Helio's bumpy road

Between picking your cell phone model and choosing your provider, the wireless world is filled with options. It's hard to ignore the heavily advertised companies like Verizon and AT&T, which peddle such popular phones as the iPhone and Blackberries. This makes for tough competition when it comes to the lesser known companies such as Helio. Now more than ever people are wondering; why should I go or stay with Helio?

When Helio first started out, they prided themselves on being an innovative and media oriented wireless company, with excellent customer service. Combine that with the fact that you could not watch a reality TV show without seeing someone famous with their device, and you have a fairly coveted product. Things started out slow but steady for the new company, and they eventually attracted the attention of Virgin Mobile.

Just before the acquisition by Virgin Mobile took place, the newest addition to the Helio lineup, the Ocean 2, was expected to be released. Both existing and potentially new customers anxiously awaited the release, as the company desperately needed something new to keep people interested. While the release date continues to be pushed back, more and more people continue to leave and steer clear of Helio. The fact that Virgin Mobile continues to release new phones for their prepaid plans does not lift spirits within the Helio community.

There is no denying that the Helio Ocean is a great phone. But when a company claims they are cutting edge, they can not allow themselves to fall behind the times. At this moment, Helio has nothing significant to offer that sets them apart from the many other options out there. Thus leaving people with no incentive to buy their products.

From what we can see, the Ocean 2 specs will still fail to impress people once it is released. Without major changes in both their service and phones, it seems as though Helio will continue to spin its wheels.

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