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http://i.medicalxpress.com/news/2013-05-cocaine-vaccine-key-hurdle.html

[quote]Researchers at Weill Cornell Medical College have successfully tested their novel anti-cocaine vaccine in primates, bringing them closer to launching human clinical trials. Their study, published online by the journal Neuropsychopharmacology, used a radiological technique to demonstrate that the anti-cocaine vaccine prevented the drug from reaching the brain and producing a dopamine-induced high.

"The vaccine eats up the cocaine in the blood like a little Pac-man before it can reach the brain," says the study's lead investigator, Dr. Ronald G. Crystal, chairman of the Department of Genetic Medicine at Weill Cornell Medical College.

"We believe this strategy is a win-win for those individuals, among the estimated 1.4 million cocaine users in the United States, who are committed to breaking their addiction to the drug," he says. "Even if a person who receives the anti-cocaine vaccine falls off the wagon, cocaine will have no effect."

Dr. Crystal says he expects to begin human testing of the anti-cocaine vaccine within a year.

Cocaine, a tiny molecule drug, works to produce feelings of pleasure because it blocks the recycling of dopamine

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cool

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This seams like a great idea. I wonder how many of the 1.4 million are actually committed enough to use this. Most people "fall of the wagon" because they never wanted to give up in the first place.

The statistics after this will be interesting, how many of the 1.4 million take up a different drug after the cocaine no longer works.

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Anyone who is arrested for cocaine use/trafficking should be forced to take this for a year period.

Should this work, herion and meth should also be able to be removed from the body using the same technique to inhibit their high.

And let me go out on a limb here, but if its 'eaten up' by the antibodies, then a user has NO ability to overdose from it, correct?

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I wonder how this would affect people that could need codine based pain killers in the future

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a drug to get off a drug lol, that won't be abused at all. Joking aside the only way this works is if the people actually take it and stick to it and not willingly relapse.

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Posted

Very neat idea. I like how even if you take cocaine it has no effect after taking the anti-vaccine.

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[quote name='srbeen' timestamp='1368403242' post='595686392']Anyone who is arrested for cocaine use/trafficking should be forced to take this for a year period.[/quote]

It concerns me that you think it's appropriate to force such a treatment upon somebody. Forced medical treatment violates human rights and centuries of medical practice. However, such a vaccine could be offered in exchange for reduced criminal sentences and should be offered for free to anybody addicted to cocaine. Portugal has demonstrated that decriminalisation can reduce drug usage and increase the number seeking medical treatment for addiction and that is something that other countries should seriously consider, especially the US with it's incredibly draconian and racially biased drug laws.
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[quote name='theyarecomingforyou' timestamp='1368405709' post='595686478']
Portugal has demonstrated that decriminalisation can reduce drug usage and increase the number seeking medical treatment for addiction and that is something that other countries should seriously consider, especially the US with it's incredibly draconian and racially biased drug laws.
[/quote]

I have never understood how that works. You would think decriminalization and having more access to drugs would bring about more drug usage.

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[quote name='IsItPluggedIn' timestamp='1368402970' post='595686380']
This seams like a great idea. I wonder how many of the 1.4 million are actually committed enough to use this. Most people "fall of the wagon" because they never wanted to give up in the first place.

The statistics after this will be interesting, how many of the 1.4 million take up a different drug after the cocaine no longer works.
[/quote]

Commitment? It's a vaccine. You dose once or a couple times, and it programs the immune system to take out cocaine.

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[quote name='Growled' timestamp='1368406018' post='595686492']
I have never understood how that works. You would think decriminalization and having more access to drugs would bring about more drug usage.
[/quote]
Same thing as alcohol, 'sorry you can`t have this until you`re 21' = most under 21 year olds want it.

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[quote name='n_K' timestamp='1368406351' post='595686508']
Same thing as alcohol, 'sorry you can`t have this until you`re 21' = most under 21 year olds want it.
[/quote]

Most over 21 want it too. :D
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[quote name='Lizardslap' timestamp='1368403260' post='595686394']
I wonder how this would affect people that could need codine based pain killers in the future[/quote]

In the US cocaine is mainly been used for lacrimal duct and nasal surgery, and it's still available but not often used because of its such a strong vasoconstrictor and the risk of cardiovascular toxicity. Proparacaine, benzocaine, tetracaine, lidocaine, lignocaine, xylocaine etc. etc. are the main substitutes and they work well. IF for some reason vasoconstriction is needed diluted epinephrine can be used with them.

