Microsoft's $25 Windows 8 iOS developer offer sells out

If you are a iOS software developer, you might have heard something about a way to get a copy of both Windows 8 Pro and Parallels Desktop 8 for just $25. That special price was announced on Tuesday (the money itself went to charity) but now it's too late to get in on this deal.

The offer page on swish.com shows that they have sold out of their pre-orders for this deal and to no surprise the page was hammered yesterday and was off-line or hard to reach for several hours. Windows 8 Pro starts its pricing at $120 and Parallels Desktop 8 has a price of $70, so the people who were lucky enough to take advantage of this price were able to score a great deal.

However, Microsoft wants to keep encouraging iOS developers to make apps for Windows 8 and ZDNet.com reports that a Microsoft spokesperson said since this offer this week was so popular it will launch similar Mac developer deals "in the near future."

As we reported on Tuesday, Microsoft has also released an update to its Modern.IE software developer service that contains "new enhancements and virtualized copies of IE10 on Windows 7 and IE8 on Windows XP for testing purposes."

Source: ZDNet.com | Image via Microsoft

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A copy of Parallels and a coaster for 25 buxx?! Yea, that was a deal. Hmm, probably no physical media. A copy of Parallels for 25 buxx?!? DEAL!

runningnak3d said
A copy of Parallels and a coaster for 25 buxx?! Yea, that was a deal. Hmm, probably no physical media. A copy of Parallels for 25 buxx?!? DEAL!
It won't be long (imo) before physical media is gone. I'm going to say maybe, 2-3 years.

It was physical media AFAIK, you had to pay shipping on top of the $25, so it was $35 or something in total to the US or $41 worldwide.

The tough question is did it reach its intended audience? A lot of people who aren't iOS devs took part since it ended up on so many tech blogs.

The tricky job for Microsoft is to win back the hearts and minds of developers. That is looking like an increasingly uphill battle with each passing day.

LogicalApex said,
The tough question is did it reach its intended audience? A lot of people who aren't iOS devs took part since it ended up on so many tech blogs.

The tricky job for Microsoft is to win back the hearts and minds of developers. That is looking like an increasingly uphill battle with each passing day.

I'm pretty sure it was for developers only and required a developer IID for you to get it.

IMO the fact that you can develop for Windows 8 in Javascript makes it more appealing to a lot of people than Android or iOS. The downside is that there are so few Windows RT devices, that making something specifically for windows 8 seems like a bit of a lost cause still.

So, no, this didn't help them, and I don't think anything will until Windows Blue and the prospect of 7'' tablets comes to light.

threetonesun said,
IMO the fact that you can develop for Windows 8 in Javascript makes it more appealing to a lot of people than Android or iOS. The downside is that there are so few Windows RT devices, that making something specifically for windows 8 seems like a bit of a lost cause still.

So, no, this didn't help them, and I don't think anything will until Windows Blue and the prospect of 7'' tablets comes to light.


Few RT devices but the apps do work on normal Win8 too and maybe with Blue, also on WP8 without doing anything (except keeping in mind the resolutions) . And by deploying in app in the store you will be able to reach a giant audience. Android/Iphone are a few 100 mill. There's over a billion Windows PC's waiting to be upgraded. (not all ofc, but allot will or they'll upgrade by buying a new system).
And since embedded just been released, you will see Windows 8 catching on in the production world too. (even today many use CE or XP embedded)

threetonesun said
The downside is that there are so few Windows RT devices, that making something specifically for windows 8 seems like a bit of a lost cause still.
Well, you see. I believe that the more apps that are on a platform, the more people will use it because they will see that "hey, this device can do that too, nice".

I think that the more apps on a platform can = more users

The opposing side thinks that there needs to be more users first before developers should start coding for the platform. I disagree with that 100% because I think that if a device has apps that people can make use of, then they'll be more inclined to buy it - because they can vision themselves using it. But that's just me.

My point was more that there are so few Windows RT devices but still so many Windows PCs that if you were creating something new, right now, and targeting Windows, you still might as well release it as a desktop application.

Until there's a stronger push for using Windows as a tablet-only operating system, I don't see development picking up. Don't get me wrong, I think it will get there eventually, but not until there's a real option at the Nexus 7 / iPad Mini level.

GP007 said,

I'm pretty sure it was for developers only and required a developer IID for you to get it.


No you didn't, all you needed to do was activate a disabled button, and I'm pretty sure a quick google will tell the average joe how to do that.