Office 2010 selling at record pace, 50% increase in sales

Microsoft Office 2010 has now been out on the market for six months and the product is still selling at a record pace. Office has experienced double digit growth in its first full quarter on the market and the sales don’t appear to be letting up anytime soon.

According to Microsoft Office Division News Bites, “customers are buying Office 2010 at a record pace. Office has seen double-digit growth in its first full quarter on the market, a 50 percent increase in business non-annuity sales, and a 5 percent increase in multi-year licenses in Q1”

When Neowin asked Microsoft why they thought Office 2010 was selling faster than previous versions, a spokesperson responded, “Customers are telling us that they like the new direction of Office 2010 and our long-term vision for office productivity. For example, the new features in Office 2010 give businesses, small and large, new levels of productivity gains by allowing them to collaborate better, work across platforms and leverage the cloud".

Neowin recently reported that Office 2010 SP1 has been sent out to beta testers.  A general rule in the IT world is to not install any products from Microsoft until SP1 has been released; this is typically done to ensure stability and security for the end user. When SP1 does finally make its way to the market, you can expect Office 2010 sales to continue their growth as corporations begin their adoption of the platform.  

 

Report a problem with article
Previous Story

AVG update sends computers into limbo

Next Story

Hands on: Verizon 4G (LTE)

52 Comments

Commenting is disabled on this article.

And the idiotic cycle continues...
MS releases Office 2010, users flock to stores, pay a few hundred dollars of their hard earned cash for the upgrade, and do exactly the same thing they've been doing with MS Office since Office 97. When the next Office comes out, they will again flock to stores, spend money blindly for a product they will not take full advantage of.

A big part of any increased Ofc sales is because 1) lower priced packages from the start, & 2) bundling & sales riding win7's coattails.

MS likes to make money -- otherwise full Ofc packs would be much cheaper. Offering lower priced versions, bundling, & sales/marketing all cost profits... why do any of that if you don't have to? However you feel about Microsoft, they're not *that* stupid.

That's NOT saying Ofc 1020 is/isn't great or anything, & I don't want to take anything away from those who have bought Ofc 2010. But in today's economy cutting prices, the more the better, is what sells, e.g. last Monday retailers who'd been monitoring sales over the 4 day weekend, came out with a new round of sales & discounts late in the afternoon (Eastern time) -- allegedly Monday's on-line sales set records.

the pirates can create pirated servers so that the pirated copies will talk to these servers instead. problem solved.

warr said,
the pirates can create pirated servers so that the pirated copies will talk to these servers instead. problem solved.

Exist a solucion where you can install the software for free during 6 months and rearm it 3 more times, so you can use for 2 years for free (and apparently legally), just in time to wait for office 2012

Seriously how can you not like Office? Free software ie: Open Office isn't the same. Must everyone hate on MSFT products? Don't understand. Let's use Linux terminal for word processing, it's free, c'mon now!

Eddie ELZ said,
Seriously how can you not like Office? Free software ie: Open Office isn't the same. Must everyone hate on MSFT products? Don't understand. Let's use Linux terminal for word processing, it's free, c'mon now!

I concur.
I wish that exist a real alternative for Office, While the Open Office Writte is simmilar to Office (but lack some cool features) but Open Office Calc is not a viable alternative for Excel, neither open office have a counterpart for PowerPoint, Access, Project and Visio.

Get a Mac and use iWork. Or get Open Office. If neither one stands up to MS Office then I guess you know what the alternatives have to offer. Why settle for less?

Eddie ELZ said,
Seriously how can you not like Office? Free software ie: Open Office isn't the same. Must everyone hate on MSFT products? Don't understand. Let's use Linux terminal for word processing, it's free, c'mon now!

Yeah, I agree. I think products like Open Office and iWorks have a place in the home or with students who really can't afford to spend any money on software. But, when it comes down to being a professional who has to use a word processor, spreadsheet, and other productivity programs (like what is in MS Office), MS Office remains the king of user experience and feature set for both Mac and Windows so why settle for less than that?

Shadrack said,

Yeah, I agree. I think products like Open Office and iWorks have a place in the home or with students who really can't afford to spend any money on software. But, when it comes down to being a professional who has to use a word processor, spreadsheet, and other productivity programs (like what is in MS Office), MS Office remains the king of user experience and feature set for both Mac and Windows so why settle for less than that?

I never said I had anything against OpenOffice (even for Windows) - I used OO for Windows prior to Office 2010's beta due to faster PDF export than Office 2007 (pre-SP1), and still do use OO in Linux (and Solaris). However, due to OO not having a mail program (and further due to no other mail program having the capabilities of Outlook, and that is without Exchange support) and Office fixing the PDF export issue, why not return to the reigning champ of productivity suites?

