Microsoft sees end of Windows era

Microsoft has kicked off a research project to create software that will take over when it retires Windows. Called Midori, the cut-down operating system is radically different to Microsoft's older programs. It is centred on the internet and does away with the dependencies that tie Windows to a single PC. It is seen as Microsoft's answer to rivals' use of "virtualisation" as a way to solve many of the problems of modern-day computing.

Although Midori has been heard about before now, more details have now been published by Software Development Times after viewing internal Microsoft documents describing the technology. Midori is believed to be under development because Windows is unlikely to be able to cope with the pace of change in future technology and the way people use it.

News source: BBC News

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Why don't Microsoft kill windows 7 and focus on Midori

I think Midori is another project bound to sucks just like vista is today. I am now currently a true ubuntu switcher thanks to the wine and other alternatives that does just the same thing as a windows app

I think Windows XP is probably the best OS Microsoft has produced to date, to include Windows Vista. Vista has some nice ergonomic improvements for your normal at home user, but that's about it. I own a copy of Vista, so I'm not some poor college kid speaking out of jealousy. I see a lot of potential in Windows XP for a standard operating system, but Microsoft had to produce a whole new, unstable, incompatible, and sluggish OS just to add some pretty desktop effects.

I think that Microsoft should really look back and continue support for Windows 2000+ and not worry about throwing away everything they've done in lieu of something completely different. Linux operating systems are getting closer and closer to being a viable option for non-technical users. The biggest hurdle at the moment is hardware support, which is being solved by companies that support the free open source movement. If this goes where I think it's going, I think support for Linux operating systems is only going to grow.

(marcusdean.adams said @ #18)
I think Windows XP is probably the best OS Microsoft has produced to date, to include Windows Vista.
Personal opinion, and therefore cannot be used as a base for arguing why a software vendor should stop making new versions of their software.
Plus, you fail to remember history (XP had way bigger problems than Vista had at their respective launch days).

(marcusdean.adams said @ #18)
Vista has some nice ergonomic improvements for your normal at home user, but that's about it.
Not only are you straight out wrong, but I don't understand what you mean by "ergonomic improvements". I'm going to assume you mean "handy little things", like the taskbar preview and an Explorer sidebar that actually helps you get to your commonly used folders faster, instead of being a glorified My Documents shortcut.
I'm not going to bother listing all the useful features Vista has over XP, because I think you know them, and just enjoy trolling/flamebaiting.

(marcusdean.adams said @ #18)
I own a copy of Vista, so I'm not some poor college kid speaking out of jealousy.
You don't sound like a poor college kid speaking out of jealousy, you sound like the "I fail to understand that newer OS = newer hardware unless I want to use an OS that needs emulators for most games" and the "History Drop-out", and finally the "My choice is the correct one and you (including Microsoft) should conform to my choice or GTFO" type.

(marcusdean.adams said @ #18)
I see a lot of potential in Windows XP for a standard operating system, but Microsoft had to produce a whole new, unstable, incompatible, and sluggish OS just to add some pretty desktop effects.
I see a lot of potential in Windows Vista being utilised by more and more apps and games, but progress in that respect is halted because people refuse to accept that if you use outdated OSes, you don't get the newest apps.

(marcusdean.adams said @ #18)
I think that Microsoft should really look back and continue support for Windows 2000+ and not worry about throwing away everything they've done in lieu of something completely different.
I'm glad Microsoft doesn't look back, the future shouldn't be put on hold.

(marcusdean.adams said @ #18)
Linux operating systems are getting closer and closer to being a viable option for non-technical users. The biggest hurdle at the moment is hardware support, which is being solved by companies that support the free open source movement. If this goes where I think it's going, I think support for Linux operating systems is only going to grow.
Look at the newer brands of CPUs, GPUs and motherboards. What do you see as the selling point on all of those products? Overclocking.
Tell me, when was the last time you overclocked your CPU/GPU and noticed Firefox/OpenOffice loading THAT much faster? I'm guessing never, unless you invested in liquid nitrogen and overclocked your CPU to 1 THz.
For the people who Linux is/will be a viable alternative to Windows, overclocking will not matter because they use Linux for browsing the web, reading email and creating documents.

What conclusion can we draw from this? The future is supported by gamers. Without gamers, there would be no reason to bring out faster, bigger and better CPUs/GPUs for the home-user market. Just give them all to NASA and be done with it.

Linux needs GAMING support, Linux needs to be able to out of the box run ALL games that Windows can run without needing to fiddle about with settings in some emulator, THEN Linux will become a viable alternative.
Not before.

What conclusion can we draw from this? The future is supported by gamers. Without gamers, there would be no reason to bring out faster, bigger and better CPUs/GPUs for the home-user market. Just give them all to NASA and be done with it.

Linux needs GAMING support, Linux needs to be able to out of the box run ALL games that Windows can run without needing to fiddle about with settings in some emulator, THEN Linux will become a viable alternative.
Not before.

