Rhapsody Opens Fire Against ITunes With DRM-free MP3s

Rhapsody will sell MP3s in a new digital download store launched Monday for U.S. consumers, an offering that will pose fresh competition to Apple's highly successful iTunes Music Store. The songs will not have DRM (Digital Rights Management) technology, which puts restrictions on how music can be transferred between devices and PCs, and will be compatible with Apple's iPod line.

Music will come from most of the major record labels, which have increasingly moved to offer tracks without DRM in order to boost the attractiveness of buying music online. Rhapsody, which is owned by RealNetworks, will match Apple's pricing: US$.99 per song, or $9.99 per album.

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25 Comments

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Real networks could offer me a gold brick for free and I still wouldn't touch them with a 50 foot barge pole.

The only good thing about this is the previewing of entire songs instead of iTunes' 30 sec preview. Otherwise iTunes is still the largest music store so why use Rhapsody?

Rhapsody and Amazon DRM free music are cheaper then DRM free songs on iTunes and you can use any mp3 player.
Amazon has a large selection of music, not as big as iTunes but most new songs will be on Amazon and iTunes around the same time.

(Doli said @ #10.1)
Rhapsody and Amazon DRM free music are cheaper then DRM free songs on iTunes and you can use any mp3 player.
Amazon has a large selection of music, not as big as iTunes but most new songs will be on Amazon and iTunes around the same time.

Not anymore. iTunes Plus tracks are now USD $.99 per song / $9.99 per album. Transcode them to mp3 if you like. People will say you will lose some quality but 256kbps AAC files are equivalent to 320kbps mp3 files so I highly doubt you'd hear any loss yourself. Like I said, not much of a reason to start using Rhapsody.

If you have a good media player, it should support AAC, so you don't have to transcode it.

A lot of the cheap stuff doesn't support AAC though.

Does anybody really care about DRM-free music anyway, other than those who want to share it with others, which is illegal anyway. iTunes is perfect for people who love music, but tbh... you can not beat holding a cd case, opening it's wrapper and putting it in a cd player :), and you'll never be able to get rid of that.

Digital music is for the lazy.

Digital music is not for the lazy. If there are only a few songs that I want then digital is the way to go instead of buying the whole album. Why buy an album if I only want to play a few songs?

Also, I use Amazon for my music because I get the choice of downloading it from their site without using an application like iTunes or I can install a small file downloader from amazon for multiple files. So I dont need iTunes.

(traxor said @ #8)
Does anybody really care about DRM-free music anyway, other than those who want to share it with others, which is illegal anyway. iTunes is perfect for people who love music, but tbh... you can not beat holding a cd case, opening it's wrapper and putting it in a cd player :), and you'll never be able to get rid of that.

Digital music is for the lazy.

Stop buying CDs, then. CDDA = Compact Disc Digital Audio

DRM restricts my ability to put the music on all the PC's and portable players WHICH I OWN, i don't want drm free just so I can ****ing upload torrents. I should be able to do what I want with the music I purchase, which is why I buy cd's or when I buy digital (Which can actually be very convenient) I Buy from DRM free stores like Amazon.

iTunes offers DRM free music, and as a plus it's in a higher quality than the normal (DRMed) music.

And I do care about DRM free music, I'd like to be able to play music on my stereo, and my stereo doesn't run Windows or OS X (but does play AAC).

After having lost access to DRM'd music that I paid for when MusicMatch's keys went AWOL, I only buy DRM free music now. I have too many playback options - from my car's MP3 multi CD player to my iPod Touch and my Windows Vista Media Center music box - to deal with DRM restrictions on any of them.

As the CONSUMER, I paid for the right to hear this song...period. I'll be damned if I let anyone tell me that any given playback device is more or less legal as part of some arbitrary studio monopoly-based corporate ****ing contest.

(Galley said @ #3)
Rhapsody is giving away 100,000 FREE albums. The songs download as a zip file, so there's no need to download any additional software. I chose a Ventures compilation with 29 tracks.

http://mp3.rhapsody.com/home.html

Though I can always be swayed with a little bribery. I'm so shallow, lol

EDIT: Valid email address and credit card required for account set up

Obviously, it was going to be that way, but I'll still pass.

(excalpius said @ #3.2)
Note that you only get ONE album, in the form of a credit towards your first album purchase.

So it's not actualy free, more like buy-one-get-one-free.
Why am I not surpirsed.
Screw Real Networks. They suck.

(DARKFiB3R said @ #2)
Sorry, but I still firmly on the "I hate RealNetworks" bandwagon.

They can stick it, as far as I'm concerned.

+1!!!!!!!