Office 2011 is probably doing well for the Mac as well. Just think, Office is still relavent in this day and age (vs cloud, vs free software)

Having used both 2007 and 2010 (2010 was free via a tech guarantee), here's my thoughts:

The ribbon in Office 2007 has to be the most innovative thing Microsoft ever introduced to Office. Made everything easier and faster to access than the menu bars and toolbars of 2003 and before. 2010 simply cleaned it up a bit and expanded its use across the board (e.g. Outlook).

Yup. People can hate on the Ribbon all they want. Once they spend 5 minutes to master it they understand how ignorant they were being. That's what happened to me.

I, and many others in my company, purchased it for $15 (Pro Plus).... so it is no wonder they've sold a few copies. I wouldn't pay the retail asking price, that's for sure!

Windows 7, Office 2010 and Xbox 360/Kinect selling like mad, Winodws Phone 7 numbers would be interesting although I think it's more of a long term product since they are overcoming past repuation in that space. Server 2008 R2 is well accpeted and Exchange 2010 is receiving steady adoption. So what exactly is wrong with MS and more specifically Steve Ballmer? They might be late to market on decent phones and tablets, but they seem to be firing on all other cylinders pretty well.

bob_c_b said,
Windows 7, Office 2010 and Xbox 360/Kinect selling like mad, Winodws Phone 7 numbers would be interesting although I think it's more of a long term product since they are overcoming past repuation in that space. Server 2008 R2 is well accpeted and Exchange 2010 is receiving steady adoption. So what exactly is wrong with MS and more specifically Steve Ballmer? They might be late to market on decent phones and tablets, but they seem to be firing on all other cylinders pretty well.

What's wrong is that they aren't Apple, the David.

Steve Jobs has done an utterly fantastic job of protraying himself (and Apple) as David to Microsoft and the Other Steve's Goliath - how else is it that Apple can get away with things that Microsoft would be sued to death for even trying, even when the pundits say they should?

Businesses in general didn't upgrade to 2007...they don't upgrade to the first iteration of a new 'approach' full stop, just as they didn't with Vista.

Second iteration is out, it's upgrade time.

e-berlin.org said,
And ORACLE's FREE OpenOffice suite has 5 times more downloads than last year.

Great, but how many actually still use it after the first experience and don't go back to Microsoft Office?

e-berlin.org said,
And ORACLE's FREE OpenOffice suite has 5 times more downloads than last year.

Which netted Oracle exactly $0 in revenue.

e-berlin.org said,
And ORACLE's FREE OpenOffice suite has 5 times more downloads than last year.

this means nothing. if they had 100 (exaggeration, i know) downloads last year, this only means they had 500 this year. So it really doesn't compare.

Digitalfox said,
Great, but how many actually still use it after the first experience and don't go back to Microsoft Office?

I'm a little curious, after having dealt with Microsoft office for years, as to why people use it in the first place?

Most of the clients I've seen use Word, some very very basic functions of Excel and some rudimentary Powerpoint - all of which you can do with .. practically ANY word processing software out there, heck you could do most of the things I've seen people use Word for with Notepad.

So this leaves the big question; why would you pay so much for Office? And of course the answer is "someone sent me a .doc which I couldn't open with another program".

Miuku said,

I'm a little curious, after having dealt with Microsoft office for years, as to why people use it in the first place?

Most of the clients I've seen use Word, some very very basic functions of Excel and some rudimentary Powerpoint - all of which you can do with .. practically ANY word processing software out there, heck you could do most of the things I've seen people use Word for with Notepad.

So this leaves the big question; why would you pay so much for Office? And of course the answer is "someone sent me a .doc which I couldn't open with another program".


I use it because it is, quite literally, perfect. There really isn't much you can't do with Office. Yea, some other products have a lot of the same features but, they don't have ALL the same features.

e-berlin.org said,
And ORACLE's FREE OpenOffice suite has 5 times more downloads than last year.

Hate to say it, but with MS Office Home and Student and Home Business editions, going with OOo is less and less attractive. MS Office's user experience blows away OOo.

Miuku said,

I'm a little curious, after having dealt with Microsoft office for years, as to why people use it in the first place?

For us the "Review" features are a must for MS Word. We are also engineers and probably use Excel to its full potential. Does everyone need MS Office? Nah. But MS Office provides a much better user experience, and if you use MS Office for your day-to-day work what's a few hundred bucks?

Brent1700 said,

I use it because it is, quite literally, perfect. There really isn't much you can't do with Office. Yea, some other products have a lot of the same features but, they don't have ALL the same features.

Perfect? Don't be preposterous. No software is perfect.

Is Excel's use of 'undo' perfect?

tomjol said,

You used 'literally'. I assumed that that was therefore what you meant.


I meant that it's perfect in the sense that you can pretty much do anything with it... which is what I said. Obviously, every program has bugs but, that wasn't what I was referring to.

Brent1700 said,

I meant that it's perfect in the sense that you can pretty much do anything with it... which is what I said. Obviously, every program has bugs but, that wasn't what I was referring to.

