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Earth Life Likely Came from Mars, Study Suggests

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#16 +zhiVago

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Posted 29 August 2013 - 08:27

I got the references, but wasn't it LV-426??

 

Yes, in the Alien/Aliens it was LV-426, the crash site.

 

But in the movie Prometheus, the name of the planet was LV-223. ;)




#17 HawkMan

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Posted 29 August 2013 - 08:34

Yes, in the Alien/Aliens it was LV-426, the crash site.

 

But in the movie Prometheus, the name of the planet was LV-223. ;)

 

Well it wasn't the same planet, or universe so...



#18 REM2000

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Posted 29 August 2013 - 08:42

hCEFFEB3F



#19 Darrian

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Posted 29 August 2013 - 09:32

Well it wasn't the same planet, or universe so...

It was not the same planet.  It was the same universe.



#20 Hum

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Posted 30 August 2013 - 14:48

I came from Venus :ninja:



#21 adrynalyne

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Posted 30 August 2013 - 14:53

What a load of crap.

SO what do YOU believe then?



#22 spacer

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Posted 30 August 2013 - 14:55

I read a lot of "likely"s and "probably"s in that article. There is a lot of conjecture and not a lot of hard evidence.

 

The article also uses a hypothetical, martian meteorite as the delivery system. Where did this meteorite come from? Mars is still there, and I don't see any giant chunks of it missing. So where did this meteorite come from?



#23 adrynalyne

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Posted 30 August 2013 - 14:57

I read a lot of "likely"s and "probably"s in that article. There is a lot of conjecture and not a lot of hard evidence.

 

The article also uses a hypothetical, martian meteorite as the delivery system. Where did this meteorite come from? Mars is still there, and I don't see any giant chunks of it missing. So where did this meteorite come from?

Hypotheses are part of the scientific method.  Now they need to continue studying it to prove or debunk it.



#24 Rigby

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Posted 30 August 2013 - 15:06

All the planets formed from the same cloud of materials so why does it matter?



#25 spacer

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Posted 30 August 2013 - 15:08

Hypotheses are part of the scientific method.  Now they need to continue studying it to prove or debunk it.

Yes, they are. But by definition they are unproven guesses. So why publish them? And the article specifically refers to it as "evidence" even though none of it qualifies. So it's a little misleading.



#26 Hum

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Posted 30 August 2013 - 15:12

Yes, they are. But by definition they are unproven guesses.

That describes most of Science, perfectly. ;)



#27 Astra.Xtreme

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Posted 30 August 2013 - 15:13

I'm not sure if this article has all it's information straight.  I thought it was pretty accepted that the atmosphere on Mars was destroyed about 4 billion years ago. The article says that Mars had plenty of oxygen 3 billions years ago, and that isn't true.

 

http://www.nypost.co...K2tXnTC7mETdauM

 

The oldest remains of life on Earth is from 3.8 billion years.  So I guess the story would make sense if the cataclysmic event on Mars destroyed it's atmosphere and then sent fragments towards Earth.  It seems like a very narrow window for this to occur.



#28 Growled

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Posted 30 August 2013 - 16:34

^ I think some of these guys sort make up this stuff as they go along. You know?



#29 +warwagon

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Posted 30 August 2013 - 16:38

Maybe he doesn't capitalize the names of his imaginary friends?

 

I'm pretty sure I forgot the /s :D



#30 ILikeTobacco

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Posted 30 August 2013 - 16:46

I'm not sure if this article has all it's information straight.  I thought it was pretty accepted that the atmosphere on Mars was destroyed about 4 billion years ago. The article says that Mars had plenty of oxygen 3 billions years ago, and that isn't true.

 

http://www.nypost.co...K2tXnTC7mETdauM

 

The oldest remains of life on Earth is from 3.8 billion years.  So I guess the story would make sense if the cataclysmic event on Mars destroyed it's atmosphere and then sent fragments towards Earth.  It seems like a very narrow window for this to occur.

Being destroyed and being nonexistent are two different things. Mars, to this day, still has an atmosphere, just not one that you could breathe in. Oxygen is not a requirement for life.

 

http://news.sciencem...-without-oxygen