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#16 firey

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Posted 31 December 2013 - 00:11

pretty sure the follows the same lines as china.  People will watch others die out of fear of being sued if they die anyways.




#17 Hardcore Til I Die

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Posted 31 December 2013 - 00:13

Wow, how callous can people be to say that "the pharmacy did the right thing by not providing life saving medicine"?

 

It boggles the mind!

 

People are looking at it with cold, calm logic; something that they wouldn't do if they were in the same situation.

 

You always see armchair doctors, lawyers, scientists etc. commenting on things they don't understand. This is no different. 



#18 +snaphat (Myles Landwehr)

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Posted 31 December 2013 - 00:14

Regardless of whether the girl and family weren't prepared when they should have been, it is still a tragedy. It's kind of ridiculous that there are people who are just like "I would have done better." Because, as we know everyone here is perfectly responsible in ever situation and carries around exactly what they need in all circumstances. I know I have never forgotten my inhaler at any point my life :no:.

 

The reality of course is that people aren't always prepared or responsible when they should be and those who are acting like they are are basically misjudging their diligence and on a high horse.



#19 greenwizard88

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Posted 31 December 2013 - 00:14

Depending on the situation, the pharmacist may be liable anyway. I know in America a nurse who refuses to help can be liable.

 

Here's the oath of a pharmacist.

 

Oath of a Pharmacist
 
 

The revised Oath was adopted by the AACP House of Delegates in July 2007 and has been approved by the American Pharmacists Association. AACP member institutions should plan to use the revised Oath of a Pharmacist during the 2008-09 academic year and with spring 2009 graduates.

"I promise to devote myself to a lifetime of service to others through the profession of pharmacy. In fulfilling this vow:

  • I will consider the welfare of humanity and relief of suffering my primary concerns.
  • I will apply my knowledge, experience, and skills to the best of my ability to assure optimal outcomes for my patients.
  • I will respect and protect all personal and health information entrusted to me.
  • I will accept the lifelong obligation to improve my professional knowledge and competence.
  • I will hold myself and my colleagues to the highest principles of our profession’s moral, ethical and legal conduct.
  • I will embrace and advocate changes that improve patient care.
  • I will utilize my knowledge, skills, experiences, and values to prepare the next generation of pharmacists.

I take these vows voluntarily with the full realization of the responsibility with which I am entrusted by the public.”

 


#20 Hardcore Til I Die

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Posted 31 December 2013 - 00:15

 

Depending on the situation, the pharmacist may be liable anyway. I know in America a nurse who refuses to help can be liable.

 

Here's the oath of a pharmacist.

 

Oath of a Pharmacist
 
 

The revised Oath was adopted by the AACP House of Delegates in July 2007 and has been approved by the American Pharmacists Association. AACP member institutions should plan to use the revised Oath of a Pharmacist during the 2008-09 academic year and with spring 2009 graduates.

"I promise to devote myself to a lifetime of service to others through the profession of pharmacy. In fulfilling this vow:

  • I will consider the welfare of humanity and relief of suffering my primary concerns.
  • I will apply my knowledge, experience, and skills to the best of my ability to assure optimal outcomes for my patients.
  • I will respect and protect all personal and health information entrusted to me.
  • I will accept the lifelong obligation to improve my professional knowledge and competence.
  • I will hold myself and my colleagues to the highest principles of our profession’s moral, ethical and legal conduct.
  • I will embrace and advocate changes that improve patient care.
  • I will utilize my knowledge, skills, experiences, and values to prepare the next generation of pharmacists.

I take these vows voluntarily with the full realization of the responsibility with which I am entrusted by the public.”

 

 

 

This happened in Dublin, Ireland, so probably doesn't have anything to do with the AACP. Forgive me if I'm wrong! 



#21 n_K

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Posted 31 December 2013 - 00:21

Omission/negligence is not a defence to many crimes, so doctors run the risk of being charged with all sorts of criminal offences every time they treat somebody; especially surgeons. If someone dies as a result of your negligence you can be guilty of manslaughter on the grounds of negligence. 

 

It comes with the territory of the job. It doesn't mean doctors should hesitate and ponder over everything they do, because people will die if they're not swift and efficient. 

 

If the pharmacist realised the severity of the situation, they should have tried to do something, consequences be damned. 

