Jump to content



Photo

"Worst" file-sharing pirates spend 300% more on content


  • Please log in to reply
11 replies to this topic

#1 MightyJordan

MightyJordan

    Don't stop BOlieving!

  • 16,201 posts
  • Joined: 15-January 06
  • Location: Plymouth, England
  • OS: Windows 8.1 Pro x64
  • Phone: Google Nexus 5 32GB

Posted 10 May 2013 - 13:33

Telecoms regulator Ofcom has just published a study into the state of online copyright infringement in the UK, with some very interesting conclusions. The researchers found that 10% of the country’s most prolific infringers are responsible for almost 80% of all infringements carried out online, but with a bonus. These plus an additional 10% of infringers spend 300% more than ‘honest’ consumers who don't infringe copyright at all.

Early 2012 UK telecoms regulator Ofcom commissioned research designed to track consumer behavior and attitudes towards the legal and illegal consumption of copyrighted material.

The research targeted Internet users over 12 years old with the aim of gathering information on the way they consume movies, music, TV shows, video games, software and books to assist with copyright enforcement policy making. The results are now in and they interesting to say the least.

The researchers split infringers into several categories according to their attitudes and motivations.

So-called ‘Justifying Infringers’ were the group who demonstrated the highest levels of infringing behavior. This group accounted for 9% of all infringers, 24% of total infringed volume and 2% of total digital consumers. They felt that they’d already spent enough on content (the researchers say this was confirmed) but like to try before they buy. They’re also the most receptive group when it comes to considering fairly priced legal alternatives.

The ‘Digital Transgressors’ group (9% of all infringers, 22% of total infringed volume, 2% of total digital consumers) consumed more films and TV shows than the ‘Justifying Infringers’. While they showed the least remorse over their behavior, this group had the highest fear of getting caught and the researchers say they would be the most receptive to warning notices sent by ISPs.

The largest group, the ‘Free Infringers’ (42% of infringers, 35% of infringed volume, 10% of total digital consumers) lived up to their name. They all download content because its free and pay for the lowest proportion of legal content compared to the other infringers.

Ambiguous Infringers (39% of infringers, 20% of infringed volume, 9% of total digital consumers) had the lowest level of digital consumption and the highest proportion of paid and legal content. They made less attempt to justify their infringing.


Read the rest of the article here.


#2 Aheer.R.S.

Aheer.R.S.

    I cannot Teach Him, the Boy has no Patience!

  • 11,529 posts
  • Joined: 15-October 10

Posted 10 May 2013 - 13:34

First, quick read of the article made me think of the 'try before you buy' arguement that I hear all the time when speaking to people I know who do that

#3 Deleted Bye

Deleted Bye

    Neowinian Senior

  • 3,781 posts
  • Joined: 17-June 09

Posted 10 May 2013 - 13:49

300% more maybe but they pirate 10,000% more too, Seems like a net loss still to me.

#4 Aheer.R.S.

Aheer.R.S.

    I cannot Teach Him, the Boy has no Patience!

  • 11,529 posts
  • Joined: 15-October 10

Posted 10 May 2013 - 13:55

300% more maybe but they pirate 10,000% more too, Seems like a net loss still to me.

Well if we're just going to throw random numbers around, 1,000,000% of all pirates still buy more legitimate media than honest consumers :p

#5 lunamonkey

lunamonkey

    Ten years on Neowin.

  • 9,026 posts
  • Joined: 28-May 03
  • Location: Swindon, England

Posted 10 May 2013 - 13:56

300% more maybe but they pirate 10,000% more too, Seems like a net loss still to me.


There is no "loss": they've bought to their means and then stopped, or they wouldn't have bought it at all if they didn't pirate it. A large portion would opt for the "I'll go without it then" over the "I'll go into my savings for it."