Kick it to the kerb.

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decriminalization will removes the 'cool' effect & bragging right of using it,
this more rooted to human psychology than reasons,
and yes decriminalization of drugs would usually lower its price.

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Maybe it will get rid of crackheads?

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As said before its a vaccine not a drug you need to take continually.

I like the idea, and it would be great if it could be replicated to other substances. Some people would benefit from this greatly, some people have definite issues with addictive substances.

As for the legalization argument, if you are going to legalize it, it needs to be controlled. Supply chains need to be controlled by the government until it is under control, but most of the people who are in favor of legalization will not accept government control.
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[quote name='Torolol' timestamp='1368407042' post='595686546']
decriminalization will removes the 'cool' effect & bragging right of using it,
this more rooted to human psychology than reasons, and yes decriminalization of drugs would usually lower its price.[/quote]

http://www.npr.org/2011/01/20/133086356/Mixed-Results-For-Portugals-Great-Drug-Experiment

[quote]When Portugal decriminalized all illegal drugs in 2000, officials hoped to reduce addiction rates and drug-related violence. Today, more users are in rehab, but drug use is on the rise, and reporter Keith O'Brien says the policy has made the problem worse.

When Portugal decriminalized all illegal drugs in 2000, officials hoped to reduce addiction rates and drug-related violence. Today, more users are in rehab, but drug use is on the rise, and reporter Keith O'Brien says the policy has made the problem worse.

Journalist Keith O'Brien describes what happened in a piece titled "Drug Experiment" of The Boston Globe, and he joins us now from member station WWNO in New Orleans. Nice to have you with us today.

Mr. KEITH O'BRIEN (Freelance Writer): Thank you, Neal. Good to be here.

CONAN: And you described Portugal's result as really a Rorschach Test -it depends who's looking.
>
[B]CONAN: So that seems to be a pretty good argument, saying, hey, this has all worked. What's on the other side of the argument?

Mr. O'BRIEN: Well, people on the other side of the argument say that, in fact, there has been an increase, and the data bears that out. In -those reporting drug use, personal drug use over the course of their lifetime has gone up about 40 to 50 percent in the last decade.

The - people reporting the use of cannabis, cocaine, heroin, amphetamines, ecstasy, you name it, it's all gone up. At the same time, there has been an increase in drug-related deaths in Portugal. So there's an argument to be made there.[/b]
>[/quote]

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[quote name='theyarecomingforyou' timestamp='1368405709' post='595686478']
It concerns me that you think it's appropriate to force such a treatment upon somebody. Forced medical treatment violates human rights and centuries of medical practice. However, such a vaccine could be offered in exchange for reduced criminal sentences and should be offered for free to anybody addicted to cocaine. Portugal has demonstrated that decriminalisation can reduce drug usage and increase the number seeking medical treatment for addiction and that is something that other countries should seriously consider, especially the US with it's incredibly draconian and racially biased drug laws.
[/quote]

I work in addictions, Ive seen the screwed up stuff this particular drug can lead to. Drive-bys in broad daylight in outside a childrens hospital for instance... Im not talking about forcing this on the guy who has 1 conviction of possessing an 8-ball in the past 5 years... Im talking about the repeat offenders who demonstrated have no regard for human welfare, blowing their government support cheques at the dealers in addition to doing petty crimes/snatching purses/B&E, and are abusing the healthcare system to avoid jailtime by claiming 'drugs made them do it' and you know its BS.. you can smell their BS a mile away and wish you could track them when they leave as you are certain nothing you done helped and they are going directly to their dealers after their mandatory 7-day rehabilitation.

I guess forced was the wrong word, heavily weighted option may be better. long jail term or 'drugs will never get you high again" Even if that was an option I know people would still take hard time over a shot ever month or 2 + probation...
just get this stuff into their arms and make cocaine useless for them is the only way you'll curb the hold this has on some people. Its death by debt or death by OD..

