Analyst most worried about Zuckerberg's hoodie for Facebook IPO

The biggest story currently surrounding Facebook's impending IPO isn't the fact that it could garner an astounding (and record-setting) $100 billion market valuation, but the fact that Mark Zuckerberg likes to wear hoodies. Who knew? Well, besides everyone that knows anything about Zuckerberg or anyone who saw The Social Network.

Zuckerberg, Facebook's founder and CEO, showed up for a meeting with potential investors donning his trademark attire, including the aforementioned hoodie. This led Michael Pachter, an analyst for Wedbush Securities, to tell Bloomberg that Zuckerberg's attire is a "mark of immaturity." Pachter went on to say that Zuckerberg is "well-suited to be the chief product officer, the chief user-experience officer, to manage the design of the user interface, [and] to decide every feature that goes in," implying that the analyst doesn't think Zuckerberg is fit to be Facebook's chief executive.

Pachter chastises Zuckerberg for the fact that "he’s going to be [himself]," but isn't that the point? Why would investors want Facebook's stock if Zuckerberg was going to be anything less than the genius that founded the company and realizes what consumers want, sometimes even before they realize it themselves? 

While Pachter still recommends buying Facebook's stock when it's publicly available, the fact that he thinks Zuckerberg shouldn't be the chief executive is odd. Zuckerberg has surrounded himself with people who excel in areas he doesn't, such as COO Sheryl Sandberg, who implemented Facebook's monetization strategy (a strategy that many social networks have emulated). So even if Zuckerberg may not be in a situation to handle everything regarding Facebook's business, he clearly knows his weaknesses and is willing to cede power to those who know more about particular business areas, which is one of the primary tasks of a chief executive.

Report a problem with article
Previous Story

Box to launch Windows 8 Metro app

Next Story

Windows 8 chkdsk utility plans detailed

55 Comments

Commenting is disabled on this article.

Mature people dress up in suits because immature masses judge others' social status by dress. Zuckerberg have enough money already so he can opt-out from participating in this pretentious role-playing.

It Sounds more to me like they are looking for an excuse to replace him with someone else when the stock goes public so that they can then make more money from it, probably by tearing the company apart and selling off bits

I've met just as many morons in expensive suits as I have in hoodies. The age-old cliche still rings true: Clothes do not make the man.

It's disgusting that mainstream news sources still quote Michael Pachter, as he is a complete hack who's opinions have been proven wrong on so many occasions. Bloomberg would do better to interview a random guy in the street.

How many Billions is this analysts company worth then? Oh wait, it isn't.

If Zuckerberg turns up in a hoody then so be it, he knows what he is doing and is absolutely the person to CEO his company.
This analyst sounds like he is trying to justify his wage as an analyst rather than coming up with any hard facts.

It's just clothes and people shouldn't be so judgemental.

Okay it might not be considered professional, but if I was as rich as him and people turned down a deal because of how I dress then I wouldn't want to do business with them anyway

thommcg said,
You know who doesn't wear a hoodie? Yahoo's CEO.

it would be funny if Yahoo became awesome when they hire a CEO with a hoodie.

I'm sure this will just make him want to wear one even more. The only immature thing to do was to attack the wealthiest man on the planet just because of his choice of clothes.

He can wear what he wants, but perception is everything and there are investors that will snub Facebook because he doesn't dress properly. He doesn't need to wear a custom fitted $5000+ suit, but a hoodie isn't proper work attire.

My boss (who is awesome) wears a hoodie and everyone laughs about it. However, If there is an important meeting or client, he'll be dressed up in a sport coat or something acceptable. Frankly, while my office is lax in our dress code and we wear business casual and have casual Fridays, I *wish* we would dress up a little bit more. Dressing nice seem to be a lost art.

To quote a Simpsons episode, "That's the problem with first impressions. You only get one of them."

Michael Jordan, when asked why he wore a suit after every game responded along the lines that some kid could have paid his hard earned money and this might be the first or only time they see him, so he should come off as looking professional.

A hood with torn off sleeves never stopped Bill Belichick from appearing in seven Super Bowls and winning five of them (three as head coach).

"I went to business school and at the end of my 2 year course, I had only learnt that I need to wear suits to meetings, have a confident handshake and talk with a big smile on my face."

Meh, sell outs.

Stay true to yourself Mark!

Meh. People complained about Steve jobs attire too, and go take a look at their stock performance. Don't think investors cared too much.

hagjohn said,
When you are courting Wall Street, you need to dress the part. Wonder how many millions that hoodie just cost him.

None, I bet. If Wall Street's seriously worried about him doing things the way he's been doing, then I'd question their logic (certainly not like they haven't been wrong before...).

hagjohn said,
When you are courting Wall Street, you need to dress the part. Wonder how many millions that hoodie just cost him.

As if Wallstreet cares about anything but money...