So you're saying you'd happily give someone something which might not even help them with the consequences being you are struck off from ever working in the medical field again (and it'll follow you around to every job you apply for too), and potentially being imprisoned for giving unprescribed drugs to people/manslaughter and the person possibly dying anyway? (Bearing in mind if you do not have a valid prescription for a drug and have it on you, depending upon what it is, it can be classed the same as recreational drugs in classes A-C)
Well, good luck in life if you take that attitude.



#22 xendrome

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Posted 31 December 2013 - 00:23

Not from what I'm aware, when you see shows following emergencies in A&E, there are always doctors there checking everything all of the time because they know if they get it wrong, they're liable, even if it's an emergency.

 

Doctors fall under specific rules and have to carry specific insurance, a normal person rendering aid doesn't have an obligation like a Doctor does.



#23 MorganX

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Posted 31 December 2013 - 00:24

Regardless of whether the girl and family weren't prepared when they should have been, it is still a tragedy. It's kind of ridiculous that there are people who are just like "I would have done better." Because, as we know everyone here is perfectly responsible in ever situation and carries around exactly what they need in all circumstances. I know I have never forgotten my inhaler at any point my life :no:.

 

The reality of course is that people aren't always prepared or responsible when they should be and those who are acting like they are are basically misjudging their diligence and on a high horse.

 

I agree with you in a general sense. The whole situation is unfortunate. But I would hope most parents would absolutely be prepared before going out to eat with their child with this severe of a problem, and would even taste any sauce in a Chinese restaurant to make sure it wasn't peanut.

 

I don't "blame" the parents and without knowing exactly what the employee saw in the pharmacy, I'm not "blaming" them either. I personally would have given it to here if she was there gasping. I would not have given it to the mother if the  person was not right there. I think the discussion is only taking this tone because if we're looking for someone to blame, people are pointing out there's plenty of options.



#24 n_K

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Posted 31 December 2013 - 00:24

Doctors fall under specific rules and have to carry specific insurance, a normal person rendering aid doesn't have an obligation like a Doctor does.

You do know what a pharmacist is, right?

A pharmacist can dispense what is on a presciption which is signed and validated by a doctor for prescription-only medications (adrenaline is such a medication) but can also (at their own discretion) allow some pharmacist-only medications to be dispensed (such as stronger cough medications etc.)

A pharmacist does NOT have the power to write a prescription or dispense prescription only medication without a valid prescription, that is highly illegal under any circumstances.



#25 seta-san

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Posted 31 December 2013 - 00:34

Why was it necessary to point out that the pharmacist was male?

#26 Hardcore Til I Die

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Posted 31 December 2013 - 00:37

So you're saying you'd happily give someone something which might not even help them with the consequences being you are struck off from ever working in the medical field again (and it'll follow you around to every job you apply for too), and potentially being imprisoned for giving unprescribed drugs to people/manslaughter and the person possibly dying anyway? (Bearing in mind if you do not have a valid prescription for a drug and have it on you, depending upon what it is, it can be classed the same as recreational drugs in classes A-C)
Well, good luck in life if you take that attitude.

 

Having read more about it, it looks like Adrenaline isn't suitable for everyone. I was of the misguided impression that it could help everyone. The NHS website says Adrenaline is only prescribed by doctors when they know the patient's full medical history. 



#27 siah1214

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Posted 31 December 2013 - 01:03

Having read more about it, it looks like Adrenaline isn't suitable for everyone. I was of the misguided impression that it could help everyone. The NHS website says Adrenaline is only prescribed by doctors when they know the patient's full medical history. 

Epinephrine can kill or cause permanent damage. Another reason not to give it to any Tom Dick and Harry that comes in off the street demanding it.

 

Wow, how callous can people be to say that "the pharmacy did the right thing by not providing life saving medicine"?

 

It boggles the mind!p 

Hey how much experience do you have with food allergies and medicines to treat them?   Glad you're such an expert on the subject, now enlighten us about how we're all *******s. 



#28 +warwagon

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Posted 31 December 2013 - 01:10

Hasn't anyone watched ER, if you are extremely desperate just stab her in the heck with a pen and give her a poor mans tracheotomy



#29 Anibal P

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Posted 31 December 2013 - 01:13

I bet most of you defending the scum "pharmacist" would be throwing "righteous" tantrums if the pharmacists was refusing to pass out the morning after pill or Plan B



#30 Buttus

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Posted 31 December 2013 - 01:18

This is a good example of "damned if you do, damned if you don't"