Google uses Windows XP's end of support to push Chromebooks to corporations

Microsoft has tried to make the case that Chromebooks with Google's Chrome OS are not "real" laptops. Today, Google is taking a page out of Microsoft's "Scroogled" playbook by using the end of Windows XP support to make the case for Chromebooks for businesses.

In a post on its Enterprise blog, Google stated that from now until June 30th, companies that contact Chromebooks for Business sales will get $100 for each managed device that is bought by the customer. Google is also offering $200 off the recently launched VMware Desktop as a Service, which will allow businesses to access Windows apps remotely on Chromebooks.

Google's blog post also seems to compare Windows XP to certain trends of the early 2000s, saying, "Don’t let your business go the way of tamagotchis and parachute pants. It’s time for a real change — something we can all agree upon."

It's interesting that Google waited until today, the end of Microsoft's support of XP, to spring a bit of a counter-attack against the folks in Redmond who have slammed Chromebooks and their usefulness for a while now. It remains to be seen if Google's tactics will work in getting a larger customer base to bypass Windows 7 or 8.1 to get Chromebooks.

Source: Google | Image via Google

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Makes sense.
1. No Malware, Viruses, Rootkits, Keyloggers etc.
2. No maintenance.
3. Everything that's web standards compliant will run on it.
4. Low cost.
5. Cloud based, minimal infrastructure required.
6. Can run legacy enterprise apps via VMware cloud service.

The real question is, why on earth would an enterprise want to get locked back into the expensive and high maintenance Windows platform? Only to be held to ransom in another ten years time over end of life support.

simplezz said,
The real question is, why on earth would an enterprise want to get locked back into the expensive and high maintenance Windows platform?

Yes, it's better to be locked into a never-ending subscription and have your stuff held for ransom if you can't pay. :rolleyes: Lets face it, typical business software consists of more than a word processor or spreadsheet...

So XP people are afraid of change (Windows 8) so the logical answer is to offer them something familiar, something like Chromebook? Does it even make sense?

Yes, because if you don't like change (Or can't due to software requirements), switch platforms completely... That will solve everything... LMAO

Taking a page out of MS Scroogled playbook? Really? This doesnt even compare to the Scroogled campaign. Seriously Neowin writers, get a damn clue.

With that said, CBs have their place but not for corporations. And looks like my work is going Google Docs world wide over 6 divisions. Stupid assed mistake and I will be looking for another job soon. Idiots working in IT corporate here and they do not seem to understand that Google may be cheaper in upfront costs, but will cost more in support. Again, idiots in IT working at the corporate level making decisions for everyone without consulting each division. Morons, all of them.

"Hey kids, remember all that legacy software that keeps you clinging onto your archaic copy of Windows XP? BUY A CHROMEBOOK INSTEAD! Thanks to the Chromebook's inability to run the software you need, we guarantee your days of productivity and software problems are over!"

Sincerely,
Google

So rather than updating the OS they are going to buy new hardware, pay new licensing fees, upgrade all software to work on ChromeOS and possibly switch the software from x86 to ARM.

Sounds like a great idea! /s

They have already succeeded in a couple places. Chromebooks can be cheaper than an upgrade. If accessing the internet is the majority of the productive work certain businesses do then this could be a good idea.

stupid google, people don't upgrade because they are lazy and/or because their apps don't work. They already have chrome in XP via a browser.

plus nothing says irrelevant more than the OS that can't even beat linux desktops marketshare wise after years of trying and has to resort to XP migrations to sell anything.

Hey Google, you're suposed to discourage users to use Windows XP, don't start encouraging to start using an old OS now.

Price isn't a factor, not for schools, MS and others offer large price cuts or often times free software to schools through different programs. As far as business go, they'll either stay with XP because they have internal apps that just won't run on anything else, or they'll upgrade to windows 7/8 and run XP-mode which is a free option if they really need XP/IE6 for something.

Businesses that hang on to XP usually do so because they don't have the expertise/fear what will happen to their legacy applications on a newer version of Windows.