I'm glad we have young CEOs who are pushing outside of the stereotype.

Where was this guy bagging Steve Jobs for wearing a turtleneck, jeans and joggers?

Does anyone actually take Pachter seriously? He's the one who's always spouting his mouth off about the video game industry, and is typically wrong about that too.

TheSpiderX said,
Does anyone actually take Pachter seriously? He's the one who's always spouting his mouth off about the video game industry, and is typically wrong about that too.

He's an analyst. 'Nuff said I guess?

GS:mac

Well, yes he is a successful owner of a company that is worth billions BUT this company isn't exactly the most "mature" place. The thing is, he is smart, owns a company BUT he is entering a business world where it is right and proper to wear a suit, when in Rome springs to mind.

Not to say he is wrong, I don't know mark but he seems to be the sort of bloke who doesn't care what others think as long as it works out for him.

Auzeras said,
Well, yes he is a successful owner of a company that is worth billions BUT this company isn't exactly the most "mature" place. The thing is, he is smart, owns a company BUT he is entering a business world where it is right and proper to wear a suit, when in Rome springs to mind.

Not to say he is wrong, I don't know mark but he seems to be the sort of bloke who doesn't care what others think as long as it works out for him.

Kind of reminds me of a certain Apple exec . . .

All well and good "being yourself", great for him to wear a hoodie. But naive to assume it wouldn't cause some form of "Is he mature enough" response. He's now dealing with an "old boys network" when it comes to this amount of money!

nik louch said,
All well and good "being yourself", great for him to wear a hoodie. But naive to assume it wouldn't cause some form of "Is he mature enough" response. He's now dealing with an "old boys network" when it comes to this amount of money!

So what.

I'm glad he stands up to it.

Screw that conformity sh**.

GS:mac

srprimeaux said,
Give me a guy/gal in a hoodie who knows what they're doing than a guy/gal in a suit who doesn't.

Even the suit with skills will probably fall through with me.
Why? Because I feel more comfortable around people who don't try to raise themselves be wearing expensive suits!

Well, of cause it depends on the individual people, but if I had to judge based on skill and wardrobe alone, then hoodie wins always!

GS:mac

Is Zuck really "immature" if his company is worth 100 BILLION dollars?

No, I didn't think so either.

Raa said,
Is Zuck really "immature" if his company is worth 100 BILLION dollars?

No, I didn't think so either.


True, I'd have thought he makes enough year on year that he doesn't really have to prove anything.

Freaking American corporate society and its mislead beliefs that the simple attire of a person has a big factor in his/her ability to run a corporation. People need to understand one thing: the technological industry isn't what the other industries are: yes, Mark Zuckerberg is immature here, and those are the kind of people who run at the top of this industry.

Apparently the old "business" world is not yet ready for people from the age of intelligence without corporate bullcrap...

PlogCF said,
Freaking American corporate society and its mislead beliefs that the simple attire of a person has a big factor in his/her ability to run a corporation. People need to understand one thing: the technological industry isn't what the other industries are: yes, Mark Zuckerberg is immature here, and those are the kind of people who run at the top of this industry.

Apparently the old "business" world is not yet ready for people from the age of intelligence without corporate bullcrap...

This, albeit I think he's not immature, just not wanting to conform to stuff he doesn't agree to and clearly he luckily doesn't have to.

If you really judge him based on his non-existent suit, well then, I laugh about your loss of possibly great business possibilities that man could offer you.
Yeah, actually, that's awesome: FALL by your prejudices and sick way of thinking, objecting individuality and non-conformity.

Glassed Silver:mac

I've always found it daft that people judge others and their capabilities over what they wear. As long as it's clean and isn't offensive (foul language, rude images) what god damn business is it if they don't dress in an uptight business suit.

Edrick Smith said,
I've always found it daft that people judge others and their capabilities over what they wear. As long as it's clean and isn't offensive (foul language, rude images) what god damn business is it if they don't dress in an uptight business suit.

Yeah, agreed. Since when does Zuckerberg's hoodie indicate he doesn't know what he's doing? That's the most reductive argument ever. I think he's already proven he's capable of handling the company.

Anthony Tosie said,

Yeah, agreed. Since when does Zuckerberg's hoodie indicate he doesn't know what he's doing? That's the most reductive argument ever. I think he's already proven he's capable of handling the company.

This so much.

Zuckerberg, wear it with pride and shove it to them!

GS:mac

Edrick Smith said,
I've always found it daft that people judge others and their capabilities over what they wear. As long as it's clean and isn't offensive (foul language, rude images) what god damn business is it if they don't dress in an uptight business suit.

