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Newbie C++ Help


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#1 Vi3tboi911

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Posted 13 April 2002 - 00:47

Ok, I got inspired today to learn a programing language. I want to learn C++ but I am sitting here with no clue on earth on where to start. Can anyone give me links to newbie tutorials and sites? If you can, please state any tips that you have for me, thanks!


#2 Goalie_CA

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Posted 13 April 2002 - 00:54

[edit] wouldn't be bad to make this a sticky thread, so others may be able to use it without me repeating myself. This is a very common question here.[/edit]



if you don't have a compiler (to make .exe) go to http://www.bloodshed.../dev/index.html download version 4, version 5 is a buggy beta. if you do dl ver.5, then update .exe using cvs at sourceforge.



As for books go, the best one is "The c++ programming language" by Bjarne Stroustup (the inventer of c++) is the best. Itis one of those books that from a beginner to Linus Torvalds (linux guy) and developpers use.



edit: the sites below all helped me in some way or another. First you should learn c programming, then move on to c++ and win32api and other api's.



http://www.cplusplus.com/doc/tutorial/ This site covers a lot! I learned a lot of Object Oriented Programming from here.

http://www.cplusplus.com/ref/ This is a handy site for beginners. This has examples and instructions for many standard library functions.

http://www.sgi.com/tech/stl/ This is handy resource. Most of functions show prototypes and explenations for all of STL.

http://www.allegro.cc This has an easy to use complete game programming library. It's well evolved and used. It supports directx hardware accel through its functions.

http://www.sourceforge.net This is for those of you interrested in developping open source, giving feedback, bug reporting, latest builds, and complete code of some of your favorite apps... and much much more.

http://oopweb.com/CPP/Files/CPP.html This has a list of many tutorials and other resources.

http://www.msdn.microsoft.com A developer's ultimate resource.

http://www.winprog.org/tutorial The best site for learning windows programming. The guy set out to make it easy and quick. I think he certainly achieved his goal.

http://www.cprogramm...m/tutorial.html another c tutorial

http://www.research....s/homepage.html The inventors home page.

#3 Prasanth

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Posted 13 April 2002 - 01:25

Originally posted by Goalie_CA

http://www.cprogramm...m/tutorial.html another c tutorial


lol this was c++ tutor when i last visited:P

#4 OP Vi3tboi911

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Posted 13 April 2002 - 01:34

[edit]wouldn't be bad to make this a sticky thread, so others may be able to use it without me repeating myself. This is a very common question here.[/edit]




I support this

#5 Goalie_CA

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Posted 13 April 2002 - 01:35

Thanks for making it sticky!!!

prasanth16: its all the same :p

#6 cplusplus

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Posted 13 April 2002 - 12:46

Learning C++ will be one of the best moves you ever make. However, before you dulge into this highly object powered, versitile and extremely complex language, it is important to understand the constituent language that powers it, you guessed it, C.

C, although tedeous and procedural, will provide you a basis on which to build further knowledge of the language. I started C when I was 12 and it was the first programming language I ever used. When I seriously started thinking about making the transition from C to C++, I was a little worried at the same position you are in now - however, I soon got over it.

There are some really good books you can find on both C and C++ - i;d suggest getting maybe 1 or 2 books on C and then focusing on C++. I have a book called C by example which is a great book for people who want a book that really explains stuff in a simplistic manner. There is no degree of complexity in the book though, which may become a problem when you start to want to explore a little further.

One of the best books I have read is The C++ Programming Language by Bjourne Stoustrap (the inventor and creator of C++). It is very complex though in the majority of the book and so I wouldnt recommend it to start of with.

In total, I have 6 books:

- C by example - Great for beginners in C

- Advanced C - More focused on the complex side of C

- C++ Primer Plus - Excellent book, teaches you the core of C++ but doesn't actually go into the VCL

- C++ Builder How-To - Ranges from Intermediate to Advanced in a question/answer format

- Sam's Teach yourself C++ Builder 3 in 21 days - good book for the basics of the VCL but assumes you have a knowledge of C++

- C++ Builder 4 Unleashed - very complex overall and is focused on COM server, MIDAS servers, database and the like.