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[img]http://24.media.tumblr.com/tumblr_m8oiv9Q4M31qkg82fo1_500.gif[/img]
[img]http://nachodonut.files.wordpress.com/2011/01/tyrone-biggums.jpg[/img]
[img]http://cdn.hiphopwired.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/02/tyrone-biggums1.jpg[/img]
[img]http://bbsimg.ngfiles.com/1/7684000/ngbbs43cdd877a2ffa.jpg[/img]

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[quote name='Growled' timestamp='1368406018' post='595686492']


I have never understood how that works. You would think decriminalization and having more access to drugs would bring about more drug usage.
[/quote]

I think it eliminates the coolness factor....

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[quote name='srbeen' timestamp='1368449028' post='595687124']
long jail term
[/quote]

First off, thank you for being a strong individual for working with rehab patients.. That is a tough job and takes a strong person to help them..

I think jail sentences for drugs is horrible.. It cost taxpayers too much money and doesn't really solve the problem.
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[quote name='srbeen' timestamp='1368449028' post='595687124']
I work in addictions, Ive seen the screwed up stuff this particular drug can lead to. Drive-bys in broad daylight in outside a childrens hospital for instance... Im not talking about forcing this on the guy who has 1 conviction of possessing an 8-ball in the past 5 years... Im talking about the repeat offenders who demonstrated have no regard for human welfare, blowing their government support cheques at the dealers in addition to doing petty crimes/snatching purses/B&E, and are abusing the healthcare system to avoid jailtime by claiming 'drugs made them do it' and you know its BS.. you can smell their BS a mile away and wish you could track them when they leave as you are certain nothing you done helped and they are going directly to their dealers after their mandatory 7-day rehabilitation.[/quote]

If people pose a danger to society then they should be in jail; if not they should be free to live their lives. As for drug addicts, many want to be free from addiction but don't have the willpower to do so - those are the sort of people who would jump at the chance to take a vaccine for addiction. The rest simply don't want helping.

I appreciate that what some of these people do is horrific and abhorrent but I am still a firm believer in the freedom of individuals to choose their own destiny - that means honouring Do Not Resuscitate orders; letting Jehovah's Witnesses die if they choose to refuse surgery or blood transplants; letting people starve themselves to death in protest (Suffragettes, Guantanamo Bay prisoners, etc); and not forcing vaccines likes this on people who do not want them. As I said, it is far better to weight the system to make people choose to do so of their own accord - however, sentencing must still be rational. For instance, it's not appropriate to threaten the death penalty or life in prison if they refuse the vaccine.

[i]PS - Here's [url="http://www.spiegel.de/international/europe/evaluating-drug-decriminalization-in-portugal-12-years-later-a-891060.html"]an article[/url] on Portugal's decriminalisation of drugs. It's by no means a perfect solution but the reality is the war on drugs isn't working and that money would be better spent benefiting society.[/i]
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[quote name='Fus10n' timestamp='1368450162' post='595687158']
First off, thank you for being a strong individual for working with rehab patients.. That is a tough job and takes a strong person to help them..

I think jail sentences for drugs is horrible.. It cost taxpayers too much money and doesn't really solve the problem.
[/quote]

It don't, especially when the system is setup to provide help to everyone regardless of what happened (appointed attorneys, transport, food, clothes, etc). It hammers down on alcoholics that they need a $2200 interlock system installed, yet a drug user who beats a old woman into a coma for $50 is considered sick/ill from the drugs rather than a criminal, and can continue to use that same excuse to exploit the system setup to help those who really want it. It disgusts me to see the same faces over and over. in for the same thing over and over. just to repeat over and over and waste the resources. Beds are full and you find out someone who has never been in before OD'd because they couldn't get in, due to this court ordered dick whos only there to shave time off his sentence.

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[quote name='Fus10n' timestamp='1368450162' post='595687158']
I think jail sentences for drugs is horrible.. It cost taxpayers too much money and doesn't really solve the problem.
[/quote]

I agree. I don't think jail is the answer.

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