I do at this point of course understand what you mean, indeed I did before, but was merely being a pedant. Try as I might, the misuse of 'literally' is something which really irks me.

So, I know what you meant, but you called it "literally perfect" without meaning "literally perfect". "Perfect" would have been fine, "literally perfect" not so much

Miuku said,

I'm a little curious, after having dealt with Microsoft office for years, as to why people use it in the first place?

Most of the clients I've seen use Word, some very very basic functions of Excel and some rudimentary Powerpoint - all of which you can do with .. practically ANY word processing software out there, heck you could do most of the things I've seen people use Word for with Notepad.

So this leaves the big question; why would you pay so much for Office? And of course the answer is "someone sent me a .doc which I couldn't open with another program".

From my experience... it's simply not cost efficient to use free software! Letting staff spend time learning a different program, and then having problems a couple of times a year with something they can't figure out is very costly. Particularly higher up the pay scale you go. You only have to lose a few hours worth of billing a year before you've lost more billable hours than the money you thought you had saved.

Miuku said,

I'm a little curious, after having dealt with Microsoft office for years, as to why people use it in the first place?

Most of the clients I've seen use Word, some very very basic functions of Excel and some rudimentary Powerpoint - all of which you can do with .. practically ANY word processing software out there, heck you could do most of the things I've seen people use Word for with Notepad.

So this leaves the big question; why would you pay so much for Office? And of course the answer is "someone sent me a .doc which I couldn't open with another program".

There is nothing even close in comparison. Just because you dont have a reason to use its more richer features does not mean there are not millions, yes millions of power users.

tomjol said,

I do at this point of course understand what you mean, indeed I did before, but was merely being a pedant. Try as I might, the misuse of 'literally' is something which really irks me.

So, I know what you meant, but you called it "literally perfect" without meaning "literally perfect". "Perfect" would have been fine, "literally perfect" not so much

Get over yourself.

Miuku said,

I'm a little curious, after having dealt with Microsoft office for years, as to why people use it in the first place?

Most of the clients I've seen use Word, some very very basic functions of Excel and some rudimentary Powerpoint - all of which you can do with .. practically ANY word processing software out there, heck you could do most of the things I've seen people use Word for with Notepad.

So this leaves the big question; why would you pay so much for Office? And of course the answer is "someone sent me a .doc which I couldn't open with another program".

Try retraining anyone lately? thought not! office staff know office - simples! and trying to make them do things differently can cost a fortune in both training costs and lost production (the move to a ribbon is not the same, so please dont bring up that old chestnut - I do this for a living and its really not the same as trying to get people to use a new 'free' suite).

Then when you move into any company using SBS upwards (meaning they have AD and group policy) then you start to see how centrally managed things can become (setting templates, paths, security settings, preferences etc so all users have the SAME experience)

Then you get the fact that if you need the advanced features even one, they are there.

Then you have, s you said, compatibility with files coming in from customers etc - people are not bothered about the whys, they want results, they want ease of use, they don't want to pay someone to come in, install a free office suite, show all users how to convert docs (they see this is a stupid unnecessary step - as I do), show them how to use the new software, why certain options are not avaiilable....blar blar blar....

Its not free software when you have to pay for training, or even if there is a little downtime/slowdown while people get used to it. £170 for home and business is not expensive when you consider its used everyday, and just a few hours of non production would cost more than that!

duddit2 said,

Try retraining anyone lately? thought not! office staff know office - simples! and trying to make them do things differently can cost a fortune in both training costs and lost production (the move to a ribbon is not the same, so please dont bring up that old chestnut - I do this for a living and its really not the same as trying to get people to use a new 'free' suite).

Then when you move into any company using SBS upwards (meaning they have AD and group policy) then you start to see how centrally managed things can become (setting templates, paths, security settings, preferences etc so all users have the SAME experience)

Then you get the fact that if you need the advanced features even one, they are there.

Then you have, s you said, compatibility with files coming in from customers etc - people are not bothered about the whys, they want results, they want ease of use, they don't want to pay someone to come in, install a free office suite, show all users how to convert docs (they see this is a stupid unnecessary step - as I do), show them how to use the new software, why certain options are not avaiilable....blar blar blar....

Its not free software when you have to pay for training, or even if there is a little downtime/slowdown while people get used to it. £170 for home and business is not expensive when you consider its used everyday, and just a few hours of non production would cost more than that!

Not to mention for home users, the Home and Student costs $150 and allows you to install in up to 3 different machines (turning out to costing $50 per license - I for instance bought it for use at home and also installed it at my parent's and my brother's). So, in the end the cost of Office is not that expensiveb (specially when you take into account that a computer games costs $50-60, and Office will last you a couple of years)

e-berlin.org said,
And ORACLE's FREE OpenOffice suite has 5 times more downloads than last year.

haha even a million x 0 is still 0.