Well said. Unfortunately, games today are not as efficient at moving the PC forward than they were 4 years ago, because the console market is now predominant. Proof of this is that there is yet no game that is built from the ground up on DX10, while the API have been around for at least 18 months now. And little plans for building one. Half-Life 2 which really showed off all the possibilities of DX9 was out in 2004, about 18 months after DX9.0b. So the adoption rate is definitely slower now.

(Belazor said @ #2)
Personal opinion, and therefore cannot be used as a base for arguing why a software vendor should stop making new versions of their software.
Plus, you fail to remember history (XP had way bigger problems than Vista had at their respective launch days).

Which undoubtedly is true, but with XP Microsoft did a way better job to get their problems under control. The best example is the Vista SP1 which had to be recalled twice before a working verison of it was available. This is something that never happened for XP.

I see a lot of potential in Windows Vista being utilised by more and more apps and games, but progress in that respect is halted because people refuse to accept that if you use outdated OSes, you don't get the newest apps.

This is a point that I do not agree with. Using an "outdated" OS like Windows XP does have its benefits. I mean an OS is not outdated as long as there is active support from its vendor. And with support until 2012 for XP Pro it has a very high chance of actually outliving Vista.

I'm glad Microsoft doesn't look back, the future shouldn't be put on hold.

Here we would have to split the view. While longer support for Windows 2000+ is highly recommendable in corporate environments it is rather uninteresting for Home Users. The future should not be put on hold, I agree to this, but it is also a mistake to discard the past too quickly.

Linux needs GAMING support, Linux needs to be able to out of the box run ALL games that Windows can run without needing to fiddle about with settings in some emulator, THEN Linux will become a viable alternative.
Not before.

Apart from everything said here I do have to say that Linux already is a viable alternative to Windows. And if its just for the games, Linux offers convinient installers for some (not all) Games. But to use your example from above, it is very possible to install Half Life 2 including Steam on Linux without the use for an emulator. Only problem here is you have to know where to look as unfortunatly they are not heavily advertised.

'centered' on the internet doesnt mean "internet OS"... I guess. We still dont know what an "internet" OS is lol

Microsoft creating an entirely new platform isnt that hard to conceive. IMO, it was bound to happen, although I still expect newer versionS of windows being released until the newer thing has been polished. Then, the newer thing would be on a similar level of hardware compatibility as windows' competitors, unless they use windows drivers in the newer thing. So it will be Windows vs Newer thing vs Linux vs the rest

From what I remember Midori is made using managed code almost fully (parts of the kernel aren't though etc) And that's all .NET with C# etc. If this is the idea then wouldn't any current .NET app just work? Or with some minor tweaks can be made to work?

Drivers though, I dunno. Those are the key here so who knows. Anyways, we're talking like, 2015 at the least here.

(rdmiller said @ #1)
It's amazing how the Brits can make pure speculation sound so authoritative!!!

I'm only saying if it did happen it wouldn't work in Britain with our poor broadband cover.

I assure you that the news post was not "stolen". There is no connection between Breaking News stories and Front Page articles - though it would be a good idea. The exact same thing happened to me a few days ago, but I accepted that it was an honest mistake.

For the record I have long backed the idea of bringing Breaking News to the Front Page, thus eliminating problems like this and needlessly duplicating comment threads.

uhhhh you do know you have to actually submit the news to neowin, not just post it on the forums, if you want credit right? how else are they supposed to know it's there?

(Lt-DavidW said @ #9.1)
I assure you that the news post was not "stolen". There is no connection between Breaking News stories and Front Page articles - though it would be a good idea. The exact same thing happened to me a few days ago, but I accepted that it was an honest mistake.

For the record I have long backed the idea of bringing Breaking News to the Front Page, thus eliminating problems like this and needlessly duplicating comment threads.

Yeah, I know it was a mistake and yes, getting breaking news and the front page together is a good idea, but it will never happen I don't think.

I have posted a BPN thread, then found the same item posted on FPN because someone else submitted it as Front Page news.

I just never whined about it.

(Titoist said @ #9)
So, I see neowin favours certain people, the news post was stolen and given credit to Lt-DavidW. Now here is MY post that I posted yesteray of the exact same thing, a whole 24hr before this was "front page".

What do you want, a medal? You could've easily submitted to the newsdesk if you wished. The link isn't hidden, it's right there on the front page.

So if my internet goes offline briefly, or I move to a location with no coverage on broadband my PC wont work? I don't think Britain for example would be ready for this in even 10 years, lol.

Well what did you think, that they were going to just close down and let the Linux crowd in? Ha ha ha, that's a good way to make a profitable business.

Besides, you've already "replaced" Windows with other software so what does it really matter to you if Windows is dead or alive?

(markjensen said @ #4)
The end of Windows! Yea!!!

