Gorilla Glass 2 gives your devices more tough love

Back in 2007, Corning introduced Gorilla Glass, which quickly became the industry standard for damage-resistant glass used on mobile phones, tablets, notebooks, monitors and TVs across the world. Today, it is used by more than 30 multinational technology brands, and is integrated into over 570 products, which collectively amassed global sales last year of more than 500 million units.

But despite sales in 2011 tripling to $700m over the previous year, Corning wasn’t happy to rest on its laurels, and at CES, the company officially announced Gorilla Glass 2.

Corning’s James R Steiner said: “We knew Corning Gorilla Glass could get even better. So, in response to our customers’ drive toward thinner form factors, we designed this new glass to enable meaningful reduction in thickness without sacrificing performance.”

Indeed, Gorilla Glass 2 maintains the damage-resistance, scratch-resistance and all-round toughness that the product has become famous for, while facilitating a 20% reduction in the thickness of the glass. Making the glass thinner obviously allows for slimmer devices, but also boosts touch sensitivity and improves image brightness on protected displays.

Some of the first devices on sale with Gorilla Glass 2 early this year will be Windows notebooks, and Steiner believes that the two are a match made in heaven: “This glass, along with Windows operating system innovations from Microsoft, will help deliver exceptional beauty, performance, and toughness for new Windows PCs.”

Microsoft’s Nick Parker, VP for Worldwide OEM Marketing, agrees. “As Windows continues to bring new experiences to customers on new devices, we look to Corning to bring innovative, durable glass solutions that enable brighter images and greater touch sensitivity”, said Parker, hinting at the next-generation tablets that will arrive later this year with Windows 8.

Until those new products arrive though, first-generation Gorilla Glass will soldier on. If you're not sure if your device has Gorilla Glass already, check out Corning's list of protected devices. And if you're not yet convinced that Gorilla Glass makes any difference at all, take a moment or two to enjoy this video - via pestaola.gr - of a Nokia Lumia 800 being attacked with coins, keys and a Swiss army knife:

Update: Thanks to Neowin reader foodan who pointed out this more vigorous scratch/drop test.

Whatever your opinion is on this technology, short of getting brutal on your device protected with Gorilla Glass, the above videos show that it stands up to the common scenarios most of us have experienced.

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28 Comments

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I want to see those kind of improvements with metal and plastic parts... you know, cause I can't stand scratches on the side of my iPhone (which I happily have got close to none of ^^) or the scratches on other parts.

I just don't like scratches at all. Kill them with fire, hooray for science.
Supporting my spoiled taste since <insert imaginary year>! Cheers!

GS:mac

Gorilla glass or not thats why i always have screen protector so lets say double and i've dropped once or twice but i have silicon cover too so safe safe and safe.

i managed to scratch up my phone's gorilla glass... it was by accident and i had no idea it would happen, but it turns out that coins and stuff wont do anything, but metal jewelry will easily scratch the screen

drop the ****ing phone from your shoulder and tell me if survives with this gorrila 2.0

on the second video, is that a ladyboy? Good God!

The person that is shooting this test has no brain. I assume he suppose to use light refraction to reveal if there's any scratch but yet there was no proper light refraction angle towards the camera. What proof can he possibly trying to show?

I hear the iPhone doesn't use Gorilla Glass because Steve Jobs said Apple made their own glass. I hope that's true because the iPhone 4 isn't very drop resistant. Let's just say Apple uses Monkey Glass.

Enron said,
I hear the iPhone doesn't use Gorilla Glass because Steve Jobs said Apple made their own glass. I hope that's true because the iPhone 4 isn't very drop resistant. Let's just say Apple uses Monkey Glass.

I still don't understand how people break there phones. I have had 2 iPhones for the past 3 years as well as a few Android phones and Windows phones. I have never had a single one crack/break. I have dropped them all. My iPhone 3GS even flew out a car window once while driving through the neighborhood(never leave it on the dash lol) At 25 miles and hour and hitting the pavement, no cracks. My iPhone 4 has hit the ground a few times while walking around and still no breaking. What exactly is it you people do to break your phones? It just doesn't make sense.