Schools and universities need these computers to run certain applications. For instance SSPS.

Lastly some dont upgrade because they dont want to adapt to the (small) changes that Windows 7 brings to XP users. Imagine how a Chromebook would work out for those people...

Smart idea. Google does offer competitive applications now, so it is feasible for companies to make the switch. However, Google is fighting an up-hill battle against an entrenched Microsoft. Windows and Office have been staples of the corporate computing world for so long, I doubt many big business will take the leap of faith required to convert to Google's services.

The company I work for switched to Google Apps to last year, and I'm telling you it's been nothing but a nightmare. Nothing's compatible with anything, data loss, everything just feels very dated and old school. There's even a petition going around to switch back to Office. I know this isn't related to the Chromebook, but on that note what company would honestly switch from a full-fledged OS to a browser lol.

spacer said,
Smart idea. Google does offer competitive applications now, so it is feasible for companies to make the switch. However, Google is fighting an up-hill battle against an entrenched Microsoft. Windows and Office have been staples of the corporate computing world for so long, I doubt many big business will take the leap of faith required to convert to Google's services.

As a Pro in IT I can tell you there is nothing competitive outside of search from Google.

j2006 said,
The company I work for switched to Google Apps to last year, and I'm telling you it's been nothing but a nightmare. Nothing's compatible with anything, data loss, everything just feels very dated and old school. There's even a petition going around to switch back to Office. I know this isn't related to the Chromebook, but on that note what company would honestly switch from a full-fledged OS to a browser lol.

Just because your company was ill prepared for the switch does not mean it isn't feasible.

spacer said,
Smart idea. Google does offer competitive applications now, so it is feasible for companies to make the switch. However, Google is fighting an up-hill battle against an entrenched Microsoft. Windows and Office have been staples of the corporate computing world for so long, I doubt many big business will take the leap of faith required to convert to Google's services.
There is nothing comparable to an intelligently run business. This is in no way an insult to Chrome OS, but requiring an OS that requires an internet connection is simply not going to work.

Heck, my company sometimes has issues with the internal network and we have internally debated running some of our software test suites on one of the clouds (just to isolate it and allow automatic expansion/shrinking), which has been summarily rejected by management due to intellectual property concerns (and, somewhat surprisingly, security). I cannot imagine if someone suggested to put every business user at the whims of the internet connection (ignoring the users that simply cannot use something along the lines of Chrome OS, like software engineers or graphics artists).

Meeting rooms without a connection? Nothing to show. Random day/time without a connection? Nothing to show or seriously work on. Traveling and you want to work in-between connections? Nothing to safely show unless the company coughs up money for 3/4G modems.

That might work for a very small number of use cases, but any intelligent business management will run from the idea. The upfront cost is far, far outweighed by the long term costs and frustrations.

Now, Google is counting on those [many] people that do not recognize the issues and those managers will therefore lock themselves into Google services like they were never locked into even Microsoft's before, which will be fine until one decides that they do not like it or that they need more power.

nickcruz said,
As a Pro in IT I can tell you there is nothing competitive outside of search from Google.

Their advertising and analytics platforms are quite competitive to the other players in those markets.

While I hate google as much as the next MS fanboy, you can't dismiss the entire company because their productivity suite is abysmal.

SDY is ok, and supported in IE11
They are the only name in robotics now that they've bought up all the leaders
I could go on, but it makes me nauseous to praise them.

Who said anything about Chrome OS? I said "Google Services". It's perfectly acceptable to run Gmail, Drive, Docs, Spreadsheets, etc on any OS that you want. No where did I say that Chrome OS is required for a company to commit to using Google instead of Microsoft.

spacer said,
Who said anything about Chrome OS? ........ No where did I say that Chrome OS is required for a company to commit to using Google instead of Microsoft.

In the comment section of a story about just that.

So they don't want to pay to upgrade XP... but they'll pay for a glorified web browser and then in addition pay a subscription to remotely run their software?

