Bill Gates and an all-star cast of developers create a video to inspire you to code

If you ask someone if they want to learn to code, you are met with a typical response of moans and groans about how it is a tedious and boring process that will take too long to master. This mentality is quite common but not always true and a new video from an awesome cast of coders is looking to sway your opinion.

To help foster the mindset that coding is a challenge but also an extremely rewarding endeavor, an all-star cast of coders have constructed a video that will inspire our youth to consider a coding career. The cast of the video includes Bill Gates, Mark Zuckerberg, Jack Dorsey, Drew Houston, Gabe Newell, Tony Hsieh and Miami Heat player Chris Bosh who provide their stories on how coding changed their lives.

The video is worth your time to watch and paints a picture that the team hopes will encourage you to learn how to code.  While we could write a thousand words about this video, its engaging content and high profile individuals make this an easy, and fantastic promotional video.

Source: YouTube

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So Bernie saw that an application - a program that does something useful for you - which has Lisp inside it and which you could extend by rewriting the Lisp programs, is actually a very good way for people to learn programming. It gives them a chance to write small programs that are useful for them, which in most arenas you can't possibly do. They can get encouragement for their own practical use - at the stage where it's the hardest - where they don't believe they can program, until they get to the point where they are programmers.

http://www.gnu.org/gnu/rms-lisp.html

HE WROTE A VERSION OF EMACS IN MULTICS MACLISP, AND HE WROTE HIS COMMANDS IN MACLISP IN A STRAIGHTFORWARD FASHION. THE EDITOR ITSELF WAS WRITTEN ENTIRELY IN LISP. MULTICS EMACS PROVED TO BE A GREAT SUCCESS PROGRAMMING NEW EDITING COMMANDS WAS SO CONVENIENT THAT EVEN THE SECRETARIES IN HIS OFFICE STARTED LEARNING HOW TO USE IT. THEY USED A MANUAL SOMEONE HAD WRITTEN WHICH SHOWED HOW TO EXTEND EMACS, BUT DIDN'T SAY IT WAS A PROGRAMMING. SO THE SECRETARIES, WHO BELIEVED THEY COULDN'T DO PROGRAMMING, WEREN'T SCARED OFF. THEY READ THE MANUAL, DISCOVERED THEY COULD DO USEFUL THINGS AND THEY LEARNED TO PROGRAM.

HE WROTE A VERSION OF EMACS IN MULTICS MACLISP, AND HE WROTE HIS COMMANDS IN MACLISP IN A STRAIGHTFORWARD FASHION. THE EDITOR ITSELF WAS WRITTEN ENTIRELY IN LISP. MULTICS EMACS PROVED TO BE A GREAT SUCCESS Edited by aludanyi, Feb 28 2013, 4:00pm :

The people in the video have GREAT incentive to promote coding. They, NEED them, They're going to NEED them in the future. It makes perfect sense that they would be the ones to promote that career choice. I'm not saying ANYTHING bad about them at all, it's what they NEED to be doing to get new talent trained and capable of having a coder pool to choose from in the future.

I'm a big fan of coding, but its advertised personal benefits, much like those touted by gamers and potheads, aren't exclusive to the activity and can be acquired through other hobbies and practices, too. I worry about the pro-coding movement's attitude that approaches a superiority complex.

what's most school don't teach:
In the computer world, an idea is worth $0. The implementation is the costly part.

Sometimes, a developer(s) is lucky, other times it is not. Most of the time, the first step involves to deal with bank or worst, with angel investor, in those both case, it means to sell our soul for a decade (if not more).

I've been a long time developer since the late stages of high-school. I love coding and designing solutions for a variety of problems. This video gave me extra motivation now. +1 to the creators of the video!

For every one person I've met who's *good* at coding I've met 20 who are terrible coders. This concept that anybody can code is laughable.

They are interviewing the cream of the crop... to them it's like breathing.

learning to code shouldn't start with code. I see all these C++ course and what not,and it really isn't the way to go. If the person doesn't know about CPU architectures,OS architecture(schedulers,kernel,API) and how memory works(stack,heap,objects),,about graphics(framebuffer), then they have no business learning C++. It is completely useless without knowing this stuff first,and I bet this is the cause of most people quitting before they even begin because it becomes overwhelming. try putting together a car engine without knowing what each and every part does,and how the whole system functions.

Or, you could start with a language that mostly abstracts away all these things, like Python. I'd wager early exposure to C++ is the reason why many people quit programming because it was too "frustrating" or "complicated".

I now want to learn how to code... At least a little, or until I start looking up how to code, try it myself and get extremely frustrated.

Not a bad video but I would say the best part is the quote at the start as imo coding does teach you to think, think logically and problem solve.

It's easy; just like I can say most people go through math anxiety is some way, including PHD level mathematicians according to one study, I can say most would find the mental rigor of real programming boring and tedious. Not to say anyone shouldn't give it a try though.

If you look around, a lot of people can't even wait in lines or do basic functions without speeding through them or "multi-tasking". If they don't have to do it, most people won't. There is a lot going on in this world and coding is near the "bottom of the list". After my experience learning html, I would rather pay someone to code for me.