#6 the better twin

the better twin

    Neowinian Senior

  • 1,710 posts
  • Joined: 26-January 10
  • OS: Win 8
  • Phone: Nokia Lumia

Posted 10 May 2013 - 13:57

300% more maybe but they pirate 10,000% more too, Seems like a net loss still to me.

If you assume all the stuff they pirate they would have spent money on otherwise. A common fallacy.

#7 Houtei

Houtei

    Neowinian

  • 578 posts
  • Joined: 02-November 07

Posted 10 May 2013 - 14:01

Well probably just me but I use to pirate a lot of software and movies. I also went to the theater every week almost and bought a few games and what not every month as well. I have haven't pirated anything in the last year and also I have not been to theater once and only bought 1 game all year. Maybe just a coincidence. Or I am just getting older lol. I just do not like paying for something that has a 50/50 chance to suck.

#8 Deleted Bye

Deleted Bye

    Neowinian Senior

  • 3,781 posts
  • Joined: 17-June 09

Posted 10 May 2013 - 14:38

Well if we're just going to throw random numbers around, 1,000,000% of all pirates still buy more legitimate media than honest consumers :p

you mean me? or the original article author? This is what i meant, numbers can just be thrown out there

There is no "loss": they've bought to their means and then stopped, or they wouldn't have bought it at all if they didn't pirate it. A large portion would opt for the "I'll go without it then" over the "I'll go into my savings for it."

I know this concept, but we don't know about the details


If you assume all the stuff they pirate they would have spent money on otherwise. A common fallacy.

I know this, I have done it.



I am willing to bet the top 10% as stated in the article are NOT users but collectors and distributors.

#9 Jason Stillion

Jason Stillion

    Neowinian

  • 1,391 posts
  • Joined: 04-April 12
  • Location: United States

Posted 10 May 2013 - 15:12

If the content owners didn't treat there customers like criminals 1st, and refuse to even acknowledge the full truth of the situations.
Copyright won't be such a polarizing issue. The flat denial of pirates don't buy software, ever copy is treated as a lost sale only adds to the hate against them.

I believe the long term solution is to make media prices reasonably, make no/minimal drm. When they remove the general "hate" of a company, peer pressure, and feeling bad about copying content decreases the privacy level, and increases sales.

#10 Growled

Growled

    Neowinian Senior

  • 41,508 posts
  • Joined: 17-December 08
  • Location: USA

Posted 11 May 2013 - 04:37

How can they know this stuff? Seems to me like they are just throwing numbers out there and hopes someone will believe them.

#11 soldier1st

soldier1st

    Software Tester/Tech/Linux Lover

  • 5,302 posts
  • Joined: 21-December 03
  • Location: Guess Where
  • OS: Windows 7,Android,Linux Mint
  • Phone: HTC Incredible S

Posted 11 May 2013 - 04:52

If the content owners didn't treat there customers like criminals 1st, and refuse to even acknowledge the full truth of the situations.
Copyright won't be such a polarizing issue. The flat denial of pirates don't buy software, ever copy is treated as a lost sale only adds to the hate against them.

I believe the long term solution is to make media prices reasonably, make no/minimal drm. When they remove the general "hate" of a company, peer pressure, and feeling bad about copying content decreases the privacy level, and increases sales.

I'm with you on that. prices are getting worse every year, and your getting less for your money as well. it gets me angry when i think about it.

#12 OP MightyJordan

MightyJordan

    Don't stop BOlieving!

  • 16,201 posts
  • Joined: 15-January 06
  • Location: Plymouth, England
  • OS: Windows 8.1 Pro x64
  • Phone: Google Nexus 5 32GB

Posted 11 May 2013 - 08:48

How can they know this stuff? Seems to me like they are just throwing numbers out there and hopes someone will believe them.

Well, the study was done by Ofcom (Office of Communications), who are the government authority for the broadcasting, telecommunication and postal industries, so when a government-backed corporation is saying what they've said in the article, it throws quite the spanner in the works of bullies like the RIAA (or over here, the BPI).