I agree, at work everyone I work with dresses usually in Dress pants and a nice shirt. However I wear hoodies, jeans, skate shoes, and a ball cap. No one questions what I wear, and I am one of the most liked people. I am a software developer where I work, so it's not like I have some out of the picture job.

firey said,

I agree, at work everyone I work with dresses usually in Dress pants and a nice shirt. However I wear hoodies, jeans, skate shoes, and a ball cap. No one questions what I wear, and I am one of the most liked people. I am a software developer where I work, so it's not like I have some out of the picture job.


If you are the software developer, nobody likes you because you programmed all the bugs... I mean features...

ILikeTobacco said,

If you are the software developer, nobody likes you because you programmed all the bugs... I mean features...

Yea, to each their own, what I can undocumented features, they call bugs and request I remove them.

Edrick Smith said,
I've always found it daft that people judge others and their capabilities over what they wear. As long as it's clean and isn't offensive (foul language, rude images) what god damn business is it if they don't dress in an uptight business suit.

Because it's classy. When you invest your money into a business you don't sit down and get to know the guy behind it, you just get that appearance. Your more likely to feel more trusting in a guy who dresses up and seems to know what he is doing, and less likely from someone who knows what they are doing, but doesn't show it. Appearance is everything in this world. Sadly.

Edrick Smith said,
I've always found it daft that people judge others and their capabilities over what they wear. As long as it's clean and isn't offensive (foul language, rude images) what god damn business is it if they don't dress in an uptight business suit.

Wait, aren't you just judging people who wear "uptight" business suits, then?

Frankly, the 'look' of being well-dressed is an expression of a number of things, whether maturity, taking your work seriously, or taking that extra step to say "I don't just work for my company, I represent it."

Half of the Y chromosomes on the internet will happily join in discussions on why a well-grown beard is a symbol of their masculinity. Is it childish? Yeah, of course, it's no better than a 14 year old bragging about how his armpit hair makes him a man. But they still do it, because guys want to somehow visibly showcase their ascension to adulthood.

You can run around dressing like a middle schooler all you want, that's fine, it's comfortable, and some positions (ie., software engineers) aren't client-facing and don't HAVE to look nice every day. You probably still have some habit or element of style that you've made a conscious decision to maintain because you feel it separates you from your past immature self.

For others, that conscious decision plays a larger role in their career and image. That anyone would mock it only betrays their attempt to look 'above' anything at all.

Edited by Joshie, May 10 2012, 6:01am :

xXgreatestever said,

Because it's classy. When you invest your money into a business you don't sit down and get to know the guy behind it, you just get that appearance. Your more likely to feel more trusting in a guy who dresses up and seems to know what he is doing, and less likely from someone who knows what they are doing, but doesn't show it. Appearance is everything in this world. Sadly.

Bingo. His attire is unprofessional for this type of meeting. He's not running a 5-person start-up anymore, so it time to grow up and dress like a big boy with decorum when it's appropriate. What he wears in day-to-day operations is another thing altogether.

Edrick Smith said,
I've always found it daft that people judge others and their capabilities over what they wear. As long as it's clean and isn't offensive (foul language, rude images) what god damn business is it if they don't dress in an uptight business suit.

It's more likely they are just uncomfortable with someone who looks like a kid who still craps his pants running a company. There's a time and place for casual dress, and it's not at an investors' meeting. This probably raised plenty ire, as I imagine it could have come off as a flippant and disrespectful.

xXgreatestever said,

Because it's classy. When you invest your money into a business you don't sit down and get to know the guy behind it, you just get that appearance. Your more likely to feel more trusting in a guy who dresses up and seems to know what he is doing, and less likely from someone who knows what they are doing, but doesn't show it. Appearance is everything in this world. Sadly.

I understand to a notion where they're coming from, but I find it a stupid idea to judge someone because they don't wear a business suit every day.

Joshie said,

Wait, aren't you just judging people who wear "uptight" business suits, then?

Frankly, the 'look' of being well-dressed is an expression of a number of things, whether maturity, taking your work seriously, or taking that extra step to say "I don't just work for my company, I represent it."

Half of the Y chromosomes on the internet will happily join in discussions on why a well-grown beard is a symbol of their masculinity. Is it childish? Yeah, of course, it's no better than a 14 year old bragging about how his armpit hair makes him a man. But they still do it, because guys want to somehow visibly showcase their ascension to adulthood.

You can run around dressing like a middle schooler all you want, that's fine, it's comfortable, and some positions (ie., software engineers) aren't client-facing and don't HAVE to look nice every day. You probably still have some habit or element of style that you've made a conscious decision to maintain because you feel it separates you from your past immature self.

For others, that conscious decision plays a larger role in their career and image. That anyone would mock it only betrays their attempt to look 'above' anything at all.

Nope I'm not judging anyone for wearing suits, wear suites all you want. You want to come work for me wear a suite every day if you'd like, wear shorts if you want, as long as it's presentable, not dirty and isn't blatantly obnoxious I'm not worried. A guy in a thong with a wife beater shirt I'd be warry of.