If I were you, I would take around 2 to 3 months to familarise yourself with C, then move on to C++.

If you need any help, send me an e-mail or a personal message an i'll see what I can do.

#7 OP Vi3tboi911

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Posted 14 April 2002 - 01:17

At first, I didn't really though many people would reply, Thanks. First, I think I am going to get started with C then move on to C++ and maybe create my first program(thinking too far ahead). Oh yeah, I am also 13 and I figure this is the best time to learn since I am yuong and I will get materials better. Again, Thanks for everything.

#8 cplusplus

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Posted 18 April 2002 - 04:52

No worries. Like I said though, if I were you I wouldn't take too much time on C - it's an older language now and is primarily used for DOS applications. You will find the transition between C and C++ easier though if you take the time to familiarise yourself with C. Are you going to use Borland's C and C++ languages or Microsoft's Visual C++ Language?

#9 DeathLace

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Posted 18 April 2002 - 04:58

Vi3tboi911 if you don't mind spending a little cash to buy a intro book to C++ try "A Guide To Programming in C++" by Tim Corica, Beth Brown and Bruce Presley

Published by: Lawrenceville Press



When I started to learn C++ I used this book in school, a great book that will really get you going, very easy to learn from too.

#10 Kieran

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Posted 22 May 2002 - 17:22

Ive been programming in pascal and delphi for years and am just muving over to C, C++. Which is better, visual C++ or c++ builder??



thanks

Kieran

#11 azcodemonkey

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Posted 22 May 2002 - 19:08

It depends. VC++ 7 seems to have caught up on standards so I can't complain about that. ;) VC is great for programming anything ATL/COM or MFC. Builder is great, too. Its component architecture, VCL, is the best, and it is very easy to learn. Well, I thought it was easier than MFC or COM, but I'm sure there are others that prefer the MS way. BCB 6 has good standard support, as well. Their template library is also open source. http://www.stlport.org.



I'm sure you'll find that VC is the preferred tool in most workplaces. The only thing I really like about VC in total is the IDE. Although, with version 7, I'm finding less things to complain about... but it still doesn't support VCL! :p

#12 Kieran

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Posted 22 May 2002 - 20:51

thanks for that. I bought a copy of BCB when I started to think about coding in C++ as I loved Delphi so much. From what I have seen though, I think I prefer VC. I suppose I just need to sit down with each one and spend some time with them. Its just awkward because I want to love BCB but we have VC at uni where I have to demo all my work etc so I really have to use that. Basically I think Ill be forced to get VC. I did aquire a copy of VS a while ago but it messed up my computer. I may try it again and hope.

#13 pctuk

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Posted 23 May 2002 - 09:48

What's the difference between the Bloodshed compiler, Visual C++ and Borland's? I am a total newbie (I know pascal and bits of Delphi though) to C++ so please bear with me :) Is Bloodshed ok?

#14 pagal

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Posted 23 May 2002 - 15:40

LOL, that's the book they use in almost all the schools in toronto. My old school too!!!





Originally posted by DeathLace

Vi3tboi911 if you don't mind spending a little cash to buy a intro book to C++ try "A Guide To Programming in C++" by Tim Corica, Beth Brown and Bruce Presley

Published by: Lawrenceville Press



When I started to learn C++ I used this book in school, a great book that will really get you going, very easy to learn from too.



#15 invalid

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Posted 18 July 2002 - 01:32

I’ve been programming since I was in 5th grade (yep I was like 11 or 12 when I started HTML). I learned HTML and all the things that went along with that (css, ssi, java script, xhtml, etc.), and then I started to learn perl, but abandoned that for PHP and MYSQL. After about 8 months with PHP I started to learn C++ and it was so easy for me. PHP taught me the basic syntax and all I had to do was learn the more advanced features. Also I highly recommend NOT learning C before C++, it'll just confuse you. So here's the order.



1) HTML and occupying languages (css, javascript (<-- just a little), etc.)

2)PHP and Mysql

3) C++



Don't jump into a high level language to quickley starts slow...



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