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Posted

When you think of all the advancements in medical technology, it can blow your mind. To prove that, we're bringing you the story of Brad Carter, a 39-year-old musician and actor. Carter has appeared on various TV shows, including "CSI." Carter had brain surgery recently, and you have to see it to believe it. Thanks to Vine, Twitter, and the power of the Internet, now you can.

Carter was diagnosed with Parkinson's disease in 2006. He started experiencing hand and eye tremors, which caused him to lose his ability to play the guitar. Doctors at UCLA Medical Center performed a deep brain-stimulation surgery, which involves implanting an electrode emitter to affected areas of Carter's brain. Surgeons had to awaken Carter during the surgery to make sure they were implanting the electrode emitter in the right part of his brain.

The surgery turned social when doctors in the operating room tweeted six-second Vine videos of the procedure. We watch as doctors prep his head. Once the electrodes were in place, Carter was able to write and hold a cup of water without shaking. He even sent a message to his family: "Hi mom. Hi dad. Hi Kristie."

As if by magic, Carter is also seen strumming the guitar and singing a song while doctors are still operating on him. His surgery was the 500th of its kind performed at a hospital. Doctors insist that placing the electrode emitters in Carter's brain is not a cure, but a way to control the patient's tremors and stiffness. Carter seems especially grateful to have music back in his life.

[url="http://news.yahoo.com/blogs/trending-now/extraordinary-video-man-playing-guitar-during-brain-surgery-165953137.html?vp=1"]source & video[/url]

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Posted

This is not unusual at all. Brain surgery is not painful... actually there are no pain sensors in brain tissue at all. And neurosurgeons want to know what is going on with patients while they preform surgery, so they prefer patients to be awake and doing something. Then, if there is an issue with the brain, they will know instantly through what the patient is saying or doing. I have seen this in action and, while it might be bizarre, it is standard protocol.

Barney

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Posted

Surprising there wasn't a germ issue, with the guitar there.

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Posted

There is a barrier (sterile plastic sheet) that covers the surgery area. The guitar and the rest of the man is sealed off from the surgical site.

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Posted

hey barney, that avitar picture looks like a hospital in the background

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Posted

^ Yeah, well he is a professional Nurse. ;)

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Posted

Yes, that is where I work. I am a Registered Nurse who works in the Operating Room. Been a nurse for 20 years...

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