Exactly.... this is just silly. At least the Scroogled campaign spills the truth tea and provides good solutions.

This. Any company who takes this route has to be stupid. Not only are you paying extra, but you are also using third-party ways to work with Windows when you can simply work with Microsoft, pay much less, run apps on a supported Microsoft operating system and get support from Microsoft.

j2006 said,
XP > Chromebook.... to say they are same is just ridiculous

They're both useless crap notable only because of their limitations. Close enough for me.

Many many school systems are leaning towards these. Are you listening Microsoft? It's about the Malware, and the price.

Umm... malware? Have you ever used Android? It's the most malware-laden phone OS and is the most popular. so you can't really say it's 'about the malware'. I haven't received a single malware since Windows 8, it's been the most cleanest system to date. Also... from the very few schools I've heard of switching to google, they've experienced nothing but problems and productivity loss. To say Chromebook is a viable replacement for a full-fledged productivity OS like Windows is silly.

TAKEITBILL said,
Windows RT is same as Chrome book.
Correction: It's way better. If only for the fact that you get the full Office suite which you can use *offline*, a concept foreign to Chromebooks.

So Chromebooks run Android, you want to rethink that statement for a minute? Also, I'm not advocating using Chromebooks in schools, I am just telling you what schools are now purchasing in great quantities. Do a little homework and see for yourself.

Edited by jimmyfal, Apr 8 2014, 6:59pm :

Well most people don't get "hit" with Malware, they un-intentionally download and install it themselves because the bad guys are pretty good at fooling unsuspecting end user, like, KIDS. Chromebooks don't have to be managed like a real PC, if you give a kid an unmanaged PC (group policies etc.), that kid will take about 10 minutes to click on whatever might be clickable on the internet.

Delmont said,
Malware? Viruses? I can see you're still running XP. I haven't been hit with that stuff in years.

Actually most of my customer run Windows 8.1. And many many many many many many of them go looking for Chrome, or Picasa, or any download of the day, and click on the wrong thing and get a pre-packaged download of Chrome+MyPCBackup+ConduitSearch all in one nice tidy download.

You call them stupid, I call them Consumers, and kids that don't know any better. Last I checked Chromebooks don't currently run Malware, but Android does, please correct me if I'm wrong.

TAKEITBILL said,
Windows RT is same as Chrome book.

Lol.. Good luck opening or editing your office documents on a chromebook not connected to the internet..

j2006 said,
Umm... malware? Have you ever used Android? It's the most malware-laden phone OS and is the most popular. so you can't really say it's 'about the malware'.

Chromebooks don't run Android.

TAKEITBILL said,
Windows RT is same as Chrome book.

Not at all, really... other than neither will run Win32 Desktop apps.

Windows RT supports full Office (Excel, Word, PowerPoint, OneNote, Outlook), and can basically do everything a Chromebook can do, and then some. And then a lot more.

AsherGZ said,
Correction: It's way better. If only for the fact that you get the full Office suite which you can use *offline*, a concept foreign to Chromebooks.

Plus you get native driver support for printers and scanners. What I print from my android tablet comes out like crap but my surface 2 is just fine.

FloatingFatMan said,

Chromebooks don't run Android.


Thats the problem nobody knows what the hell is it? I actually like Google promoting chromebook because people buy it and return it and never buy it again just like I did.

j2006 said,
Umm... malware? Have you ever used Android? It's the most malware-laden phone OS and is the most popular. so you can't really say it's 'about the malware'.

Do you know anything about Chromebooks and why currently they cannot get malware? Because it doesnt seem like it.



I haven't received a single malware since Windows 8, it's been the most cleanest system to date.

And I have seen it many times. But this is an argument neither of us are going to win.


Also... from the very few schools I've heard of switching to google, they've experienced nothing but problems and productivity loss. To say Chromebook is a viable replacement for a full-fledged productivity OS like Windows is silly.

For many people who do just he basics...email, web browsing, light documenting...this would be a good cheap replacement for an aging system. Enterprise and people who want to do more, not so much.