It could be as simple as droping it a foot onto the table. It's not about the force at that moment, exclusively, but also about the consistancy of the glass, and how much pressure and force it has been exposed to over its lifetime, which will weaken it.

That's one test I won't be doing with my iPhone 4! I always ensure that coins are in my other pocket and nothing but my iPhone in the other

Enron said,
I hear the iPhone doesn't use Gorilla Glass because Steve Jobs said Apple made their own glass. I hope that's true because the iPhone 4 isn't very drop resistant. Let's just say Apple uses Monkey Glass.

Apple doesn't use Gorilla Glass, they broke off with the maker of Gorilla Glass when Apple decided it could reproduce the concept themselves.

Sadly though, Apple did mimic parts of the 'scratch proof' properties, but did not also incorporate the 'flexibility' aspect of Gorilla Glass. The flexibility adds an additional level of scratch protection, as the display flexs slightly instead of scratching.

The big issue is without the 'flexibility' aspect, the Glass on the new iPhone 4 and 4s shatters easily. Previous generations used scratch 'resistent' glass that also had flexibility problems.

This is why iPhones don't scratch easily, but put one in your jeans pocket with a couple of quarters and the 'flexing' will crack the screen rather easily.

Gorilla Glass is highly scratch proof and is far more flexible making it even more scratch proof and less likely to crack when dropped.

Microsoft and ZuneHD helped to launch this technology, even though the device wasn't a powerhouse seller, it made an impression on the 'expectations' of what is possible for media devices and later phones. (When the ZuneHD first came out, people were taking knives and tools to the screen on YouTube.) Also dropping, kicking, stepping on, and dropping them.
*I have one of the first ZuneHD that came out, and after years of dropping, kicking it across concrete, stepping on it upside down on gravel, and stuff I can't remember, and the screen is still flawless. (Never did use a screen protector, never had a need for one.)

Apple tried to circumvent having to pay for Gorilla Glass, and in the end, they got crap that shatters rather easily.

As more devices use Gorilla Glass and screen protectors are even a thing of the past, Apple will have to up the game and provide at least this level of protection.

I wish Microsoft would have made Gorilla Glass a requirement for WP7, as not all models have it. However, with strained relations with the OEMs and Gorilla Glass maker 'some due to Apple *Samsung/LG cough*, there would be less early Windows 7 phone providers.

(There are some interesting technical articles on Gorilla Glass, the chemical technology, and even contrast technical reviews of Apple's glass technology that highlight the flexibility failing.)

greenwizard88 said,
It could be as simple as droping it a foot onto the table. It's not about the force at that moment, exclusively, but also about the consistancy of the glass, and how much pressure and force it has been exposed to over its lifetime, which will weaken it.

Its about lack of flexibility. Bing/Google Gorilla Glass Apple Flexible

It looks lke Apple might be giving up on their generic version for the next iPhone and using real Gorilla Glass 2.

Enron said,

Where does that say Apple helped in developing Gorilla Glass?

Firstly, helping develop Gorilla Glass is different to helping launch Gorilla Glass technology.

Secondly, to answer the question - "Where does that say Apple helped in launching Gorilla Glass?" - look at the first sentence (I didn't bother quoting the article as I felt it was hard to miss the relevant parts. Oh well.):

Inside Apple writer Adam Lashinky at Fortune and Steve Jobs Biography writer Walter Isaacson recently discussed a great story of how Steve Jobs got Corning to (re)invent Gorilla Glass

Feel free to actually read the excerpt from the interview at that link.

M_Lyons10 said,
Nice. Gorilla Glass should be on everything. LOL

Yes. Including glass lenses, and drinking glasses.

M_Lyons10 said,

HAHAHA, well I wouldn't mind it for my glasses... lol


This, can't stand my constant "micro dust particles will scratch your glasses when you use anything but microfiber to clean them"

I feel so guilty when using my shirt...

GS:mac

nik louch said,
That test video is the weakest tests ever

lmfao so true. You do that on any phone and you won't have any results. Dropping coins or keys on a phone from about an inch away is a joke. Try dropping them from at least a foot away or applying a little pressure with the knife and corkscrew. Realistically, you'll be scratching the surface a lot harder than that example.