_pic.jpg[/img]

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Posted

[quote name='DocM' timestamp='1363839800' post='595589670']
There is talk of using an upgraded F-1 engine, the F-1A which was designed but never flown, in liquid side boosters for the NASA SLS (Space Launch System) launcher. It would initially use solids, upgraded and lengthened units based on the Shuttle SRB's, then evolve to liquid side boosters.
[/quote]
The SLS is designed to use RS-25 engines (4) which are really just upgraded Shuttle main engines, not the F1.
[url="http://www.nasa.gov/pdf/664158main_sls_fs_master.pdf"]http://www.nasa.gov/pdf/664158main_sls_fs_master.pdf[/url]

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Posted

[quote name='HSoft' timestamp='1363887423' post='595590616']

The SLS is designed to use RS-25 engines (4) which are really just upgraded Shuttle main engines, not the F1.
[url="http://www.nasa.gov/pdf/664158main_sls_fs_master.pdf"]http://www.nasa.gov/pdf/664158main_sls_fs_master.pdf[/url][/quote]

That's for the core (center) stage. I'm talking about the side boosters.

Initially the side boosters will be solids made by ATK, but later NASA plans on a competition between those and liquid fueled alternatives. There are 2 major liquid engine alternatives;

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Posted

With side-scan sonar you can get very detailed images of large areas of sea floor rather quickly, then you send down robotic submersibles studded with cameras and lights to check out suspicious targets.

Side scan sonar image
sidescan_pic.jpg

 

What am I looking at in this sonar image exactly?

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Posted

What am I looking at in this sonar image exactly?

Looks like a ship to me.

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Posted


Yup.

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