Oh, wait....
/me reads article

Oh, replacing it with another Microsoft product... Darn.

(C_Guy said @ #4.1)
Well what did you think, that they were going to just close down and let the Linux crowd in? Ha ha ha, that's a good way to make a profitable business.

Besides, you've already "replaced" Windows with other software so what does it really matter to you if Windows is dead or alive?

I would have thought you knew me a little better than that.

At least dmd3x could see I was just being goofy (and poking a little fun at people who like to post without reading anything more than the title).

there are several major plane companies that are already putting wifi in by the end of the year. all the others will follow suit quickly.

plus it's not like they are going to throw the current computer setup out the window. 1TB hard drives only cost $160. that's plenty of space to temporarily store your files (no matter what programs you are running) until you're within wifi range, at which point it will upload them to the cloud

(PermaSt0ne said @ #3.1)
there are several major plane companies that are already putting wifi in by the end of the year. all the others will follow suit quickly.

plus it's not like they are going to throw the current computer setup out the window. 1TB hard drives only cost $160. that's plenty of space to temporarily store your files (no matter what programs you are running) until you're within wifi range, at which point it will upload them to the cloud


Can we play FarCry in my PC without Windows (& DirectX )

How can print a Photoshop file!?

I need to save & make a DVD out of my pictures?

Are they speaking about integrating Windows live plaftform into windows seven? (I use Live Mesh...it mimics the capability...but not safe for full shift!)

I hope Windows is around a while longer. If most ISPs become per GB capped, no one will want cloud computing, we want local access.

(Intelman said @ #2)
I hope Windows is around a while longer. If most ISPs become per GB capped, no one will want cloud computing, we want local access.

All it will require is upgrading the infrastructure , Japan and Korea have amazing speeds because of it.

(Beastage said @ #2)

All it will require is upgrading the infrastructure , Japan and Korea have amazing speeds because of it.

But (in Canada, and probably true for most of North America) the ISPs and Telcos have been reluctant at best to perform any infrastructure upgrades. They're content to sit on their asses, and collect money, providing minimal support, and no plans to upgrade or enhance the service that we're forced to pay for, due to lack of any alternative.

What's more, they've not only taken on the service provider role, for a system they didn't design or build, but also a policing role, deciding who gets access when and to where. For them, upgrading the overall infrastructure will just mean more police work, more service providing, and more support, and they won't be able to charge significantly more than they already are.

Due to the veritable monopoly on the market (and the government's unwillingness to fix that) there's not even an incentive to attract new customers, because they're all already the only choice. People who are not using it are doing so by choice, and won't be swayed by higher speeds or lower prices.

There's absolutely no incentive for them to upgrade the infrastructure, and until some major industry shake-up happens, with the emergence of a drastic new technology, governmental action, or mass consumer action.

Japan has the infrastructure they do for two reasons: their development is more recent, and their physical area is considerably smaller, with a higher population density. Japanese internet companies have less area to cover, so they can upgrade more cheaply, and their entire backbone is considerably newer.

So, again, barring a major industry shake-up, nothing is going to happen to allow reasonably fast, open internet access in North America anytime soon, and Cloud Computing is doomed.

(Intelman said @ #2)
I hope Windows is around a while longer. If most ISPs become per GB capped, no one will want cloud computing, we want local access.

They're never going to get away with it. Any ISP that doesn't start adding capacity NOW is going to be out of business later.

LOL... this is old news for tech site visitors like us but since the BBC finally heard about it, I just hope Midori is 64bit only, with no backward support build into the architecture , backward support should come only in form of virtual machine.

(C_Guy said @ #1.1)
"no backward support"

Ha ha ha ha ha... oh man, you should do stand-up!! HA HA HA HA!!!

No really.. good idea, virtual machines should be a good solution, or stick with the old OS. Enough of the b/c..

(WICKO said @ #1.2)

No really.. good idea, virtual machines should be a good solution, or stick with the old OS. Enough of the b/c..


Just because YOU don't need it, doesn't mean it should be dropped like it's hot.
Let me see...
I don't personally need domain logins...
Yea, let's trash that along with... The possibility to create more than 1 or 2 personal accounts to log in with.

I'm sure you can just SOMEHOW max the performance and resource use efficiency by at least a proper 0.0005% at least...
I'm fascinated, where's my nobel prize for excellent ideas, no you take it, you made me think about it and started with this.

Ah so glorious....

Glassed Silver:mac
PS: yea, sorry... having my sarcastic day. forgive me, just teasing ^^

(Glassed Silver said @ #1.3)
Just because YOU don't need it, doesn't mean it should be dropped like it's hot.[snip]
PS: yea, sorry... having my sarcastic day. forgive me, just teasing ^^

You sort of missed the point Silver. Technology should be moving forward, and 64 has been out for years. The only way to finally make people program for it is by forcing it on everybody. It wouldn't be a disaster for long, people just pretend it will be because they hate change so much.