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France threatens Google over data protection breaches


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#1 gameboy1977

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Posted 27 September 2013 - 17:31

France threatens Google over data protection breaches




#2 Growled

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Posted 27 September 2013 - 17:58

 

CNIL had asked Google to inform web users in France on how it processes their personal data and to define exactly how long they can store the information.

 

The NSA isn't going to allow Google to give out that kind of information.



#3 FloatingFatMan

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Posted 28 September 2013 - 19:52

The NSA isn't going to allow Google to give out that kind of information.

 

The NSA have bugger all say in the matter.  Google can either ante up the information, or cease doing business in France.  



#4 arachnoid

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Posted 28 September 2013 - 20:08

Sounds like a storm in a tea cup and France doing a bit of sabre rattling to me

 

 

 

CNIL said in a statement that while Google did not change its policy, the company did respond to the threat of enforcement action by contesting “the applicability of French data protection law to the services used by residents in France.”

In a statement, a Google spokeswoman said, “Our privacy policy respects European law and allows us to create simpler, more effective services. We have engaged fully with the CNIL throughout this process, and we’ll continue to do so going forward.”

 

Source



#5 theyarecomingforyou

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Posted 28 September 2013 - 20:28

The sooner the EU adopts the proposed common data protection law the better, as it is understandably difficult and time consuming for businesses to comply with the various different laws in each member country. That's not to excuse a company like Google though, as it has more than enough lawyers and has offices throughout the EU.



#6 arachnoid

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Posted 28 September 2013 - 20:45

EU 27 v rest of the world 206



#7 FloatingFatMan

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Posted 29 September 2013 - 07:19

The sooner the EU adopts the proposed common data protection law the better, as it is understandably difficult and time consuming for businesses to comply with the various different laws in each member country. That's not to excuse a company like Google though, as it has more than enough lawyers and has offices throughout the EU.

 

Our various laws are not there for the convenience of businesses.

 

 

 

What has that got to do with anything?  It's the responsibility of the company to comply with ALL laws of the nation it's doing business in.  If it can't or won't, get out.  We don't let corporations set our laws, unlike the US.



#8 theyarecomingforyou

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Posted 29 September 2013 - 11:24

Our various laws are not there for the convenience of businesses.

No, but at the moment most European data protection laws are woefully out-of-date and wildly inconsistent. It makes the EU less competitive and more expensive to operate in without providing any benefit. The proposed EU data protection laws would substantially strengthen consumer rights, particularly if the "right to be forgotten" appears in the final draft. Unfortunately it's no surprise to see the UK opposing such laws, just as it did the neonicotinoid ban - big business has too much influence over UK politics.



#9 FloatingFatMan

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Posted 29 September 2013 - 11:42

big business has too much influence over UK politics.

 

Do you have any proof of that, or are you just vapouring?

 

I have no issue with the laws being changed or updated; but until that time, businesses have to comply with the laws as they are, not as they hope them to be.



#10 theyarecomingforyou

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Posted 29 September 2013 - 11:52

Do you have any proof of that, or are you just vapouring?

You're joking, right? This is the government that had the scandal involving Rebecca Brooks and Rupert Murdoch. This is the government that has been privatising the economy on the down-low since it came into office. This is the government that rejected the neonicotinoid ban after receiving substantial donations from biotech companies. This is the government that sabotaged the Green Deal through constant delays and overly favourable terms to the financial sector. This is the government where the wealthy elite get to pay to have access to the Prime Minister to influence policies. The previous government's PFI scheme handed over huge amounts of public money to the private sector.

 

If it was for EU membership the UK wouldn't have anywhere near the same level of consumer protections or investment in more deprived areas.

 

I have no issue with the laws being changed or updated; but until that time, businesses have to comply with the laws as they are, not as they hope them to be.

And I said as much. However, there is no denying that current EU policy on data protection is wildly inconsistent and unhelpful to both businesses and consumers.



#11 FloatingFatMan

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Posted 29 September 2013 - 12:12

You're joking, right? This is the government that had the scandal involving Rebecca Brooks and Rupert Murdoch. This is the government that has been privatising the economy on the down-low since it came into office. This is the government that rejected the neonicotinoid ban after receiving substantial donations from biotech companies. This is the government that sabotaged the Green Deal through constant delays and overly favourable terms to the financial sector. This is the government where the wealthy elite get to pay to have access to the Prime Minister to influence policies. The previous government's PFI scheme handed over huge amounts of public money to the private sector.

 

If it was for EU membership the UK wouldn't have anywhere near the same level of consumer protections or investment in more deprived areas.

 

 

I see a whole lot of accusations, and not a lot of proof...

 

FYI, UK consumer protection laws are already better than the EU ones. .Why would we want WEAKER ones in force?



#12 theyarecomingforyou

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Posted 29 September 2013 - 12:29

I see a whole lot of accusations, and not a lot of proof...

I have no intention of writing a dissertation to support my points, not when the information is in the public domain and what I mentioned was just the tip of the iceberg.

 

FYI, UK consumer protection laws are already better than the EU ones. .Why would we want WEAKER ones in force?

All the analysis shows the proposed EU data protection laws to be stronger than those currently on offer. In fact most of the criticism stems from the cost of compliance, not the weakening of existing protections. But it stands to reason that a centralised EU law will provide consistency and be much easier to enforce.



#13 Growled

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Posted 30 September 2013 - 01:07

 

In a statement, a Google spokeswoman said, “Our privacy policy respects European law and allows us to create simpler, more effective services. We have engaged fully with the CNIL throughout this process, and we’ll continue to do so going forward.”

 

Isn't that what they all say?



#14 arachnoid

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Posted 30 September 2013 - 19:15

Our various laws are not there for the convenience of businesses.

 

 

 

What has that got to do with anything?  It's the responsibility of the company to comply with ALL laws of the nation it's doing business in.  If it can't or won't, get out.  We don't let corporations set our laws, unlike the US.

My contention was taken in the context of the previous statement which said it would be easier for businesses if all EU country's complied with the same regulations but its quite clear from these numbers that non-EU country's far outweigh the EU alliance.