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#1 Elliot B.

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Posted 17 November 2013 - 14:47

I have a Logitech Z506 5.1 speaker system.

 

I am unable to use the surround sound due to the layout of my room.

 

At the moment, the speakers connect to the subwoofer via. phono connectors.

 

If I buy two phono splitters and use:

  • One to connect the FL and RL speakers together
  • One to connect the FR and RR speakers together

... will there be a loss in power to each speaker?

 

I want to do it so that I have two speakers as Left and two speakers as Right.

 

Please don't suggest software to do this, everything I have found doesn't duplicate the sound out of both speakers with equal volume. The solution above, if you guys can tell me there wouldn't be a loss of power to the speakers, would be a physical solution.




#2 +BudMan

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Posted 17 November 2013 - 14:52

I am confused - what does the layout of your room have to do with using the correct connections?

Does your computer or whatever you wanting to connect this too not have 5.1 outputs?

Or you just want it to play your l and r channels out the other speakers the rear speakers? Why? Makes no sense?

And if you did want to do that - wouldn't you do that with the software that came with your 5.1 sound card, or with the device that decodes your audio?

#3 Starbuck84

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Posted 17 November 2013 - 15:00

Just to answer your main question: there will be a loss of volume / power, because your connect 2 speakers (using a splitter) to 1 output. But will this be noticeable one might ask? The only thing you might notice: you need to up the volume knob a little more.

 

While this might all go right, just listen carefully to your music the first hour or so. If all sounds ok, no worries. If you start to hear crackles or high beeps, unplug. Why, you're essentially connecting 2 speakers to 1 output, resulting in a lower impedance and some amps might not like that. Just hook it up, test and if it sounds ok, you're done. :)



#4 Neu B

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Posted 17 November 2013 - 15:02

I would not do it. It will lower the impedance of the amp. Amp might not be able to handle lower impedance, get too hot and burn up.



#5 OP Elliot B.

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Posted 17 November 2013 - 15:06

I would not do it. It will lower the impedance of the amp. Amp might not be able to handle lower impedance, get too hot and burn up.

Oh :/ Then I shan't bother.



#6 Starbuck84

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Posted 17 November 2013 - 15:12

But instead of splitting the speakers? Why not split the output of your sound card? Connecting one to the left / right and one to the rear left / rear right? Essentially putting the same signal in both inputs? No need to worry about the amp? Just a thought.



#7 OP Elliot B.

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Posted 17 November 2013 - 16:34

But instead of splitting the speakers? Why not split the output of your sound card? Connecting one to the left / right and one to the rear left / rear right? Essentially putting the same signal in both inputs? No need to worry about the amp? Just a thought.

Ah, so you mean a jack splitter instead of a phono splitter?



#8 Starbuck84

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Posted 17 November 2013 - 16:45

Ah, so you mean a jack splitter instead of a phono splitter?

Yeah, creating the same solution, but without putting extra stress on your amp. And your sound card is able to pull it off easily. :)



#9 OP Elliot B.

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Posted 17 November 2013 - 16:56

Yeah, creating the same solution, but without putting extra stress on your amp. And your sound card is able to pull it off easily. :)

I've just checked what's connected to my on-board audio:

 

Yellow, Black and Green. I believe that's "main stereo", "rear stereo" and "center/subwoofer".

 

Therefore I don't think it's possible :(

 

EDIT: And this is the back of the subwoofer:

 

eb_z506-back.jpg

 

The red and white phonos are for my Xbox 360, so I believe they're unrelated to this.

 

EDIT #2: Actually, plugging a jack splitter into the yellow port on the PC's on-board sound card and connecting the yellow and black jacks into it would work, I think? :)



#10 Eric

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Posted 17 November 2013 - 17:03

Just put the splitter on the green if you only need stereo.

#11 OP Elliot B.

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Posted 17 November 2013 - 17:04

Just put the splitter on the green if you only need stereo.

The green cable that's connected to the sound card is "subwoofer". I believe you mean the yellow one ("main stereo")?

 

I'll try it now :)

 

EDIT: It works, but my center (not important) and subwoofer (important) no longer work as I have to set Windows to Stereo and not 5.1 (or I'd lose some audio in some of my programs/games).



#12 Daniel F.

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Posted 17 November 2013 - 17:15

Thread cleaned of OT responses (Y)



#13 Neu B

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Posted 17 November 2013 - 21:13

You can split the front output from your sound card with this or equivalent
http://www.amazon.co...splitter stereo

One line will plug in to where your green one is plugged in on the sub, and the other will plug in where the black one is (the one below the green one). You won't be using the rear output from your sound card.

So basically you are sending front R/L signal to both front and rear R/L speakers.

#14 Starbuck84

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Posted 18 November 2013 - 08:41

The green cable that's connected to the sound card is "subwoofer". I believe you mean the yellow one ("main stereo")?

 

I'll try it now :)

 

EDIT: It works, but my center (not important) and subwoofer (important) no longer work as I have to set Windows to Stereo and not 5.1 (or I'd lose some audio in some of my programs/games).

What sound card do you use? With some brands it's possible to use the subwoofer output, even when the configuration is set to stereo. Creating a 2.1 setup. In your case, due to the jack splitter essentially a 4.1 setup.



#15 srbeen

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Posted 18 November 2013 - 21:31

I have a Logitech Z506 5.1 speaker system.

 

I am unable to use the surround sound due to the layout of my room.

 

At the moment, the speakers connect to the subwoofer via. phono connectors.

 

If I buy two phono splitters and use:

  • One to connect the FL and RL speakers together
  • One to connect the FR and RR speakers together

... will there be a loss in power to each speaker?

 

I want to do it so that I have two speakers as Left and two speakers as Right.

 

Please don't suggest software to do this, everything I have found doesn't duplicate the sound out of both speakers with equal volume. The solution above, if you guys can tell me there wouldn't be a loss of power to the speakers, would be a physical solution.

 

To answer your question bluntly, yes. The electronics behind that, each speaker appears as a resistive load to the sub. The sub is setup to output the maximum power for the speaker, based on its known resistance (usually 4-16ohm per speaker) since its an all-in-one its doubtful this is explained anywhere to you.

 

When you take 1 output signal destined for one speaker with a load of say 8ohm, and you parallel that output with another speaker of equal load, your sub sees both these speakers as 4ohm and thus skews the maximum power output, lowering your possible output wattage and increasing your current which could burn your cones/coil out. this is unlikley unless you listen to crackling horrible music at terribly high volumes.

 

Knowing this, try it and see what happens. It'll work, but if you crank it up you'll probably notice the speakers will be clipping sooner than without the splitter. Ideally you should have a 4 channel amp and ditch the logitech setup all together.





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