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Ford Taurus Oil Change Warning


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#16 T3X4S

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Posted 12 July 2014 - 10:31

That's why you isolate the high-power/engine's components (pull out relative fuses) and connect a small 12V (1Ah) SLA battery across the main battery's terminals (to be disconnected) while servicing (to maintain power to the electronics).

 

I wonder if there's a market for (cheaper) cars without electronics.

No, thats why you take it to the dealership & let them worry about it ;)

All of that gibberish stuff you mentioned sounds like the typical linux support forum.

Newb asks question
Veteran always starts with "all you have to do is..." then gives lengthy, confusing, & vague process that only confuses said newb.
Newb doesnt understand answer
Newb gets frustrated and deletes linux from computer
Newb vows to never use linux again

of course.... I wouldnt know about this... it happened to.... some guy.




#17 Lizardslap

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Posted 12 July 2014 - 10:56

ya that sounds like something ford would do. I helped a buddy with his ranger he had intermittent no start caused by what looked like a shim or some crap on the starter no it was how they grounded the whole car through that plate on the starter and bolt in it very dumb just like there exaust plug idea

 

never had a ford they didn't do weird stuff on



#18 cork1958

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Posted 12 July 2014 - 11:34

For something as simple (yeah, right) as an oil change, there is almost no sense in doing it your self, now a days, with as cheap as the quick lube places are.

 

Most smaller Fords, have ALWAYS been absolutely ridiculous to work on, as are most smaller cars now a days.



#19 Aheer.R.S.

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Posted 12 July 2014 - 15:27

I hate that car manufacturers do that, to force customers to take the car back to the main dealers, even for somethimg simple like an oil and filter change.

#20 SpeedyTheSnail

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Posted 12 July 2014 - 15:35

I hate that car manufacturers do that, to force customers to take the car back to the main dealers, even for somethimg simple like an oil and filter change.

My friend had a 2008~ Jeep Grand Cherokee while we were in the military (He recently sold it). He changed the brakes, but had to pay $100 to reset the brake pressure, otherwise it would keep giving a brake PSI warning.



#21 farmeunit

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Posted 12 July 2014 - 15:51

They didnt used to be - only recently has Hyundai built decent cars


I know people that bought theirs several years ago and have had great luck with them.

#22 Aheer.R.S.

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Posted 12 July 2014 - 16:34

My friend had a 2008~ Jeep Grand Cherokee while we were in the military (He recently sold it). He changed the brakes, but had to pay $100 to reset the brake pressure, otherwise it would keep giving a brake PSI warning.

That's the thing, there are lots of people who know exactly how to do advanced maintenance on their cars, but the cars are now made to be hooked up into a diagnostic machine, (one of the reason I prefer older cars, no sensors to fail or give false signals due to not being reset)

sorry, just venting about the rip off main dealers....



#23 OP Gerowen

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Posted 12 July 2014 - 17:12

That's the thing, there are lots of people who know exactly how to do advanced maintenance on their cars, but the cars are now made to be hooked up into a diagnostic machine, (one of the reason I prefer older cars, no sensors to fail or give false signals due to not being reset)

sorry, just venting about the rip off main dealers....

First time I changed the oil in our '06 Ford Explorer, I was not aware that there was a computerized oil timer.  It started flashing "Oil Change Recommended" a few weeks after I changed it and I had to look up how to reset it.  Luckily it did not require connecting to the computer with a code reader, you could do it through the menus on the computer on the dash, but things are getting more and more complicated any more.  It's one reason that I've clung to my old 1999 Dodge Dakota.  It has a computer that operates the trip meters, odometer, fuel injectors, O2 sensors and a few other things, but it is not nearly as embedded in the car as it is in newer vehicles.  I will admit though, it is handy to have all those sensors available.  On several occasions I've had a turning lamp go out on the Explorer for some reason throughout the course of an evening when I wasn't driving, and when I got in the next morning the computer would tell me to check it, or to check tire pressure (usually caused by cold weather causing the tires to contract) or that a door isn't quite shut completely.  It's nice to have the car helping keep an eye on things, but I'm really not a fan of the computer actually being in charge of controlling mechanical parts like the gas pedal, it makes me nervous having had one bad experience already, so I'll cling to my older truck as long as I can.  When and if it throws a rod I'll replace it, but I know how to replace valve seals, pistons and piston rings and things of that nature, so I'll keep it running until the frame rusts out from under it or the head/block cracks.

 

Interesting. So the solenoid's positive terminal is connected directly to the battery's, and the negative side is what is switched through a relay? I doubt it. There should have been no power on the positive terminal. As mentioned, all components are usually grounded via the chassis (so should the solenoid).

The end result is that it was positively charged, so touching it with a metal filter wrench that was also contacting the negatively charged oil filter/engine caused a short.  I have no reason to lie about it.  If you look at the solenoid in the picture, there is a 3rd wire (white with red stripe) connected about halfway down the side of the solenoid.  I'm guessing that operates an internal relay on the solenoid itself, but I'm not sure.



#24 T3X4S

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Posted 12 July 2014 - 17:48

I know people that bought theirs several years ago and have had great luck with them.

...and your point is ?